23. March 2015 · Write a comment · Categories: Adult Books, Humor, Tammy · Tags: , ,

Texts from Dog by October Jones, 100 pages, read by Tammy, on 03/08/2015

texts from dog  Author October Jones shares the text between him and his pet bulldog. His endearing Dog and his alter-ego Batdog were born. Texts from Dog features his attempts to keep the neighborhood safe from the enemy otherwise known as the Postman. Stories about his arch-enemy Cat-Cat are also included. Some stories are laugh out loud funny. However, keep in mind that these texts are between two young adult males (one human, one dog) about whatever it is they are thinking. Not child friendly humor.

31. January 2015 · Comments Off · Categories: Humor, Inspirational, Tammy · Tags: , ,

Lessons from a Dog by Patrick Moberg , 64 pages, read by Tammy, on 01/12/2015

lessons from a dogDogs may slobber and shed but they are loyal, sensitive and affectionate. Illustrator Patrick Moberg illustrates lessons we can learn from man’s best friend on how to be a better person. Sweet and fun.

16. January 2015 · Comments Off · Categories: Adult Books, Humor, Tammy · Tags: , , ,

Sorry I Pooped in Your Shoe (and Other Heartwarming Letters from Doggie) by Jeremy Greenberg, 64 pages, read by Tammy, on 01/11/2015

sorry i pooped This is a funny collection of 50 letters from man’s best friend, his dog. Each letter is accompanied by a photo of the dog “writing” the letter. Whether the letter is an apology, an explanation of what human’s think are weird habits of dogs or just a suggestion of dogs and people can cohabit better together, all are relate-able to anyone who has ever had a dog. The letters over insight into your dog’s point of view as well as human nature.

30. March 2012 · Comments Off · Categories: Biographies, Kira, NonFiction · Tags:

Chicken soup for the pet lover's soul by Canfield, Jack, 140 pages, read by Kira, on 03/29/2012

This book contains a variety of people’s emotional experiences with various animals that became pets, from your typical dogs and cats, to fawn (later a deer) and to a Mexican wolf.   I hadn’t read any of the Chicken soup books, figuring they’d be too maudlin & sentimental for me (do I sound like a literary snob?).  And the first story did end a bit too sweetly.  A widow receives a puppy, along with a letter, for Christmas from her husband who died a couple weeks ago from cancer.  After crying to the new puppy she suddenly has the energy to decorate for Christmas – really – ok grief recovery is a jagged thing (up & down), and maybe the letter and the connection to her husband through the dog means a lot – h’mm.

I did like the stories overall.  I also started to wonder why I have an attitude toward the Chicken soup books – they’re definitely Not highbrow (though I read scifi/fantasy, so why do I care).  Are Jack London’s canine stories acclaimed because he includes a lot more detail, underlying morals, a tragic ending, or are they well thought of because he’s Jack London.  I have to remember that Reading Advisers say “Never apologize for your reading tastes”.