07. August 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Apocalyptic, Brian, Fiction, Teen Books

Allegiant by Veronica Roth, read by Brian, on 08/06/2014

alliegenAllegiant, is the final book of the Divergent series.  Power struggles and violence has destroyed the fraction-based society.  Tris, Four and others venture outside the fence for a more peaceful society.  What they find is shocking and appalling and new problems arise and our heroes must find a way to make the dystopian world whole or at least die trying.

 

07. August 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Adult Books, NonFiction, Pamela · Tags:

Jim the wonder dog by Clarence Dewey Mitchell, read by Pamela, on 08/07/2014

jim 1   jim 2jim 3Jim the wonder dog was known around Missouri and the continental United States for his uncanny ability to do anything his master asked him to do.

His breed, Llewellyn English Setter, was known for being a bird dog.  His master Sam Van Arsdale sent him to a kennel for training, but Jim decided that unless there were birds about, he saw no need to alert his trainer.  The trainer noted that he was a smart dog of unusual intelligence because in the heat of the day with no birds about, Jim decided to seek shade rather than run about in the fields.  This was only the beginning of Jim’s demonstration of his intelligence.

Mr. Van Arsdale tested Jim quite frequently in front of various audiences.  He asked Jim to identify people with certain hair color, specific colored clothing, and people who were skeptics in the crowd.  Jim never failed a test.

This book details many instances where Jim performed unfailingly throughout his twelve year life.

His life is celebrated in Marshall, Missouri where he lived most of those years.  In 1999, the town built and dedicated a park in Jim’s honor.

This book is a nice piece of Missouri animal history.

06. August 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Adult Books, Fiction, Pamela

Nineteen Minutes by Jodi Picoult, read by Pamela, on 07/29/2014

19 minIn nineteen minutes, you can mow the front lawn, color your hair, watch a third of a hockey game. In nineteen minutes, you can bake scones or get a tooth filled by a dentist; you can fold laundry for a family of five….In nineteen minutes, you can stop the world, or you can just jump off it. In nineteen minutes, you can get revenge.

Sterling is a small, ordinary New Hampshire town where nothing ever happens — until the day its complacency is shattered by a shocking act of violence. In the aftermath, the town’s residents must not only seek justice in order to begin healing but also come to terms with the role they played in the tragedy. For them, the lines between truth and fiction, right and wrong, insider and outsider have been obscured forever. Josie Cormier, the teenage daughter of the judge sitting on the case, could be the state’s best witness, but she can’t remember what happened in front of her own eyes. And as the trial progresses, fault lines between the high school and the adult community begin to show, destroying the closest of friendships and families.

Nineteen Minutes is New York Times bestselling author Jodi Picoult’s most raw, honest, and important novel yet. Told with the straightforward style for which she has become known, it asks simple questions that have no easy answers: Can your own child become a mystery to you? What does it mean to be different in our society? Is it ever okay for a victim to strike back? And who — if anyone — has the right to judge someone else?

06. August 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Apocalyptic, Fiction, Leslie, Teen Books

Fragments by Dan Wells, read by Leslie, on 07/21/2014

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After discovering the cure for RM, Kira Walker sets off on a terrifying journey into the ruins of postapocalyptic America and the darkest desires of her heart in order to uncover the means—and a reason—for humanity’s survival.

While we have gotten a lot of gadgets from science fiction stories as life imitates art, I can only hope that we never see stories of post apocalyptic earth ever come true.  The series is definitely a story of perseverance and the human spirit never giving up.  A thrilling, can’t wait to see what happens next, kind of story, a good young adult series.

06. August 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Adult Books, Fiction, Leslie, Mystery

Murder on St. Mark's Place by Victoria Thompson, read by Leslie, on 07/13/2014

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As a midwife in the turn-of-the-century tenements of New York City, Sarah Brandt has seen suffering and joy, birth and death-and even murder. And the crime ridden streets of the teeming city offer little relief from either.

Thinking she has been summoned by German immigrant Agnes Otto to usher a new life into the world, Sarah Brandt is greeted by the news of an untimely death instead. It seems that Agnes’s beautiful younger sister, Gerda, had fallen into the life of a “Charity Girl.” Caught up in the false glamour of the city’s nightlife, she would trade her company – and her favors – not for money, but for lavish gifts and an evenings’ entertainment. And now she was dead; victim, no doubt, of one of her “gentlemen friends.”

No one cares much about the fate of girls like Gerda, but Sarah does. And she vows to find her killer. To do so, she turns to Sergeant Frank Malloy. As the two pursue an investigation that leads from the bright lights of Coney Island to the stately homes of Fifth Avenue, they find that their shared passion for justice may cost them dearly…

A quick read series, this is the 3rd one, and very enjoyable.  I just wonder when Sarah and Sergeant Malloy will figure out that each is finding the other good company to be with.  While they use the murders as the main reason to see each other, at some point they need to spend time together when not solving mysteries.  I find the historical aspect of the stories fascinating and learn things I really had no idea about, this book clued me into what a Charity Girl was, I had never heard the term before.

06. August 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Children's Books, Fantasy, Fiction, Leslie

The Ninja Librarian: the Accidental Keyhand by Jen Swann Downey, read by Leslie, on 07/07/2014

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Dorrie and her brother Marcus accidently open a portal to Petrarch’s Library, where they discover a secret society of warrior librarians who travel in time, protecting the world’s greatest thinkers from torture and death for sharing knowledge and ideas.

I picked this one because of the title, obviously!  It is a cute little story that kids might enjoy fantasizing that might happen to them.  You drop accidently into another world you never knew existed and find yourself wanting to spend more time there.  A good read, with both a main girl and boy protagonist, so it should appeal to both as readers.

06. August 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Adult Books, Fiction, Leslie, Paranormal

Midnight Crossroad by Charlaine Harris, read by Leslie, on 07/02/2014

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Welcome to Midnight, Texas, a town with many boarded-up windows and few full-time inhabitants, located at the crossing of Witch Light Road and Davy Road. It’s a pretty standard dried-up western town.

There’s a pawnshop (someone lives in the basement and is seen only at night). There’s a diner (people who are just passing through tend not to linger). And there’s new resident Manfred Bernardo, who thinks he’s found the perfect place to work in private (and who has secrets of his own).

Stop at the one traffic light in town, and everything looks normal. Stay awhile, and learn the truth…

I wasn’t sure what to expect from this new series, more of what she wrote in the Sooky Stackhouse series, or something entirely new.  Well, it’s kind of a mix, there’s a vampire, a psychic, a witch, some regular folks and a few still mysterious.  They all keep to themselves for the most part, but stick together, as only small town folks do.  I did enjoy this series, slightly different and quirky from her previous writings.  A good recommend to anyone who enjoys a little mystery mixed with the unknown.

06. August 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Courtney, Paranormal, Teen Books

Dark Metropolis by Jaclyn Dolamore, read by Courtney, on 07/13/2014

Thea’s father died in battle and her mother suffers from a magic curse known as “bound sickness”, so keeping the small family afloat has fallen to Thea. She and many other young women work at as waitresses at a high-end club called “The Telephone Club”. It is here where she met her one and only friend, Nan. It’s also where she meets a boy her age named Freddy, with whom she has discovered an odd connection: when she touches him, they both drop into a vision of Thea’s father being raised from the dead. If this is the case, it would certainly explain the bound sickness her mother, among others, suffers from. In this version of 1930′s Berlin, the more provincial residents still engage in a practice where husband and wife are magically bound until death. The binding is supposed to go away when one of the pair dies, but for many, the belief that their spouses are alive has caused a form of madness to take over their lives. Thea is intrigued by this connection to young Freddy, but is quickly far more concerned with the inexplicable disappearance of Nan. In the meantime, the reader is treated to Freddy’s point of view, where it is revealed that Freddy is being used by other, more powerful men to raise the dead for purposes that are not, at the outset, entirely clear. Freddy believes they are being returned to their families, but the vision he shares with Thea indicates that this is not the case. Together, Freddy and Thea begin to investigate and discover that there is far more going on behind the scenes than they ever could have thought possible.
Dark Metropolis certainly has an intriguing setting and some great, if not entirely unique, characters. The world building could have been stronger, particularly since we are experiencing an alternate history where many of the rules that govern our experience in our world do not apply in this one. I honestly just wanted to hear more about what this version of Berlin (ostensibly modeled loosely on Fritz Lang’s Metropolis) would look and feel like. Additionally, there is some sort of political discontent that winds up feeling generic since we never really find out what issues at the heart of it are. Thea, Nan and Freddy are interesting enough characters. Thea is the long-suffering, keeps-the-family-together sort. Freddy is a boy with a mysterious past who is suffering for his magical talent. Nan is the rabble-rousing, spirited best friend who does, admittedly, wind up in very unusual circumstances. They’re all likeable and fun to read, but I’ve seen characters very similar to these before and their trajectory is fairly predictable. Overall, though, this was a fun spin on zombies/necromancy with a really cool setting.

06. August 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Courtney, Teen Books, Thriller/Suspense

Complicit by Stephanie Kuehn, read by Courtney, on 07/11/2014

When Jamie Henry’s sister, “Crazy Cate” Henry went to jail a couple of years ago, everyone was happy. Cate had been notorious on a number of levels. Guys loved her, girls hated her, parents were uncomfortable around her. The final straw was a horrific fire at the barn where many of the town’s wealthy stabled their horses. The fire destroyed the barn, killed horses and left a girl in the ICU. Cate plead guilty and went to jail. Jamie and his adoptive parents were left to rebuild their family in the aftermath of the terrible crime. Now, however, Cate is out of jail and everything that Jamie has worked for, namely, a sense of normalcy in the face of a town that holds him almost as responsible as his sister for the crimes committed, is about to go out the window. Jamie’s had a tough time dealing with his sister’s absence, even if it does make life easier for the rest of the community. Jamie suffers from a condition that sounds an awful lot like a form of anxiety/panic and causes his hands and arms to lose all sensation. He even has special accommodations in place to get through a school day without the use of his arms. It had gotten better while Cate was in jail, but now that she’s out, the symptoms are back. Worse yet, Cate is calling Jamie and implying that she’s coming for him. Jamie is panicking – what does she want with him? Complicit is a short novel that packs quite a punch. Readers only have a small inkling of the circumstances surrounding Cate’s crime and the sibling’s past. Both Cate and Jamie are adopted and troubled, since their mother was killed before their eyes when they were young. They both see/have seen the same psychiatrist who has attempted to help both of them deal with their respective problems. As the novel unfolds, the reader gains insight into not only their past, but their relationship as well. The more we learn about Cate, the more we suspect that there’s more to her than meets the eye. Other mysteries pop up that apparently discredit the current interpretation of events. Then there’s the twist, and oh, what a twist. I had some suspicions regarding how things might play out, but I was still surprised by the end. This is an intense psychological thriller that doesn’t really feel like a thriller, which makes things all the more shocking in the end.

06. August 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Adult Books, Courtney, Graphic Novel, Science Fiction

FBP: Federal Bureau of Physics, Vol. 1: The Paradigm Shift by Simon Oliver, read by Courtney, on 07/08/2014

For all your physics-related emergencies, there’s only one entity to call: the FBP. Whether it’s just a localized loss of gravity or a full-blown bubble universe threatening to consume an entire city block, the FBP is there. Or they were until a mission goes horribly wrong and the political forces pushing for privatization get the perfect opportunity to discredit the FBP. Now, there are only a handful of dedicated agents left and the private industry is taking over. Adam Hardy has been dutifully serving FBP for years, but when he and his partner get caught up in a collapsing “bubbleverse”, Adam begins to realize that a conspiracy is at play and has been for years. Adam’s father died in a similar situation and the dots are now starting to connect for Adam.
This new comic series has a fantastic premise that is, by and large, well executed. The artwork is lovely and has a very organic feel to it, in spite of its somewhat unusual color palette. I didn’t really feel like I got to know Adam as a character very well, but there’s plenty of time for his character to develop. Adam’s new partner, Rosa, is a welcome addition to the otherwise predominantly male cast. FBP also gets bonus points for having not just one, but two POC main characters.

06. August 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Courtney, Fairy Tales and Folklore, Fantasy, Teen Books

The School for Good and Evil by Soman Chainani, read by Courtney, on 07/08/2014

Sophie really, really wants to get kidnapped. As the rest of the town prepares to hide away their children before the School Master shows up to make his selection, Sophie is busy pulling the boards off the windows and readying her things. Every so often, the School Master sneaks through the small town, taking two children at a time; one good, the other evil. The kidnapped children are transported to The School for Good and Evil, never to be seen by their loved ones again. Unless they turn up in the storybooks that magically appear in the local bookstore. Agatha doesn’t believe in The School for Good and Evil. She’d much rather keep a low profile and continue living in the cemetery. Naturally, Agatha is a bit surprised when she sees a shadow whisking her only friend, Sophie, away. Agatha grabs onto Sophie and finds herself transported as well. Sophie is elated, until she is dropped off at the Evil school. Agatha is again surprised to find herself delivered to the Good school. Convinced that there’s been a clerical error of some sort, Sophie tries everything in her power to get herself into the School for Good. She doesn’t fit in with the Evil kids; Sophie would never dream of wearing black, after all. Agatha is in a similar situation. She’s uncomfortable with the frilly pink uniform and can’t fathom why all the other girls are so fixated on meeting their princes. It would appear, however, that once the decision has been made, there’s no going back, no matter how badly Sophie wants to end with her chosen prince. Poor Agatha wants nothing more than to go back home to her graveyard where she won’t have to deal with other people or wear pink everyday. Together, they try to find ways to either get back into the “correct” schools or go home.
This was such a cute book. It could easily have felt like a HP spin-off, but it never does. It incorporates tons of fairy tale tropes, but uses them in new or unconventional ways. The twist of the girls being in the “wrong” schools wasn’t a huge surprise, but it poses many interesting questions regarding the nature of good and evil. It’s obvious to the reader that Agatha is anything but evil, in spite of her appearance. Sophie is slightly more ambiguous. She comes across as shallow and inconsiderate, sure, but not necessarily evil. In fact, most of the “good” kids have very similar character traits. The Good school in general emphasizes the appearance of good while the Evil school seems more focused on mischief rather than anything truly evil. The point, of course, is that the kids are fulfilling the traditional roles in fairy tales, but the school presents its dual nature as a preservation of balance. I read this one for my middle school book group and the kids unanimously agreed that it was tons of fun. They loved the sense of humor and the offbeat plot. Frankly, I found it to be a refreshing change of pace in the magic/fairy tale genre.

06. August 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Courtney, Paranormal, Teen Books

Croak by Gina Damico, read by Courtney, on 07/06/2014

At one point in time, Lex was a good kid. Now, she’s turned into a rage-filled delinquent. At a loss for what to do with her, Lex’s parents decide to send her off to her Uncle Mort’s place for the summer. Lex hates to part with her twin sister, but is given no choice in the matter. When Lex arrives in Croak, the small town Mort lives in, she discovers that any and all preconceived notions regarding her uncle were misplaced. As it turns out, Croak is a town exclusively for Reapers and her uncle is the mayor. Lex quickly discovers that not only does she have the ability to fulfill the role of a reaper, she’s actually quite talented at it. Just as she’s beginning to settle into a routine with her new partner, Driggs, something unusual begins to occur. Many of the lives Lex and co. have been sent to reap have an inexplicable cause of death. Lex and Driggs, along with their friends and Uncle Mort, make it their mission to find out more.
Croak was fairly amusing. The setting utilizes puns to a staggering degree and virtually every character is as sarcastic as the protagonist. The narrative moves quickly due to its sense of humor, but also suffers some when the humor starts to wear thin. I never felt like the characters were very well-developed. Lex’s “acting out” in the beginning feels antithetical to her character even before there’s any hint that being a violent kid somehow equates to a future as a reaper and, while she ceases to be particularly violent, there’s little other change in her character as the book progresses. Other characters are scarcely developed at all, particularly Lex’s twin sister, who appears to be included strictly for her scene at the very end. Most of my teens, however, loved this one. It was fun, but not fantastic.

06. August 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Contemporary Fiction, Courtney, Teen Books

Torn Away by Jennifer Brown, read by Courtney, on 07/03/2014

Jersey’s life changes forever as a massive tornado bears down on her hometown of Elizabeth, MO. Jersey’s mother and sister are at dance practice when the sirens go off. Jersey makes it down to the basement in the nick of time. After the storm, Jersey discovers that most of her neighborhood has been completely demolished; the roads are impassible and all means of communication have been disrupted. A day or two later, she finally finds her step-father, only to be told that her mother and sister are both dead. Even worse, her grief-stricken step-father wants nothing more to do with her and quickly dumps her off on her long-estranged father; the father who walked out years ago and never came back. Jersey has no real desire to get to know him or his side of the family, but she really has no choice. As it turns out, her father is still a drunk and has remarried (to another drunk) and lives with his parents, his sister, and her family. Jersey is given a “bedroom” on the screened-in back porch. She is almost immediately taunted by her cousins, neglected by her father and largely ignored by her new grandparents. There is no love in this house and certainly no sympathy for a girl who has just lost all the family she’s ever known. Things only continue to get worse at her paternal grandparent’s house, so Jersey tries to run off, only to be sent off to her maternal grandparents instead. Jersey has never met this set of grandparents either; they had disowned Jersey’s mother long ago. All Jersey wants is to go back home and try to rebuild with her friends and even her step-father, but, once again, it’s out of her hands. Now, still grieving and nursing the wounds of her time at her father’s, Jersey feels more isolated than ever. Her mother kept these people out of their lives for a reason and Jersey is convinced that her mother would not have wanted her to live with them. The longer Jersey stays there, however, Jersey begins to discover that there really might be more than one side to the story of her mother’s upbringing.
So many terrible things keep happening to poor Jersey. As though losing one’s home isn’t enough, losing nearly all the family she’s ever known and then being sent to live with strangers who have exactly zero empathy make this a pretty depressing read. Even the step-father suddenly turns into a massive jerk, taking himself out of Jersey’s life altogether and preventing her from attending the funerals. There’s a bit of light at the end of the book, but by the time it appears, readers will wonder whether Jersey is even capable of perceiving it anymore. Few of the characters are particularly well-developed and Jersey’s mother’s motivations behind isolating the family are never made explicitly clear. Nevertheless, readers will still pull for Jersey to make it out of this mess without it destroying her.

06. August 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Contemporary Fiction, Courtney, Teen Books

The Vigilante Poets of Selwyn Academy by Kate Hattemer, read by Courtney, on 07/01/2014

A group of friends, Ethan, Elizabeth, Jackson, and Luke, are all seniors at Selwyn Academy, a prestigious art school and the filming site for the current season of “For Art’s Sake”, a competition-style reality show. No one in the group is competing in the show, but that doesn’t stop the show from interfering in their lives in a number of frustrating ways. Ethan, the narrator, accidentally witnesses the show being filmed and realizes that not only is the show impeding actual learning and creativity, it’s also mostly scripted. Ethan doesn’t hesitate to share this information with the group. When Luke’s critical review of the show is rejected by the school newspaper for being unfavorable to the show (and the school’s participation in it), the group decides they ought to do something to make a statement. It’s not until they begin studying Ezra Pound that they figure out how they’re going to make their statement. Inspired by Pound’s Cantos, the group creates the Contracantos, a delightfully funny and scathing long poem. They then illustrate, hand-letter, print, and distribute the first installment of the Contracantos. Then they wait for a reaction. Imagine their surprise when Luke, the poet of the group, is approached by the show’s producers and subsequently added as a contestant. With Luke gone and not speaking to the rest of the group, Ethan and his friends must find a way to carry on. Good thing they’ve got the help of a gerbil named Baconnaise, who will prove to be surprisingly heroic for a rodent.
I enjoyed this one quite a bit. Ethan and crew are an intelligent and sarcastic bunch. I can’t help but feel that the secondary characters could have been better developed, but they may also have been a stylistic choice as the narrator has difficulty viewing others as much more than an archetype. The idea of a reality show essentially taking over a school, no matter how artsy, is abhorrent to me. Of course, I’m not a fan of the reality show genre in the first place, so this book may have been preaching to the choir in that sense. It definitely has a satirical tone to it. The whole “vigilante” artist thing is quite clever even if it’s hard to imagine someone who writes poetry as being fodder for a reality show. A fun and engaging read, complete with amusingly-named house pets.

06. August 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Adult Books, Fiction, Kristy, Women's Fiction (chick lit)

Landline by Rainbow Rowell, read by Kristy, on 07/14/2014

Landline is a typical story about a parent, Georgie McCool, who spends more time at work than at home. She opts to stay at work over Christmas rather than going with her husband and kids on their trip to Omaha. While fretting about her broken marriage, Georgie discovers a magical phone that allows her to talk to her husband from the past.

I absolutely love Rainbow, but this book was a flop for me. It had great description and dialogue, but the plot wasn’t great. The magic phone took away from the otherwise extremely realistic book, giving me a feeling of disconnect and disbelief. I much prefer Rainbow’s teen novels to her adult novels so far.

06. August 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Eric, Fiction, Historical Fiction

Sharpe's Triumph by Bernard Cornwell, read by Eric, on 07/26/2014

Private Richard Sharpe remains stuck in India, and things could not be worse for him in the British ranks. Hakeswill lives, and is doing his best to get him lashed to death on trumped up charges. Worse, Major Dodd’s traitorous actions have allowed Sharpe’s enemies a chance to get their revenge on him. Luckily, the nastier things get, the more Sharpe is in his element. Soon, he is teamed with Colonel McCandless, tracking Dodd down.

India remains a wonderful setting for these military adventures, and Cornwell’s writing (especially when describing sieges) is second to none. He is meticulous in his research, and honest (in endnotes) when taking liberties with history. Revisiting this series continues to be a blast, even though I have to admit it isn’t for everyone.

05. August 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Graphic Book, Humor, Lisa, Memoirs, NonFiction

Can't We Talk About Something More Pleasant by Roz Chast, read by Lisa, on 07/30/2014

In her first memoir, Roz Chast brings her signature wit to the topic of aging parents. Spanning the last several years of their lives and told through four-color cartoons, family photos, and documents, and a narrative as rife with laughs as it is with tears, Chast’s memoir is both comfort and comic relief for anyone experiencing the life-altering loss of elderly parents.

When it came to her elderly mother and father, Roz held to the practices of denial, avoidance, and distraction. But when Elizabeth Chast climbed a ladder to locate an old souvenir from the “crazy closet”—with predictable results—the tools that had served Roz well through her parents’ seventies, eighties, and into their early nineties could no longer be deployed.

While the particulars are Chast-ian in their idiosyncrasies—an anxious father who had relied heavily on his wife for stability as he slipped into dementia and a former assistant principal mother whose overbearing personality had sidelined Roz for decades—the themes are universal: adult children accepting a parental role; aging and unstable parents leaving a family home for an institution; dealing with uncomfortable physical intimacies; managing logistics; and hiring strangers to provide the most personal care.

An amazing portrait of two lives at their end and an only child coping as best she can, Can’t We Talk about Something More Pleasant will show the full range of Roz Chast’s talent as cartoonist and storyteller.

05. August 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Adult Books, Contemporary Fiction, Fiction, Lisa

The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin, read by Lisa, on 07/21/2014

On the faded Island Books sign hanging over the porch of the Victorian cottage is the motto “No Man Is an Island; Every Book Is a World.” A. J. Fikry, the irascible owner, is about to discover just what that truly means.

A. J. Fikry’s life is not at all what he expected it to be. His wife has died, his bookstore is experiencing the worst sales in its history, and now his prized possession, a rare collection of Poe poems, has been stolen. Slowly but surely, he is isolating himself from all the people of Alice Island-from Lambiase, the well-intentioned police officer who’s always felt kindly toward Fikry; from Ismay, his sister-in-law who is hell-bent on saving him from his dreary self; from Amelia, the lovely and idealistic (if eccentric) Knightley Press sales rep who keeps on taking the ferry over to Alice Island, refusing to be deterred by A.J.’s bad attitude. Even the books in his store have stopped holding pleasure for him. These days, A.J. can only see them as a sign of a world that is changing too rapidly.

And then a mysterious package appears at the bookstore. It’s a small package, but large in weight. It’s that unexpected arrival that gives A. J. Fikry the opportunity to make his life over, the ability to see everything anew. It doesn’t take long for the locals to notice the change overcoming A.J.; or for that determined sales rep, Amelia, to see her curmudgeonly client in a new light; or for the wisdom of all those books to become again the lifeblood of A.J.’s world; or for everything to twist again into a version of his life that he didn’t see coming. As surprising as it is moving, The Storied Life of A. J. Fikry is an unforgettable tale of transformation and second chances, an irresistible affirmation of why we read, and why we love.

05. August 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Adult Books, Fiction, Lisa, Mystery

One Plus One by Jojo Moyes, read by Lisa, on 07/14/2014

American audiences have fallen in love with Jojo Moyes. Ever since she debuted stateside, she has captivated readers and reviewers alike, and hit the New York Times bestseller list with the word-of-mouth sensation, Me Before You. Now, with One Plus One, she’s written another contemporary opposites-attract love story that reads like a modern-day Two for the Road.
 
Suppose your life sucks. A lot. Your husband has done a vanishing act, your teenage stepson is being bullied and your math whiz daughter has a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity that you can’t afford to pay for. That’s Jess’s life in a nutshell—until an unexpected knight-in-shining-armor offers to rescue them. Only Jess’s knight turns out to be Geeky Ed, the obnoxious tech millionaire whose vacation home she happens to clean. But Ed has big problems of his own, and driving the dysfunctional family to the Math Olympiad feels like his first unselfish act in ages . . . maybe ever.
 
One Plus One is Jojo Moyes at her astounding best. You’ll laugh, you’ll weep, and when you flip the last page, you’ll want to start all over again.

05. August 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Autobiographies, Lisa, Memoirs, NonFiction

I Forgot to Remember by Su Meck , read by Lisa, on 07/07/2014

In 1988 Su Meck was twenty-two and married with two children when a ceiling fan in her kitchen fell and struck her on the head, leaving her with a traumatic brain injury that erased all her memories of her life up to that point. Although her body healed rapidly, her memories never returned. 

Yet after just three weeks in the hospital, Su was released and once again charged with the care of two toddlers and a busy household. Adrift in a world about which she understood almost nothing, Su became an adept mimic, gradually creating routines and rituals that sheltered her and her family, however narrowly, from the near-daily threat of disaster, or so she thought. Though Su would eventually relearn to tie her shoes, cook a meal, and read and write, nearly twenty years would pass before a series of personally devastating events shattered the normal life she had worked so hard to build, and she realized that she would have to grow up all over again.

In her own indelible voice, Su offers us a view from the inside of a terrible injury, with the hope that her story will help give other brain injury sufferers and their families the resolve and courage to build their lives anew. Piercing, heartbreaking, but finally uplifting, this book is the true story of a woman determined to live life on her own terms.