17. November 2014 · Write a comment · Categories: Adult Books, Fiction, Katy · Tags: , ,

A Dog's Journey by W. Bruce Cameron, 336 pages, read by Katy, on 11/12/2014

51k21dVfouL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_This book is the sequel to A Dog’s Purpose. In the first book Buddy is a dog that is reborn several times and in each life he takes care of a boy named Ethan. No matter where or to whom he is born, each new life directs him to Ethan and he finds that it his purpose to look after him. At the beginning of A Dog’s Journey, Ethan has already passed away. Buddy still lives with Ethan’s widow and meets their baby granddaughter, Clarity. Buddy grows old and feeble, and after he is put to sleep he is surprised to find he has been reborn yet again. He is reunited with Clarity and knows it is his purpose to look after her, just like he looked after Ethan. He is reunited with her through several dog lives, and helps her through rough teenage years, a difficult young adulthood, and middle and old age.

 

This is such a sweet story of unconditional love.

unleashing your inner dogThough this book came out in 2001 it definitely has a hippie or new age vibe going on especially in the art work. I was expecting a more humorous book, but it is more philosophical and about how to have a relaxed, joyful outlook on life no matter what is happening. Mari Stein shares her observations of her dogs’ joy in the every day: eating, chasing a stick, leaping for a Frisbee are all approached with the same open honesty. Dogs truly are nature’s pure examples of unconditional love and loyalty.

10. November 2014 · Write a comment · Categories: Fiction, Tammy · Tags: , , ,

Dog Days of Arthur Cane by T. Ernesto Bethancourt , 160 pages, read by Tammy, on 11/03/2014

dog days Arthur is a not a bad guy, but he’s not the most considerate or thoughtful person either. He makes fun of a transfer student’s heritage and religious beliefs including the power of voodoo. Next morning, Arthur wakes up to find himself transformed into a dog. And not a nice pure bred dog his own well to do family would like but a mangy looking mutt. Through his new viewpoint of the world as a dog, Arthur learns about friendship, compassion, kindness and consideration for others. Follow Arthur on his life changing adventure. You may treat others better afterwards whether they be man or beast.

05. November 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Fiction, Kira, Memoirs · Tags: , ,

Haatchi & Little B: the Inspiring True Story of one Boy and his Dog by Wendy Holden, 224 pages, read by Kira, on 11/01/2014

So I was looking for a the animal’s point of view story preferably a cat story.  What I found on our ebook listing was this dog story and Not from the dog’s point of view.  It is a story about lives who deal with disability and how the dog helps the little boy.  Owen the young boy was born with a rare genetic abnormality called Schwartz-Jampel Syndrome.  This syndrome shortens and tightens all his muscles limiting his mobility in the extreme.

Haatchi the dog, had been tied to train tracks and run over, consequently missing his tail and one of his rear legs.81LTSYB7-zL._SL1500_ haatchi-640x360 owen-haatchi Both need lots of special attention, physical therapy.  Owen had been withdrawing into himself, as he noticed his difference from fellow kids.  Haatchi brought him out of his shell, and 571151-24ab88ee-982c-11e3-ae2a-c06439f32ae2allowed him to blossom.  Haatchi won all sorts of awards it seemed almost improbably, but I guess, the grand prize has to go to someone.

Haatchi’s presence helped the fundraising effort for Owen’s new wheelchair.  It ends with a short glossary of special words used by Owen with Haatchi.

07. August 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Adult Books, NonFiction, Pamela · Tags:

Jim the wonder dog by Clarence Dewey Mitchell, 143 pages, read by Pamela, on 08/07/2014

jim 1   jim 2jim 3Jim the wonder dog was known around Missouri and the continental United States for his uncanny ability to do anything his master asked him to do.

His breed, Llewellyn English Setter, was known for being a bird dog.  His master Sam Van Arsdale sent him to a kennel for training, but Jim decided that unless there were birds about, he saw no need to alert his trainer.  The trainer noted that he was a smart dog of unusual intelligence because in the heat of the day with no birds about, Jim decided to seek shade rather than run about in the fields.  This was only the beginning of Jim’s demonstration of his intelligence.

Mr. Van Arsdale tested Jim quite frequently in front of various audiences.  He asked Jim to identify people with certain hair color, specific colored clothing, and people who were skeptics in the crowd.  Jim never failed a test.

This book details many instances where Jim performed unfailingly throughout his twelve year life.

His life is celebrated in Marshall, Missouri where he lived most of those years.  In 1999, the town built and dedicated a park in Jim’s honor.

This book is a nice piece of Missouri animal history.

20. December 2012 · Comments Off · Categories: Fiction, Tammy · Tags: , , ,

The Art of Racing in the Rain by Garth Stein, 321 pages, read by Tammy, on 12/14/2012

A unique look at life and what is really important: family, love, loyalty and hope and all told through the eyes of a dog. But not any ordinary dog. Enzo knows that he is different from other dogs. He has learned about life and this strange human world through television and from the words of his master, Denny Swift, a race car driver.

Funny, but at times heart-wrenching this is a beautifully written story of humanity and compassion as only Enzo can share it. Keep the Kleenex nearby.

10. May 2012 · 1 comment · Categories: NonFiction, Tammy · Tags: , ,

Rin Tin Tin: The Life and the Legend by Susan Orlean, 324 pages, read by Tammy, on 05/05/2012

Susan Orlean follows Rin Tin Tin’s journey from orphaned puppy to movie star and international icon and follows the lives of his ardent fans that kept the lineage alive and documented but shows the appeal of the character across generations of fans and puppies. So much so that some say Rin Tin Tin has never died because there is always a Rin Tin Tin or Rinny.

The story begins on a battlefield in France during World War I, when a young American soldier, Lee Duncan, discovered a newborn German shepherd in the ruins of a bombed-out dog kennel. Duncan brought Rinty home to California, where the dog’s athleticism and acting ability drew the attention of Warner Bros. Over the next ten years, Rinty starred in twenty-three blockbuster silent films that saved the studio from bankruptcy and made him the most famous dog in the world. At the height of his popularity, Rin Tin Tin was Hollywood’s number one box office star. During the decades that followed, Rinty and his descendants rose and fell with the times, making a tumultuous journey from silent films to talkies, from black-and-white to color, from radio programs to one of the most popular television shows of the baby boom era, The Adventures of Rin-Tin-Tin. The canine hero’s legacy was cemented by Duncan and a small group of others—including Bert Leonard, the producer of the TV series, and Daphne Hereford, the owner of the current Rin Tin Tin—who have dedicated their lives to making sure the dog’s legend will never die. A heartfelt story.