29. July 2012 · Comments Off · Categories: History, Memoirs, NonFiction, Tammy · Tags: ,

Silver Like Dust: One Family's Story of America's Japanese Internment by Kimi Cunningham Grant, 325 pages, read by Tammy, on 07/26/2012

Moving story of one Japanese families experiences in an internment camp in Montana during WWII. Author Kimi Grant wanted to learn more about her families history and especially about her quiet grandmother while an English major in college and this begins her informal interviews with her grandmother while visiting her each summer. She took several years to learn all she thought her grandmother could tell her, without intruding on her grandmother’s privacy or disrespecting her in any way. The story is told mainly from the grandmother’s memories but is fleshed out with historical research by the author. She also tries to relate how this heritage has affected her family and how being in her 20s the way the majority of the Japanese accepted internment as showing loyalty to their new country. Two of her great-uncles served in the U.S. military during WWII. One in the all Japanese Unit that has the distinction of having been awarded the most medals of any single unit during WWII. From geographic clues given in the grandmother’s memories this appears to be the same camp that Sandra Dallas used for her novel Tall Grass told from the viewpoint of people living between a Japanese camp and a small Montana town. Since I just read that novel a few months ago that made the story seem even more special to me… to be able to learn some more history and to read the memories of someone from the other side of the barbed wire and armed guards

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