17. June 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Children's Books, Fantasy, Fiction

Thursdays with the Crown by Jessica Day George, read by Angie, on 06/16/2014

I think Jessica Day George could be one of my favorite authors. For sure, the Castle Glower series is a must read for me. I never tire of reading about the adventures of Celie and her family. Thursdays with the Crown picks up right were Wednesdays in the Tower left off. Celie and the rest of the group have been transported to Glorious Arkower along with a couple of towers from The Castle. Right away they discover griffins, specifically the parents of Rufus, Celie’s griffin. They are also introduced to two different wizards with opposing views on who created The Castle, who poisoned the water in Arkower, and basically who is the evil one and who is the good one. Celie and crew must decide who to trust and figure out how to get back to Sleyne. This is yet another fabulous adventure in the Castle Glower series. I love the introduction of the griffins and all the history we learn about Castle Glower and Celie’s family. I really can’t wait for the next adventure for this fun series. 

Thank you to Netgalley for letting me read this book before it comes out. 

16. June 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Fantasy, Fiction, Teen Books

Heir of Fire (Throne of Glass #3) by Sarah J. Maas, read by Angie, on 06/15/2014

If you like feel-good, happily-ever-after stories this series is not for you. This series is full of heartache and despair, death and destruction, and evil monsters. The world of Celaena Sardothien is not a happy one. This is the middle book in a planned six book series and there is a lot going on. Celaena has gone to Wendlyn to try and find out more about the Wyrdkeys from Queen Maeve and to learn about her Fae magic. Chaol and Dorian are at odds with each other after the events of the last book. And the King of Adarlan is just as evil as ever and planning even more atrocities. We also get to meet new, fun characters in this book who I am sure are going to play big roles in the next books. This is a series I really enjoy and eagerly anticipate. I love the complexity of this world and the fact that Maas has thought up such an intriguing and detailed history for it. One of my favorites!

I received an advanced copy of this book from Netgalley. 

16. June 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Children's Books, Fiction, Science Fiction

The Battle For WondLa by Tony DiTerlizzi, read by Angie, on 06/15/2014

This is the final book in the wonderful WondLa series. Eva Nine and her companions must find a way to stop the evil Loroc before he completely destroys the civilizations of Orbona. We see the cast of characters we met in The Search for WondLa and A Hero for WondLa plus a few new ones as Eva travels across the land trying to save everyone. I loved her journey in this series and how much she has grown and changed. I thought the ending was a very satisfying one and I enjoyed the epilogues that told of the future of Orbona in the centuries to come. It had been a while since I read the previous books and this one made me want to read the series all together so I could really enjoy the progression of Eva’s character and the story. Fabulous series and one I would definitely recommend. 

13. June 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Children's Books, Fantasy, Fiction, Historical Fiction, Mystery

Twelve Minutes to Midnight by Christopher Edge, read by Angie, on 06/12/2014

Every night at twelve minutes to midnight the patients at Bedlam start writing. They do not awaken and do not remember what they wrote when they wake. The modern reader will recognize the writings as events of the 20th century. However, the story takes place in 1899 and the people reading the writings have no idea what they are. Penelope Treadwell is an orphan and a writer. She is the owner and managing editor of the Penny Dreadful paper and has created storytelling sensation Montgomery Flinch. Of course, Penny herself has penned all the writings so she has to hire an actor to portray Flinch in public. The readers of the Penny Dreadful would never believe a 13-year-old girl could write such amazing stories of horror and mystery. Penny is determined to solve the mystery of the Bedlam Midnight Papers. Her investigation leads her to Lady Cambridge, the Spider Lady of Kensington. Turns out Lady Cambridge is using spider venom on the Bedlam patients so they can see the future and she can control the future. Her schemes don’t stop there however, she wants to bring all of London into madness. Penny must do some incredible things in order to stop her.

I thought the majority of this book was wonderful. I loved the mystery of the Midnight Papers and how the writers could see into the future. I thought Penny was really smart and resourceful and determined. I was entertained by Monty, the actor hired to be Montgomery Flinch. I also thought Lady Cambridge was an interesting villain. Then I got to the last section of the book and I thought it all went a bit loopy. I like mysteries that are atleast a little bit believable. I can buy a mysterious spider whose venom allows the victim to have visions. That wasn’t bad. It was when another spider’s venom was ingested by the legendary writers of the day (Doyle, Wells, Haggard, Kipling, etc.) and they were able to infect everyone with the madness who read their words. That is when Edge lost me. I wish the ending could have been stronger as this book started out so well. Not sure it will bother kids as much as it bothered me, but it was still disappointing.

07. June 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Fiction, Mystery, Teen Books, Thriller/Suspense

The Naturals by Jennifer Lynn Barnes, read by Angie, on 06/06/2014

 

Cassie can read people like others read a book. She learned from her mother how to look at a given person and figure out everything about them. Cassie has been recruited by the FBI to join a new program where teenage “naturals” are trained to solve crimes. She joins the group of profilers and emotion-readers and statisticians. The group is training by looking at cold cases and trying to solve them. But their handlers Briggs and Locke are also working an actual case of a serial killer that seems to be escalating. Cassie and the others believe the killer is the same who killed her mom 5 years ago. The types of victims and the professions of some of the victims are too similar to be a coincidence. Then the killer seems to focus on Cassie. It will be up to the whole group to figure out who the killer is before he gets to Cassie.

 

I liked this book more than I thought I would. It was a gripping story with enough action to keep me interested. I liked Cassie and the other naturals and the dynamics between them. The twist on who the killer was and why they were killing was a good one and one I didn’t really see coming. This was a fun read and a good start to the series.

 

05. June 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Children's Books, Fiction, Historical Fiction, Steam-punk

Uncrashable Dakota by Andy Marino, read by Angie, on 06/01/2014

Uncrashable Dakota is an alternate history/steampunk middle grade adventure novel. During the Civil War, Samuel Dakota discovered the power of flight. Seems a certain kind of beetle really likes whiskey soaked sap. You feed it to them and they can fly. Put the beetles in a ship and the ship flies. This discovery ended the Civil War years early, started the flight industry in the 1860s and allowed Lincoln to live to be an old man. Fast forward to 1912 and Dakota Aeronautics is getting ready to launch its biggest ship ever, the Dakota. On board is the elite of society as well as the general public. The Dakota family, consisting of Hollis and his mom and her new husband and his son Rob, are ready to set sail with the ship. During the voyage the ship is hijacked and Hollis, Rob and their friend Delia have to save the day.

This was a pretty hefty book with a lot going on. Not only do we have the hijacking story, but there is also a lot of backstory for when Samuel Dakota invented flight. I thought it was pretty inventive to have beetles be the mode of flight, especially ones who like to eat whiskey sap. There was definitely a Titanic vibe to this story (giant ship, best of its kind, supposedly unsinkable/uncrashable, disaster). I do with the book would have been just a tad shorter or better edited. I think a lot of the story of the kids running around the ship could have been condensed. That being said I also wish the ending would have been expanded a bit. You have 300 pages of the hijacking and just a couple pages of the crash and its aftermath. I also thought the story of Rob and his father kind of went off the rails a bit and its ending was just about the worst thing in the book. I think the book had potential and it was an enjoyable read, but the ending was too rushed with too many loose ends for my tastes. 

I received a copy of this book from Netgalley.

02. June 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Adult Books, Angie, Fiction, Mystery, Tracy

Identical by Scott Turow, read by Tracy, on 05/01/2014

IDENTICAL, based loosely on the myth of Castor and Pollux, is the story of identical twins Paul and Cass Giannis and the complex relationships between their family and their former neighbors, the Kronons. The novel focuses principally on events in 2008, when Paul is a candidate for Mayor of Kindle County, and Cass is released from the penitentiary, 25 years after pleading guilty to the murder of his girlfriend, Aphrodite Kronon. The plot centers on the re-investigation of Aphrodite’s murder, carried out together by Evon Miller, an ex-FBI agent who is the head of security for the Kronon family business ZP, and private investigator Tim Brodie, 81, a former homicide detective. The complex web of murder, sex, and betrayal-as only Scott Turow could weave-dramatically unfolds, and the chilling truth is revealed: people will believe what they want to believe.

01. June 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Children's Books, Fantasy, Fiction

The Forbidden Library by Django Wexler, read by Angie, on 05/31/2014

Alice is orphaned and sent to live with her uncle in the country. Uncle Geryon lives in The Library and has a fortress-like library filled with all manner of strange books. There are invisible servants and talking cats to add to the strange mix of the household. Alice discovers quite by accident that she is a Reader, a magician who can read herself into magic books. The books can be prisons for dangerous creatures or portals to other worlds. Alice tries to find out what happened to her father and what is happening to her. She doesn’t know who to trust and ends up working with Isaac, another young Reader who has snuck into the Library trying to locate a book. 

I love books like this that deal with books in a mysterious and dangerous way. Basically any book with Library in the title will get my attention, but it has to be quite enthralling to keep me reading. This one pushed all the right buttons. Alice is a spunky and smart girl who is not afraid of doing what’s right even when it hurts. She isn’t gullible or easily led, but thinks for herself and looks out for herself. I loved the idea of books as prisons and portals. I especially loved the cats. They are just as you would image magical cats to be full of attitude and mystery. This is the beginning of a series and leaves several questions unanswered, but I was ok with that. The main story is wrapped up nicely with just a few threads left dangling to keep your attention. Definitely a series to watch. 

01. June 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Children's Books, Contemporary Fiction, Fiction

Best Kept Secret by Ann M. Martin, read by Angie, on 05/31/2014

This book tells the story of Francie as she grows up in the 1970s and 80s. She has to deal with her parents’ divorce, her disabled uncle moving in, new friends, new schools, family feuds and all the things that come with growing up. This is the third book in this series; the previous two followed Francie’s mom and grandma. A lot of time is covered in this short novel. It starts with Francie starting school and ends with her married with a baby on the way. Unfortunately, the span of years really cuts down on the storytelling. Each chapter is basically a different year in her life so very little is actual told about what happens to her on a daily basis. It is more like a collection of vignettes than a fully fleshed-out story. There are things like the feud between family members that is mentioned but never really explained. And there is an incident when Francie is young where she is almost kidnapped and another girl disappears. This is mentioned several times but really never goes anywhere. I think the book would have been better served to tell Francie’s story through childhood with more attention to detail than to try and tell her entire life story in 200 pages. 

I received a copy of this book from Netgalley. 

29. May 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Children's Books, History, NonFiction

Buried Beneath Us: Discovering the Ancient Cities of the Americas by Anthony Aveni, Katherine Roy, read by Angie, on 05/28/2014

This book takes a look at the cities of four American cultures: Cahokia, Inca, Aztec, and Maya. The author goes over what cities are, how they developed, what life was like and the religions of these cultures. I really wanted to like this book more than I did. The author gives us a lot of good information, but unfortunately the organization of the book makes it very difficult to distinguish when the city changes. I think it might have better served the reader to perhaps do a chapter on each culture and its cities instead of breaking the chapters up like they were. I also thought the illustrations were horrible. There are no actual pictures of the ruins of these cities or their artifacts instead all the illustrations are a horrible gray block type that is a bit too abstract for the audience to appreciate. This is a fascinating subject that wasn’t served well by this book.

28. May 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Fiction, Paranormal, Teen Books

Antigoddess by Kendare Blake, read by Angie, on 05/28/2014

The old gods are dying. Hermes is wasting away, Athena has feathers growing inside her, and Demeter has become the floor of the desert. Athena and Hermes are on a quest to find out why they are dying. Demeter tells them to find Cassandra to help them. Cassandra is not an old one, she is a reincarnated prophetess living the life of a teenage girl with no idea who she once was. She is happy predicting sporting events and coin toss. She is happy with her boyfriend Aiden, her best friend Andi and her brother Harry. Her world is turned upside down when she starts having visions of gods dying or being attacked. She has no idea what is going on. Athena and Hermes track Cassandra through the witches of Circe (where they find Odysseus). Along the way they are attacked by Hera, Poseidon and Aphrodite who are waging war against them in the hopes of stopping their deaths. Cassandra is awoken to her true heritage once Athena gets a hold of her. She also finds out that Aiden is Apollo and he doesn’t appear to be dying like the other gods. She will have to decide whether to run or fight as war wages around her.

I absolutely loved Anna Dressed in Blood and Girl of Nightmares so I had high hopes for this book. I didn’t hate it, but I also didn’t love it. I thought it moved pretty slow. It is the beginning of a series so it is setting up who everyone is and what is happening, but not a whole lot happens other than that. It also ends in a bit of a strange place where you are not sure how things are going to play out in the future. I really enjoy books that put the old gods in the modern world and I enjoyed seeing how Athena and Hermes and the rest had adjusted to life today. I wish we would have gotten more backstory on what they had been doing for the last 2000 years and why they are suddenly dying after all this time. Maybe those questions will be answered in future books.

27. May 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Fantasy, Fiction, Teen Books

Unthinkable by Nancy Werlin, read by Angie, on 05/26/2014

Fanella has been trapped in Faerie for 400 years. The curse on her family has finally been broken, but she finds she is under another curse and she cannot die. Because Fanella started the curse on the Scarboroughs and doomed each generation of Scarborough women to be sent to Faerie, she feels she should die now that the curse has been broken by Lucy. The Faerie queen tells her she too must perform three acts in order to break her curse. Fanella jumps on the chance before she is told the acts must be of destruction and on her family in the human world. Fanella will do anything for the chance at death so she agrees. Then she is also told if she doesn’t complete the acts the original curse will be reinstated. Fanella goes to her family and convinces them she has been freed from Faerie. She begins her acts of destruction; first destroying safety, then love, then hope. All the while she is trying to work through her feelings for her family and her new feelings for Walker, the handsome friend of the family who has taken an interest in her. 

I didn’t love this book. Perhaps if I had read the first book where Lucy broke the curse I might have been more invested in it. I found I got really frustrated with Fanella’s tendency to just jump into things and not think them through. I loved her Faerie companion though. The Queen turns Ryland (her brother) into a cat and sends him into the human world to advise Fanella. He is full of snarky comments and truly adds a humorous touch to the book. I have to admit I was a bit disappointed in the ending as well. Fanella spends all her time working towards her death, but in the end chooses to live out her life (with Walker of course). I found it typical and not surprising but a bit of a muddle to the story. Not a bad book, just not my favorite.

27. May 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Children's Books, History, NonFiction

The Notorious Benedict Arnold: A True Story of Adventure, Heroism & Treachery by Steve Sheinkin, read by Angie, on 05/24/2014

What did I know about Benedict Arnold before reading this book? Very little. I knew he was a traitor, but I had no idea what he had actually done or who he was other than that. Turns out Benedict Arnold was a hero before he was a traitor and if he had been treated a little better history may have remembered him as the former instead of the latter. Benedict Arnold was a successful business man before the Revolutionary War. When the colonies decided to rebel against Britain he was one of the first to sign up and fight. He became a general in the army and led many successful campaigns. However, he was not well liked by some of the military authorities or by the colonial government. He was passed over for promotions, accused of crimes and even forced to stand trial. This was all partially his own fault as he was reckless and went against authority. He became embroiled in the plot to give Westpoint to the British because of the poor treatment he received. While his accomplices may have been caught, Arnold made it to British territory and eventually to England. His treatment was not all that much better however and his treachery may have been for naught. This book reads like an action/adventure novel. It is a bit long, so younger readers might find its size daunting. However, I think they would enjoy it once they get into it. Fans of history and adventure will enjoy this nonfiction work.

21. May 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Contemporary Fiction, Fiction, Teen Books

The F- It List by Julie Halpern, read by Angie, on 05/20/2014

Alex is not speaking to her best friend because she slept with her boyfriend the night of her dad’s funeral. So she spends the whole summer dealing with her grief over her dad. She goes back to school ready to forgive Becca only to find out she has cancer. So the friendship is back on and Becca shares her bucket list with Alex. They call it the f*** it list. Becca has been working on this list since she was 12 and it has a wide range of things she wants Alex to take care of for her. While Alex is working on the list, she starts hanging out with Leo. And when I say hanging out I really mean making out. Alex is obsessed with horror movies and Leo shares her love of the genre. But Alex is a very closed off person who comes off as not very nice. She doesn’t want to open herself up to her feelings for Leo and drives him away instead. 

This book didn’t end up being exactly what I thought it was going to be. I assumed it would be more about Alex and Becca’s relationship and dealing with Becca’s cancer. Instead it was more about Alex and Leo’s relationship and Alex dealing with her feelings. That was fine, but I felt like it was a little misleading. This is also not a book for the younger teen crowd. There is a LOT of language and a lot of talk about sex and a lot of well described make out sessions. Nothing wrong with that either, but it might shock (or educate) younger readers (and their parents). I enjoyed the story of Alex as she dealt with her grief over the loss of her dad, her fears about Becca and her new relationship with Leo. It was a fast read just not suitable for younger audiences. 

20. May 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, History, Informational Book, NonFiction

For the Good of Mankind?: The Shameful History of Human Medical Experimentation by Vicki O. Wittenstein, read by Angie, on 05/19/2014

How can you resist a title about human medical experimentation? This short little book was full of all kinds of information on medical experiments done on people with and without their knowledge. The majority of the experiments took place during the last century but there were a few from the 19th century mentioned. The book covers everything from Nazi concentration camps to radiation experiments during and after WWII to the Tuskegee Syphilis experiments. I think the most disturbing information however was the fact that there are still questionable experiments being done today. Regulations are much stiffer here in the United States so drug companies are outsourcing their medical experiments to 3rd world countries. I was fascinated by everything talked about here, but I did wish there had been a little bit more detail about some of the instances.

20. May 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Children's Books, Fantasy, Fiction

The Carpet People by Terry Pratchett, read by Angie, on 05/19/2014

The Carpet People was first written by Terry Pratchett when he was 17 years old. He reworked it and reissued it a few years ago. You can see his progression as a writer and a satirist in this early work. It has the beginnings of the depth and humor as his early Discworld books. You get a good idea of where his leanings lie and what message he wants to send out into the world through his books. I would be interested in reading the original version of this book just to see how it was finessed for the reissue.

The Carpet People tells the tale of the land of the carpet. It is populated by different groups of people, animals, monsters, kings and emperors. The Munrungs are a simple people led by Glurk. They are part of the Dumii Kingdom, but only in the sense they are counted and pay taxes. When The Fray destroys their village they take off across the Carpet. Along the way they discover the monsterous Mouls are ravaging the land on their vicious snarls. They help free the Deftmene people and they meet a mysterious Wight who sees all possible futures. Together they all band together to free the land of the terrible Mouls and to come up with a better system than kings and emperors. This story is part adventure, part fantasy, part political satire and all fun. Fans of Terry Pratchett will not go wrong with reading this early work. 

19. May 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Children's Books, Contemporary Fiction, Fiction, Historical Fiction

Seeing Red by Kathryn Erskine, read by Angie, on 05/19/2014

Red Porter comes from a long line of Porters. He is proud of his family heritage and his place in the world and his community. Then his daddy dies and suddenly mom is talking about moving them from Virginia to Ohio. Red doesn’t want to leave his home or the shop and store his daddy owned. He tries everything he can think of to stop his mom from selling even if that includes enlisting the help of Darryl Dunlop. The Dunlops have been the Porter’s neighbors for a hundred years and there has always been bad blood between. The Dunlops and Porters couldn’t be more different. The Porters are pillars of the community whereas the Dunlops beat their kids and cause trouble. 

Red is also having trouble reconciling the racism he sees in his community with his own beliefs. Red is learning that just because it is the 1970s that doesn’t mean racism is gone. There are still people who want to put Blacks in their place and keep them separated from the whites. Red is friends with Ms. Georgia, an old Black lady who lives up the road from his family. Her grandpa was murdered 100 years ago on land he was buying from the Porters. Red decides to try and solve the mystery of where the Freedom Church was and what really happened the night George Freeman was murdered. This leads him to some hard truths about his family and the Dunlops. 

There is a lot going on in this book. It is a book that would spark a lot of discussions on civil rights, women rights and racism. It is also a good discussion book on grief and how different people deal with a loved ones death. Red wants to hold onto everything related to his father, but his mother can’t stand being around everything without his father. I liked the progression of the characters. Red grows up a lot during the course of the book. He learns to stand up for what he believes in and not to give in to the bigots and racists. His mother also changes. She is devastated with grief at the beginning, barely able to function, but by the end she is strong and more than what she was.

For most of human history people believed the earth was the center of the universe and the sun, planets and stars all revolved around the earth. There were many different ideas of how the universe was set up but all of them followed the Biblical teachings that the earth was the center of everything. Then came some radical thinkers who tried to reconcile what they had learned with what they observed about the universe. They couldn’t get the two to match up. Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo and Newton all used science and observation to try and understand the universe. They and others like them were also persecuted by the Church and other scientists who believed the earth-centric configuration of the universe. I thought this was a very well-organized and interesting book. It was easy to follow and understand and I think it is perfect for kids starting to learn about the universe. I did think the last chapter on groups who still believe the earth is the center of the universe was a little less scientific explanation and a little more preachy, but other than that it was a great read.

15. May 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Award Winner, Children's Books, Fiction, Mystery · Tags:

The Westing Game by Ellen Raskin, read by Angie, on 05/15/2014

Sometimes I read a book and wonder what happened when I was a child that I missed reading it then. Maybe I was just too preoccupied by The Babysitters Club or Sweet Valley High and didn’t pay attention to books that might be considered quality. Maybe I only read things I could get through Scholastic Book Club. Whatever the case, I am glad I have the opportunity to read some of these as an adult and to introduce them to kids. 

The Westing Game is one of those books I never read as a kid but know I would have loved. It did when the Newbery when I was a pre-reader, but I am sure it was on every library shelf throughout my childhood. It is a wonderfully engaging mystery that reminded me a lot of the movie Clue (not an exact match I admit, but some elements were there). I liked that it is not a dumbed down mystery for kids, but one that made me think even as an adult. In the introduction, it states that Rankin never “wrote-down” to children, but instead wrote to the adult in children. I think this perfectly describes this book.

The story begins with the Sunset Towers and its new occupants. They are all carefully chosen, except for the mistake, and all are connected even though they do not realize it. Sunset Towers is in the shadow of the Westing House whose mysterious owner, Sam Westing, disappeared 20 years ago. Then Sam Westing is found dead in the house and the occupants of the Sunset Towers are notified that they are heirs to the Westing Fortune. The sixteen heirs are paired up and given clues to solve the mystery of who murdered Sam Westing. They winner of the Westing Game will receive the Westing fortune. Along the way we learn so much about each of the characters and their connections to each other and Sam Westing. In the end there is only one winner of the Westing Game, but everyone who plays benefits in some manner. 

15. May 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Children's Books, Informational Book, NonFiction

Plastic, Ahoy!: Investigating the Great Pacific Garbage Patch by Patricia Newman (Author), Annie Crawley (Photographer), read by Angie, on 05/15/2014

This is the type of nonfiction I really enjoy reading (maybe I just have the mind of a middle schooler!). It is on a fascinating subject I know little about. It contains all kinds of useful information with lots of pictures. And it isn’t so long that I lose interest. 

Plastic Ahoy is all about a scientific expedition called SEAPLEX that traveled out into the Pacific Ocean to investigate the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. The scientists onboard wanted to learn how the plastic was affecting the marine life. They investigated whether marine life was using the plastic and garbage as habitats, whether the marine life was consuming the plastic and what happened when it did, and if it was affecting the phytoplankton in the ocean. The book follows three scientists through their experiments and conclusions. It was very educational, but entertaining and interesting at the same time.