31. January 2015 · Comments Off · Categories: Humor, Inspirational, Tammy · Tags: , ,

Lessons from a Dog by Patrick Moberg , 64 pages, read by Tammy, on 01/12/2015

lessons from a dogDogs may slobber and shed but they are loyal, sensitive and affectionate. Illustrator Patrick Moberg illustrates lessons we can learn from man’s best friend on how to be a better person. Sweet and fun.

16. January 2015 · Comments Off · Categories: Adult Books, Humor, Tammy · Tags: , , ,

Sorry I Pooped in Your Shoe (and Other Heartwarming Letters from Doggie) by Jeremy Greenberg, 64 pages, read by Tammy, on 01/11/2015

sorry i pooped This is a funny collection of 50 letters from man’s best friend, his dog. Each letter is accompanied by a photo of the dog “writing” the letter. Whether the letter is an apology, an explanation of what human’s think are weird habits of dogs or just a suggestion of dogs and people can cohabit better together, all are relate-able to anyone who has ever had a dog. The letters over insight into your dog’s point of view as well as human nature.

30. March 2012 · Comments Off · Categories: Biographies, Kira, NonFiction · Tags:

Chicken soup for the pet lover's soul by Canfield, Jack, 140 pages, read by Kira, on 03/29/2012

This book contains a variety of people’s emotional experiences with various animals that became pets, from your typical dogs and cats, to fawn (later a deer) and to a Mexican wolf.   I hadn’t read any of the Chicken soup books, figuring they’d be too maudlin & sentimental for me (do I sound like a literary snob?).  And the first story did end a bit too sweetly.  A widow receives a puppy, along with a letter, for Christmas from her husband who died a couple weeks ago from cancer.  After crying to the new puppy she suddenly has the energy to decorate for Christmas – really – ok grief recovery is a jagged thing (up & down), and maybe the letter and the connection to her husband through the dog means a lot – h’mm.

I did like the stories overall.  I also started to wonder why I have an attitude toward the Chicken soup books – they’re definitely Not highbrow (though I read scifi/fantasy, so why do I care).  Are Jack London’s canine stories acclaimed because he includes a lot more detail, underlying morals, a tragic ending, or are they well thought of because he’s Jack London.  I have to remember that Reading Advisers say “Never apologize for your reading tastes”.