Download2Now this is a marvelous book which uses the creative process to help readers visualize their dreams and bring them into their consciousness.  What better way for a creative person to dream than through art?  Ms. Gaynor’s three step process of dreaming, creating and reflecting is very beneficial.  Gaynor is a licensed therapist who uses art therapy to help women realize their dreams.  The book includes a year of monthly entries by artists using her process as well as a transformation deck and tips for creating your very own dream book.  There is so much information packed in this volume that I couldn’t hope to do it justice in this review.  Go to the MOBIUS catalog and pick it up.  It is well worth your while!

download (1)This little book is filled with fantastic tips for would-be freelance writers.  Everything from how to interact with editors to what types of pieces editors look for is covered.  The book is short and to the point.  There is no fluff.  I highly recommend it to anyone who is even thinking about diving into the freelance world.  It is guaranteed to not be a waste of time!

 

unleashing your inner dogThough this book came out in 2001 it definitely has a hippie or new age vibe going on especially in the art work. I was expecting a more humorous book, but it is more philosophical and about how to have a relaxed, joyful outlook on life no matter what is happening. Mari Stein shares her observations of her dogs’ joy in the every day: eating, chasing a stick, leaping for a Frisbee are all approached with the same open honesty. Dogs truly are nature’s pure examples of unconditional love and loyalty.

16. September 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Informational Book, Lisa, NonFiction, Self Help · Tags:

Free-Range Kids by Lenore Skenazy, 225 pages, read by Lisa, on 09/15/2014

“FREE RANGE KIDS” has become a national movement, sparked by the incredible response to Lenore Skenazy’s piece about allowing her 9-year-old ride the subway alone in NYC. Parent groups argued about it, bloggers, blogged, spouses became uncivil with each other, and the media jumped all over it. A lot of parents today, Skenazy says, see no difference between letting their kids walk to school and letting them walk through a firing range. Any risk is seen as too much risk. But if you try to prevent every possible danger or difficult in your child’s everyday life, that child never gets a chance to grow up. We parents have to realize that the greatest risk of all just might be trying to raise a child who never encounters choice or independence.

07. July 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Brian, NonFiction, Self Help · Tags:

Grieving the Death of a Mother by Harold Ivan Smith, 147 pages, read by Brian, on 07/07/2014

motherAnyone who has to deal with the death of their mother knows you never get over just deal with it a positive manner. Smith’s book is written in an honest and kind way.  I thought I was prepared for my mother’s passing but after she died I was fill with so many emotions my mind became a jumbled mess.  This book helped me realize my jumbled mess is normal and showed me how deal with the sorrow.

03. July 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Kristy, NonFiction, Self Help

The Money Book for the Young, Fabulous & Broke by Suze Orman, 400 pages, read by Kristy, on 06/05/2014

The world’s most trusted expert on money matters answers a generation’s cry for help-and gives advice on

- Credit card debt
- Student loans
- Credit scores
- The first real job
- Buying a first home
- Insurance facts: auto, home, renters, health
- Financial issues of the self-employed

And much more advice that fits the realities of “Generation Broke.”

03. July 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Inspirational, Kira, NonFiction, Self Help · Tags:

How Then, Shall We Live?: Four Simple Questions That Reveal the Beauty and Meaning of Our Lives by Wayne Muller, 304 pages, read by Kira, on 06/30/2014

Muller’s book is divided into four sections framed by the following four questions:

1. Who am I? what is my identity.

2. What do I love?

3. How Shall I live, knowing that I shall die?

4. What gifts shall I leave behind to the Earth?

 

Muller then took these meaningmaking questions and explored the questions.  I particularly liked question number three.  howlive ua2020-final-report-cover-shothow-then-should-we-live 10-truths-before-happiness how-to-stay-on-track-to-a-meaningful-life-L-Yzz2TS images Though, love-my-way-out-lI didn’t agree with all of his statements/thoughts, for example, he said that EVERY single moment is a gift, I found these food for thought.  I highly recommend this title!

19. June 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Informational Book, Kira, NonFiction, Science, Self Help · Tags:

The Story of the Human Body: Evolution, Health, and Disease by Daniel E. Lieberman, 460 pages, read by Kira, on 06/16/2014

humbod  Fabulous HominidTimelinediabetesWhats-the-Paleo-Diet-3book!  The first half recounts the changes in human physiology, from the time we first diverged from apes (chimpanzees specifically) to modern times. Dr Lieberman discusses the physical adaptations and what they mean for the way our bodies function.  Then he takes this history of the human body and shows us evolutionary mismatches between our physiology and our modern lifestyle, first starting with the foods we eat, and then discussing our bodies needs to be physically active, that we were born to run/walk long distances, and that our bodies suffer if we fail to be active.  For example he notes that people that run barefoot, rarely suffer foot injuries, in contrast to runners that wear shoes (barefooters also hit with the ball of the foot first, unlike shod runners who strike with their heel).  Type II Diabetes, Heart disease, and cancer are discussed in detail.  I found it especially interesting how our bodies process different types of foods, how damaging starches and carbs are, compared to protein, fat, fiber, and how the composition of what you eat, affects whether it is sent for fat storage, whether it triggers insulin shock or absorbed slowly and more healthily.

16. May 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: How To's, Informational Book, Inspirational, Marsha, NonFiction, Self Help

Show Your Work! 10 Ways to Share Your Creativity and Get Discovered by Austin Kleon, 224 pages, read by Marsha, on 05/06/2014

showThis book, a follow-up to Steal Like an Artist, continues Kleon’s advice on creativity by encouraging artists everywhere to show their work.  This particular volume discusses the value of sharing work in online communities through blogs and other social media.  Not only does the artist make work public in this way, but he or she also shares with others a bit about process and how the work is made.  I found this book to be just as valuable a resource as the first and have already read it twice.  It is inspirational and will have artists everywhere wanting to get up and share what they do with others.  As Kleon notes, the world owes us nothing.  We have to give selflessly in order to get and this book will show the reader how.  I highly recommend Kleon’s work to artists of all kinds.  Create–share.  What a fun cycle to be in!

31. March 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Lisa, NonFiction, Self Help

Mating in Captivity: Reconciling the Erotic and the Domestic by Esther Perel, 272 pages, read by Lisa, on 03/05/2014

One of the world’s most respected voices on erotic intelligence, Esther Perel offers a bold, provocative new take on intimacy and sex. Mating in Captivity invites us to explore the paradoxical union of domesticity and sexual desire, and explains what it takes to bring lust home.

Drawing on more than twenty years of experience as a couples therapist, Perel examines the complexities of sustaining desire. Through case studies and lively discussion, Perel demonstrates how more exciting, playful, and even poetic sex is possible in long-term relationships. Wise, witty, and as revelatory as it is straightforward, Mating in Captivity is a sensational book that will transform the way you live and love.

01. March 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Adult Books, Fairy Tales and Folklore, Fiction, Inspirational, Kira, Self Help, Short Stories

The Late Bloomer: Myths & Stories of the Wise Woman Archetype by Clarissa Pinkola Estes, 380 pages, read by Kira, on 02/28/2014

late bloomer  Clarissa Pinkola Estes examines archetypal themes in fairy tales relevant to unleashing creativity and letting your unique talents blossom. Estes uses a combination of Jungian psychology together with family wisdom to explain the significance of various tales.  I learned that she had been held at gunpoint down in Guatemala, during a period of civil unrest, listening to her inner voice/angel, she eventually started singing to her kidnappers, who let her go, saying the singing was driving them nuts. She finishes each chapter with a blessing.  I really liked this title, As it was so deep & rich, I wouldn’t want to read several back to back.  I really clientImg_estesenjoyed this book, & feel cactslike I benefited from her wisdom.

07. February 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Inspirational, Kristy, NonFiction, Self Help

The Four Agreements: A Practical Guide to Personal Freedom by Miguel Ruiz, 168 pages, read by Kristy, on 01/01/2014

In The Four Agreements, don Miguel Ruiz reveals the source of self-limiting beliefs that rob us of joy and create needless suffering. Based on ancient Toltec wisdom, the Four Agreements offer a powerful code of conduct that can rapidly transform our lives to a new experience of freedom, true happiness, and love. The Four Agreements are: Be Impeccable With Your Word, Don’t Take Anything Personally, Don’t Make Assumptions, Always Do Your Best.

31. January 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: How To's, Kira, NonFiction, Self Help

Creative visualization : use the power of your imagination to create what you want in your life by Shakti Gawain , 128 pages, read by Kira, on 01/27/2014

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A pioneer in the world consciousness effort, Shakti Gawain details the practical technique of using mental imagery and affirmation to produce positive life changes.  creative-visualization-complete-book-on-tape-shakti-gawain-audio-cover-artThis includes the Pink Bubble Technique, Grounding and Runnbook covering Energy.  I find these exercises very useful and recommend work by Shakti Gawain.Visualization

29. November 2013 · Comments Off · Categories: Informational Book, Inspirational, Noelle, NonFiction, Self Help · Tags: ,

The Lost Art of Compassion by Lorne Ladner, 304 pages, read by Noelle, on 11/27/2013

Western culture has long sidelined compassion as the province of the saintly or the overly naive. To our great detriment, we have overlooked one of our most powerful inner resources for creating a life of happiness and contentment. In The Lost Art of Compassion, clinical psychologist and longtime Tibetan Buddhist practitioner Lorne Ladner rescues compassion from the margins, and demonstrates its direct and powerful benefits for our day-to-day lives. Until recently Western psychology focused almost exclusively on working with unhealthy emotions and relationships, turning very little of its research or expertise toward understanding positive emotional states. While interest in positive psychology is just dawning in the West, the cultivation of compassion has been a cornerstone of Tibetan Buddhism, studied and developed for over a thousand years. The Lost Art of Compassion is the first book to incorporate the Tibetan Buddhist teachings most suited to Westerners and provides a crucial perspective that is sorely lacking in Western psychology. Bringing together the best contributions of psychology and Buddhism, Dr. Ladner bridges the gap between East and West, theory and practice, in this user-friendly guide for getting through each day with greater contentment and ease. The Lost Art of Compassion offers ten methods for cultivating joy and contentment, bringing directly applicable wisdom to everyday situations. The result is a highly practical, engaging guide that weaves together these two disciplines and encourages readers to reclaim this neglected path to happiness.

01. November 2013 · Comments Off · Categories: Noelle, NonFiction, Self Help

Your Survival Instinct is Killing You by Marc Schoen, 272 pages, read by Noelle, on 10/20/2013

Thanks to technology, we live in a world that’s much more comfortable than ever before. But here’s the paradox:  our tolerance for discomfort is at an all-time low. And as we wrestle with a sinking “discomfort threshold,” we increasingly find ourselves at the mercy of our primitive instincts and reactions that can perpetuate disease, dysfunction, and impair performance and decision making.

Designed to keep us out of danger, our limbic brain’s Survival Instinct controls what we intuitively do to avert injury or death, such as running out of a burning building.   Rarely are we required to recruit this instinct today because seldom do we find ourselves in situations that are truly life-threatening. However, this part of our brain is programmed to naturally and automatically react to even the most benign forms of discomfort and stress as serious threats to our survival.

In this seminal book we learn how the Survival Instinct is the culprit that triggers a person to overeat, prevents the insomniac from sleeping, causes the executive to unravel under pressure, leads travelers to avoid planes or freeways, inflames pain, and due to past heartache, closes down an individual to love.  In all of these cases, their overly-sensitive Survival Instinct is being called into action at the slightest hint of discomfort.  In short, their Survival Instinct is stuck in the “ON” position…with grave consequences.

Your Survival Is Killing You can transform the way you live. Provocative, eye-opening, and surprisingly practical with its gallery of strategies and ideas, this book will show you how to build up your “instinctual muscles” for successfully managing discomfort while taming your overly reactive Survival Instinct. You will learn that the management of discomfort is the single most important skill for the twenty-first century.    This book is, at its heart, a modern guide to survival.

30. September 2013 · Comments Off · Categories: Autobiographies, Informational Book, Kira, NonFiction, Science, Self Help

The Autistic Brain : Thinking across the Spectrum by Temple Grandin and Richard Panek, 240 pages, read by Kira, on 09/28/2013

Temple Grandin does for Autism what Susan Cain did for Introversion.  Grandin shows us the strengths associated with Autistic and Asperger’s syndrome, citing research showing superior ability to focus on details.  She suggests that we quit seeing only the deficits, but acknowledge that some characteristics are actually strengths.  Her attention is limited to high-functioning  end of the spectrum while, the lower end of the spectrum is given short shrift.  She backs up most of her arguments with scientific research (though a few times, she just says “That doesn’t make sense” without showing why).  IntertempleGesting, but not as enjoyable asclaire-danes-and-temple-grandin_original Anibrainmals in Translation.

10. July 2013 · Comments Off · Categories: Informational Book, Inspirational, Kira, NonFiction, Self Help · Tags:

The power of vulnerability: teachings on authenticity, connection, & courage by Brené Brown, 225 pages, read by Kira, on 06/30/2013

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Brene Brown’s latest work debunks the myth that showing vulnerability is weakness, rather it takes courage to be vulnerable.  At the end she provides guideposts to living wholeheartedly.

Brene Brown has a couple of fabulous talks on TED.  I recomend starting with this one http://www.ted.com/talks/brene_brown_on_vulnerability.html  its been viewed over 10 million times!  I think she is profound.

Some of her quotes:

Want to be happy? Stop trying to be perfect.

You either walk inside your story and own it, or you stand outside, your story & hustle for your worthiness.

power of vulnerability

brenee

Then there’s a Teddy Roosevelt quote that she likes.

It is not the critic who counts; not the one who points out how the strong person stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the one who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, and comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if zhe fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that their place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat.

vulnerab  Brene

31. May 2013 · Comments Off · Categories: Informational Book, Kristy, NonFiction, Self Help

The cure for everything : untangling twisted messages about health, fitness, and happiness by Timothy Caulfield, 234 pages, read by Kristy, on 05/30/2013

indexCA6OFCENIn this book, Timothy Caulfield takes on the ginormous task of sifting through all of the health information out there in order to present his audience with genuine, unbiased facts on how to improve health. He debunks common weight loss misconceptions like “exercising helps you lose weight.” According to his research, exercise stimulates appetite, causing people to eat as much or more calories than they burn exercising. Exercising alone rarely results in weight loss. He also bashes workout methods such as yoga and Pilates, saying that they provide little in the way of exercise. In order for your workout to be beneficial, it needs to involve intense interval training. As for diet, he states what many have stated before him: dieters must eat smaller portion sizes and avoid poison-foods (junk food). While I liked the humor sprinkled throughout this book, I didn’t find it particularly revolutionary. But perhaps that’s because I’m a bit of a health-freak and I try to stay on top of health-related information. To someone relatively unacquainted with the health world, this book could be pretty informative.

11. May 2013 · Comments Off · Categories: Informational Book, Kristy, NonFiction, Self Help

The Normal Bar by Chrisanna Northrup, 290 pages, read by Kristy, on 05/14/2013

The Normal Bar is an insightful book that gives readers the chance to peek into the relationships of thousands of couples in America and across the globe. the normal barCombining statistics and participant comments, this book presents the reader with what is “normal” in relationships today. Highly recommended.

08. January 2013 · Comments Off · Categories: Informational Book, Kira, NonFiction, Science, Self Help

The Invisible Gorilla: How Our Intuitions Deceive Us by Chabris, Christopher F., 306 pages, read by Kira, on 01/08/2013

invis gorilaYou probably think you would notice if a Gorilla came onto a basketball court, and beat its chest-center stage right? Actually chances are pretty good that if you were counting bounce passes versus aerial passes, you would miss the gorilla – yep 50% of people don’t notice the gorilla.  We think we know how our minds work, but this proves to be an illusion.  Know exactly where you were at, and who you talked to on 9/11?  We feel pretty certain about our memories for these things, but again, the more certain we are about our memories, the less likely they are to be accurate. Read this book to figure out where your blind spots are!