05. August 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Adult Books, Eric, Fiction, Historical Fiction

Sharpe's Tiger by Bernard Cornwell, 385 pages, read by Eric, on 07/19/2014

Richard Sharpe is Bernard Cornwell’s most famous creation, a very flawed British war hero of the Napoleonic era. Following the wild successes of other Sharpe novels, Cornwell decided to jump back in time, and provide some of Sharpe’s back story, mentioned in bits and pieces throughout the series, but not fully fleshed out. This, then, became the “first” Sharpe novel, when he is less than twenty years old, and miserable within the British ranks serving in 1799 India.

For fans of the Sharpe novels, being reintroduced to those pivotal in Sharpe’s later life (especially the detestable Hakeswill) is a joy, and I found the writing nearly as effective as the core Sharpe favorites. India is a fantastic setting, even under horrific conditions during a questionable campaign. Sharpe finds himself in the usual mess, but this isn’t a bad thing, especially when armed with the knowledge of where it all eventually leads. This series isn’t for everyone, but a must-read for those interested in painstaking recreation of actual battles, handled by a master of the genre.

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