21. January 2015 · Write a comment · Categories: Autobiographies, Brian, NonFiction, Sports · Tags:

Open by Andre Aggasi, 388 pages, read by Brian, on 01/20/2015

andreOpen is a very sad book.  Andre talks about how he never wanted to play tennis and doesn’t really like sports.  How his father, in cruel way, pushed him to be a tennis player.  We also get to see how all those years of tennis has worn down his body.  Very good read.

 

06. January 2015 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Children's Books, Contemporary Fiction, Fiction, Sports

Fantasy League by Mike Lupica, 304 pages, read by Angie, on 01/05/2015

Charlie Gaines is a HUGE football fan. He loves everything about the game even if he doesn’t think he plays that well. He is best friends with Anna who is the granddaughter of Joe Warren, the owner of their beloved L.A. Bulldogs. Even though the Bulldogs aren’t doing very well, Charlie and Anna still cheer for them every game day. Charlie is also a fantasy football master. His picks for his fantasy teams always win. Anna convinces him to start a podcast where he can share all his football knowledge. She also convinces him to tell Joe what he thinks about the Bulldogs. This leads to the Bulldogs signing two of the players Charlie suggests. Suddenly Charlie is thrust into the spotlight and made out to be a football boy wonder.

Usually I don’t enjoy sports books very much, but this one really captured my attention. Sure I had no idea what was going on when Lupica was describing football plays, but I really didn’t care. It was the human part of this story that was so enjoyable. Charlie is a truly likeable character with his strengths and his weaknesses. Charlie doesn’t have a father so his growing friendship with Joe was really touching. I also liked Anna a lot. She was a strong female in a male dominated sport. She knew just as much as Charlie about football and wasn’t afraid to let him know it. This is a very strong story about following your heart, sticking with your gut and being a good friend. I think sports fans and non-sports fans alike can find something to like here.

05. January 2015 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Biographies, Children's Books, History, NonFiction, Sports

Babe Conquers the World: The Legendary Life of Babe Didrikson Zaharias by Rich Wallace, Sandra Neil Wallace, 272 pages, read by Angie, on 12/23/2014

Babe Didrikson Zaharias was a sports wonder. She excelled at pretty much any sport she attempted: basketball, running, high jump, bowling, golf. You name it and she probably tried it. She was a brash, outspoken, driven person who didn’t always make friends with her competitors or teammates. She had to overcome huge odds to make it in the sports world at a time when women were not thought to be athletically talented. I am not a sports person and had never heard of her before reading this book. I feel like I should have. She opened doors for women athletes and showed that women are just as good if not better than men!

10. October 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Brian, NonFiction, Sports · Tags:

100 Things Kansas Fans Should Know & Do Before They Die by Ken Davis, 307 pages, read by Brian, on 10/08/2014

heedAnother book about Jayhawk basketball and the rich tradition of the program.  Pay Heed To All That Enter the Phog, Allen Fieldhouse, home of the Jayhawks.  A must read for any Jayhawk fan.

 

10. October 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Brian, NonFiction, Sports · Tags:

What it Means to be a Jayhawk by Jeff Bollig, 240 pages, read by Brian, on 10/09/2014

jayhawkJeff goes into each decade talks about the important facts in Jayhawk sports.  Very fun and interesting read.  Rock Chalk.

 

03. October 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Brian, NonFiction, Sports · Tags:

Beyond the Phog by Jason King, 392 pages, read by Brian, on 10/03/2014

phogJason King has written a book about Jayhawk Nation what is very interesting he talks with with players and coaches and the transition from Roy Williams to Bill Self.  He covers the important issues of the time and gets the responses from all angles.

 

25. July 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Brian, NonFiction, Sports

Tiger, Meet My Sister by Rick Reilly, 368 pages, read by Brian, on 07/24/2014

reillyRick Reilly is a sports writer who is very funny.  His writings are so good, people who hate sports loves his books.  Tiger, Meet My Sister, Reilly compiles his best writings from ESPN for past five years.  I enjoy Rick because he doesn’t hold back.  He even has list of the nasty people he has interviewed.  Enjoyable read.

 

30. September 2013 · Comments Off · Categories: Autobiographies, NonFiction, Sports, Tracy

Bloody Confused by Chuck Culpepper, 272 pages, read by Tracy, on 09/29/2013

Chuck Culpepper was a veteran sports journalist edging toward burnout . . . then he went to London and discovered the high-octane, fanatical (and bloody confusing!) world of English soccer.

After covering the American sports scene for fifteen years, Chuck Culpepper suffered from a profound case of Common Sportswriter Malaise. He was fed up with self-righteous proclamations, steroid scandals, and the deluge of in-your-face PR that saturated the NFL, the NBA, and MLB. Then in 2006, he moved to London and discovered a new and baffling world—the renowned Premiership soccer league. Culpepper pledged his loyalty to Portsmouth, a gutsy, small-market team at the bottom of the standings. As he puts it, “It was like childhood, with beer.”

Writing in the vein of perennial bestsellers such as Fever Pitch andAmong the Thugs, Chuck Culpepper brings penetrating insight to the vibrant landscape of English soccer—visiting such storied franchises as Manchester United, Chelsea, and Liverpool . . . and an equally celebrated assortment of pubs. Bloody Confused! will put a smile on the face of any sports fan who has ever questioned what makes us love sports in the first place.

06. March 2012 · Comments Off · Categories: Brian, Self Help, Sports

I Cannot Except Not Trying by Michael Jordan, 36 pages, read by Brian, on 03/01/2012

There are very many books about Michael Jordan, he has written a few too. I Can’t Accept Not Trying is an inspirational book of Jordan’s wisdom he has learned playing collegiate and professional sports. This is a book you carry on your bookshelf and when times are tough, you take it, read it and be inspired by it.