30. April 2013 · Comments Off · Categories: Kim, Poetry · Tags:

Crossing the Water by Sylvia Plath, read by Kim, on 04/30/2013

Crossing the Water is some of Plath’s best work!

19. April 2013 · Comments Off · Categories: Kim, Poetry · Tags:

The School Among the Ruins by Adrienne Rich, read by Kim, on 04/16/2013

Adrienne Rich is one of my favorite poets. She writes rich engaging poetry to hold the reader’s interest.

19. April 2013 · Comments Off · Categories: Kim, Poetry · Tags:

The Inner Room by James Merrill, read by Kim, on 04/17/2013

I’m not a huge fan of James Merrill. His poems are difficult to read and difficult to understand.

19. April 2013 · Comments Off · Categories: Kim, Poetry · Tags:

The October Palace by Jane Hirshfield, read by Kim, on 04/19/2013

I like Jan Hirschfeld’s poetry because of her extreme imagery even though she is a little hard to understand at times.

15. April 2013 · Comments Off · Categories: Kim, Poetry · Tags:

This Great Unknowing: Last Poems by Denise Levertov, read by Kim, on 04/14/2013

Denise Levertov one of my favorite poets. I read this collection with a touch of melancholy knowing that these were the last poems she wrote before she passed away.

15. April 2013 · Comments Off · Categories: Kim, Poetry · Tags:

Night of a Thousand Blossoms by Frank Gaspar, read by Kim, on 04/13/2013

Frank Gaspar writes excellent prose!

15. April 2013 · Comments Off · Categories: Kim, Poetry · Tags:

Without by Donald Hall, read by Kim, on 04/14/2013

This is a collection of poems by one of my favorite poets, Donald Hall, who writes about the loss of his wife, poet Jane Kenyon. Very moving. Anyone who has ever lost someone they loved to cancer will read these poems like a prayer.

20. December 2012 · Comments Off · Categories: Historical Fiction, Tammy · Tags:

Thrall by Natasha Trethewey, read by Tammy, on 12/16/2012

This is the follow-up volume of poetry to Trethewey’s 2007 Pulitzer Prize–winning Native Guard and it clearly shows why she is the new Poet Laurette of the United States.

She beautifully blends her personal family history into the history of America, especially the deep south. She is an interracial child, when a black woman and white man marrying was not only dangerous but illegal in her parents home state. She uses her poetry to show the struggles of not only southern America but of many forgotten names and faces in history. Natasha Trethewey uses her knowledge of history and the faces in colonial paintings as inspiration. She meditates on captivity, knowledge, and inheritance throughout this work. As she reflects on a series of estrangements from her father she comes to an understand how they are part of the ongoing history of race in America.