14. January 2015 · Comments Off · Categories: Autobiographies, Humor, Memoirs, Noelle, NonFiction

Yes Please by Amy Poehler, 329 pages, read by Noelle, on 01/08/2015

In a perfect world . . .

We’d get to hang out with Amy Poehler, watching dumb movies, listening to music, and swapping tales about our coworkers and difficult childhoods. Because in a perfect world, we’d all be friends with Amy—someone who seems so fun, is full of interesting stories, tells great jokes, and offers plenty of advice and wisdom (the useful kind, not the annoying kind you didn’t ask for, anyway). Unfortunately, between her Golden Globe-winning role on Parks and Recreation, work as a producer and director, place as one of the most beloved SNL alumni and cofounder of the Upright Citizens’ Brigade, involvement with the website Smart Girls at the Party, frequent turns as acting double for Meryl Streep, and her other gig as the mom of two young sons, she’s not available for movie night.

Luckily we have the next best thing: Yes Please, Amy’s hilarious and candid book. A collection of stories, thoughts, ideas, lists, and haikus from the mind of one of our most beloved entertainers, Yes Please offers Amy’s thoughts on everything from her “too safe” childhood outside of Boston to her early days in New York City, her ideas about Hollywood and “the biz,” the demon that looks back at all of us in the mirror, and her joy at being told she has a “face for wigs.” Yes Please is chock-full of words and wisdom to live by.

Descriptive content provided by Syndetics™, a Bowker service.

 

12. January 2015 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, History, Informational Book, NonFiction · Tags: ,

Haunted Air: Anonymous Halloween photographs from c. 1875–1955 by Ossian Brown, David Lynch (Introduction), Geoff Cox (Afterword), 216 pages, read by Angie, on 01/12/2015

So I saw this book on Goodreads and just had to check it out. It looked super creepy and I was not disappointed. There is just something about these old photographs of people in homemade Halloween costumes that ups the creep factor to about 11. I have no idea what most of the costumes are nor do I want to know. The sepia color of the photos makes everything just a little bit more bizarre and demonic. If I saw any of these costumes at my door on Halloween I think I would lock the door and hide in the closet for the rest of the night.

11. January 2015 · Comments Off · Categories: Fiction, Kira, Teen Books, Teen Books · Tags:

Eleanor and Park by Rainbow Rowell, 328 pages, read by Kira, on 01/08/2015

What a wonderful read!  Fast paced, emotionally gripping.  A love story – Not a romance.  I’m going to have to devour everything else Rainbow Rowell has written.

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09. January 2015 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Humor, Informational Book, NonFiction

I Work at a Public Library: A Collection of Crazy Stories from the Stacks by Gina Sheridan, 157 pages, read by Angie, on 01/08/2015

Ahh, the joys of working in a public library. You just never know what kind of crazy, sweet, angry, beautiful people you are going to encounter day to day. Gina Sheridan has collected stories about her experiences working in the library in this little gem of a book. I really enjoyed the fact that she categorized the stories by the Dewey Decimal System. While my experiences are not the same as Sheridan’s I can definitely relate to them. Public libraries are open to the public and that just means anyone and everyone can be there. Some days are a delight when you find the right book for a patron or help them with a sticky problem. Other days are a chore when you get yelled at or sneezed on or have to deal with too many frustrating situations. Each day is different and makes coming to work interesting.

08. January 2015 · Comments Off · Categories: Courtney, NonFiction, Teen Books

Girls Standing On Lawns by Daniel Handler and Maira Kalman, 64 pages, read by Courtney, on 12/13/2015

This charming little book is a three-way collaboration amongst artist Maira Kalman, writer Daniel Handler and the Museum of Modern Art. The theme is, obviously, “girls standing on lawns” and is illustrated by Handler’s poetic interludes, Kalman’s paintings and photographs of girls who are, quite literally, standing on lawns. Just about everyone who grew up in a household with a camera has one or more pictures of themselves in just such a setting. I know that I personally have many pictures of myself standing on a lawn (first days of school, school dances, etc.), as do my mother and her mother. These particular photos are all from a more distant past, largely the ’30s-’50s. Kalman’s paintings are her own take on some of the photos (the originals of which appear in the back of the book).
A very fast read, Girls Standing on Lawns is an interesting experiment in form. The short vignettes of text evoke a sense of potentiality for the girls in the photos. These girls are going somewhere, preparing for something – just as any of us would have been in our pictures. We don’t know who the girls are or where they’re from, but these snapshots into their lives reveal intriguing bits of personality and remind us of ourselves. Notes from the collaborators and credits for the artwork follow the main text.

08. January 2015 · Comments Off · Categories: Brian, History, NonFiction · Tags: ,

Irish Witchcraft and Demonology by John D. Seymour, 256 pages, read by Brian, on 01/08/2015

irishThis is a fascinating book.  Seymour documents different people who were known for their witchcraft or people thought they were practicing.  He explores the history of when witchcraft first appeared in Ireland.  Fascinating to some people and maybe a bore to others.

 

06. January 2015 · Comments Off · Categories: Madeline, Memoirs, NonFiction

The Unspeakable and Other Subjects of Discussion by Meghan Daum, 256 pages, read by Madeline, on 12/20/2014

Nearly fifteen years after her debut collection, My Misspent Youth, captured the ambitions and anxieties of a generation, Meghan Daum returns to the personal essay with The Unspeakable, a masterful collection of ten new works. Her old encounters with overdrawn bank accounts and oversized ambitions in the big city have given way to a new set of challenges. The first essay, “Matricide,” opens without flinching:

People who weren’t there like to say that my mother died at home surrounded by loving family. This is technically true, though it was just my brother and me and he was looking at Facebook and I was reading a profile of Hillary Clinton in the December 2009 issue of Vogue.

Elsewhere, she carefully weighs the decision to have children—“I simply felt no calling to be a parent. As a role, as my role, it felt inauthentic and inorganic”—and finds a more fulfilling path as a court-appointed advocate for foster children. In other essays, she skewers the marriage-industrial complex and recounts a harrowing near-death experience following a sudden illness. Throughout, Daum pushes back against the false sentimentality and shrink-wrapped platitudes that surround so much of contemporary American experience and considers the unspeakable thoughts many of us harbor—that we might not love our parents enough, that “life’s pleasures” sometimes feel more like chores, that life’s ultimate lesson may be that we often learn nothing.

But Daum also operates in a comic register. With perfect precision, she reveals the absurdities of the New Age search for the “Best Possible Experience,” champions the merits of cream-of mushroom-soup casserole, and gleefully recounts a quintessential “only-in-L.A.” story of playing charades at a famous person’s home.

Combining the piercing insight of Joan Didion with humor reminiscent of Nora Ephron’s, Daum dissects our culture’s most dangerous illusions, blind spots, and sentimentalities while retaining her own joy and compassion. Through it all, she dramatizes the search for an authentic self in a world where achieving an identity is never simple and never complete.

Description from Goodreads.com

06. January 2015 · Comments Off · Categories: Cookbooks, Madeline, NonFiction

International Night: A Father and Daughter Cook Their Way Around the World by Mark Kurlansky, Talia Kurlansky, 384 pages, read by Madeline, on 12/10/2014

Once a week in the Kurlansky home, Mark spins a globe and wherever his daughter’s finger lands becomes the theme of that Friday night’s dinner. Their tradition of International Night has afforded Mark an opportunity to share with his daughter, Talia–and now the readers of International Night–the recipes, stories, and insights he’s collected over more than thirty years of traveling the world writing about food, culture, and history, and his charming pen-and-ink drawings, which appear throughout the book.

International Night is brimming with recipes for fifty-two special meals–appetizers, a main course, side dishes, and dessert for each–one for every week of the year. Some are old favorites from Mark’s repertoire, and others gleaned from research. Always, they are his own version, drawn from techniques he learned as a professional chef and from many years of talking to chefs, producers, and household cooks around the world. Despite these insights, every recipe is designed to be carried out–easily–by any amateur chef, and they are designed to be completed with the assistance of children.

Mark and Talia invite you and your family into their kitchen, outfitted with overflowing packets of exotic spices and aromas of delicacies from Tanzania and Kazakhstan to Cuba and Norway. From there, recipes and toothsome morsels of cultural and historical information will fill your bellies and your minds, and transport you to countries all around the world.

Description from Goodreads.com

06. January 2015 · Comments Off · Categories: Brian, Informational Book, NonFiction · Tags:

Outsourcing Technology by Robin Hastings, 107 pages, read by Brian, on 01/03/2015

techRobin Hastings, is an acclaimed speaker, writer, blogger and technology person, her books are easy to read and understand and this is no different for, Outsourcing Technology:  A Practical Guide for Librarians.  With this book libraries can learn to be more effective and resourceful.  In return this will save libraries money and make the library a better run organization.  If you are a Library administrator or an IT Manager check this book out.

 

06. January 2015 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Children's Books, Contemporary Fiction, Fiction, Sports

Fantasy League by Mike Lupica, 304 pages, read by Angie, on 01/05/2015

Charlie Gaines is a HUGE football fan. He loves everything about the game even if he doesn’t think he plays that well. He is best friends with Anna who is the granddaughter of Joe Warren, the owner of their beloved L.A. Bulldogs. Even though the Bulldogs aren’t doing very well, Charlie and Anna still cheer for them every game day. Charlie is also a fantasy football master. His picks for his fantasy teams always win. Anna convinces him to start a podcast where he can share all his football knowledge. She also convinces him to tell Joe what he thinks about the Bulldogs. This leads to the Bulldogs signing two of the players Charlie suggests. Suddenly Charlie is thrust into the spotlight and made out to be a football boy wonder.

Usually I don’t enjoy sports books very much, but this one really captured my attention. Sure I had no idea what was going on when Lupica was describing football plays, but I really didn’t care. It was the human part of this story that was so enjoyable. Charlie is a truly likeable character with his strengths and his weaknesses. Charlie doesn’t have a father so his growing friendship with Joe was really touching. I also liked Anna a lot. She was a strong female in a male dominated sport. She knew just as much as Charlie about football and wasn’t afraid to let him know it. This is a very strong story about following your heart, sticking with your gut and being a good friend. I think sports fans and non-sports fans alike can find something to like here.

05. January 2015 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Children's Books, History, NonFiction

The Port Chicago 50: Disaster, Mutiny, and the Fight for Civil Rights by Steve Sheinkin, 208 pages, read by Angie, on 12/27/2014

Segregation and racism were alive and well during WWII. That didn’t stop thousands of young black men from joining the military to fight for their country. Almost all of these men were assigned menial jobs and deemed not fit for combat. In the Navy, that meant stateside duties instead of serving on ships. This book is about the group of men who loaded ammunition onto war ships at Port Chicago. They were all black with white officers. The men had no training in munitions or ship loading. The conditions were dangerous and that danger caught up to the port one evening. On July 17, 1944 the port exploded killing over 300 soldiers. It destroyed two ships and the entire port. Every man in the port area died. Those on the base that survived were not very happy about going back to work after the disaster. This is the story of the 50 men who refused to load ammunition again. They were charged with mutiny and went on trial. The trial found them all guilty of mutiny even though it didn’t seem like their actions fit the definition of mutiny. There were even men charged who refused to load munitions because they weren’t capable and had never loaded before: a cook, an injured man, an underweight man. Didn’t seem like it mattered why they refused the order they were still charged. Thurgood Marshall and the NAACP became involved in the case and tried to get the charges dropped on the basis of racism, but were unsuccessful. Even though this case made the Navy rethink its segregation policies and eventually led to the integration of the Navy, the men’s records were never cleared of the charges. It is a sad part of our history and one Sheinkin did a fabulous job covering. Highly readable with lots of interesting information.

05. January 2015 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Biographies, Children's Books, History, NonFiction, Sports

Babe Conquers the World: The Legendary Life of Babe Didrikson Zaharias by Rich Wallace, Sandra Neil Wallace, 272 pages, read by Angie, on 12/23/2014

Babe Didrikson Zaharias was a sports wonder. She excelled at pretty much any sport she attempted: basketball, running, high jump, bowling, golf. You name it and she probably tried it. She was a brash, outspoken, driven person who didn’t always make friends with her competitors or teammates. She had to overcome huge odds to make it in the sports world at a time when women were not thought to be athletically talented. I am not a sports person and had never heard of her before reading this book. I feel like I should have. She opened doors for women athletes and showed that women are just as good if not better than men!

05. January 2015 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Children's Books, Informational Book, NonFiction

Sniffer Dogs: How Dogs (and Their Noses) Save the World by Nancy F. Castaldo , 160 pages, read by Angie, on 12/23/2014

Sniffer Dogs is a delightful little book about working dogs. Nancy Castaldo does a great job illustrating the different jobs a dog’s nose is perfect for. Dogs can be trained to sniff out bombs, arson, people, dead bodies, and even illness. I really enjoyed the stories about actual working dogs and their partners. This book is kid friendly with lots of pictures and pop-outs of dogs, short chapters and lively text.

05. January 2015 · Comments Off · Categories: Cats, How To's, Informational Book, Kira, NonFiction

Catification: Designing a Happy and Stylish Home for Your Cat (and You!) by Jackson Galaxy and Kate Benjamin, 291 pages, read by Kira, on 12/31/2014

51u6aQwkMxL._SX258_BO1,204,203,200_ 9780399166013_IL_3-300x217 CarolsFerals1 3546954 Alinta VickisDiningRoom-Before-lr VickisDiningRoom4-after-lrThis is a how-to-book showing you ways to make your abode more liveable for you and your cats.  This is especially important if you live in a small space – like an apartment – and if your cats cannot go outside.  But it involves a fair amount of construction, including attaching hangers to the walls, so that might be a problem for some apartment renters.  One of the first couple examples depicts the makeover for a man who lived with 2 Savannah cats, one of whom was launching himself on top of the range hood that hung from the middle of the ceiling.

 

I need to figure out some catification to keep my cat off the kitchen counter where he looks for more catfood – maybe I’ll try some perfume .

05. January 2015 · Comments Off · Categories: Informational Book, Kira, NonFiction, Self Help

Think Like a Freak: The Authors of Freakonomics Offer to Retrain your Brain by Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner., 268 pages, read by Kira, on 12/17/2014

images  Screen-Shot-2014-05-07-at-9.50.30-AM   The Authors of Freakonomics and Super Freakonomics explain how you can apply some of their techniques to your own life.  I liked the example of the young man from Japan who won the Coney Island hot-dog eating contest.  By methodically studying himself, he figured out, how to be able to eat twice as many hot-dogs (plus buns) to beat native American contestants.  After a couple of years, other contestantfreaks watched his methods and eventually beat him, by using the techniques he’d figured out.

Another topic covered is you need to understand what really motivates people, which is often quite different from what people will tell you, even different from what hqdefaultthey believe about themselves.  For example, when a soccer player gets a penalty kick, will they be aiming for the spot most likely to score a point – statistically this would be right at the goalie –  or someplace else, likely to make a point, but if it fails, they won’t look images2like an idiot.  I enjoyed this book.

04. January 2015 · Comments Off · Categories: Contemporary Fiction, Fiction, Katy, Teen Books

Where She Went by Gayle Forman, 260 pages, read by Katy, on 01/03/2015

thIt’s been three years since the devastating accident . . . three years since Mia walked out of Adam’s life forever.

Now living on opposite coasts, Mia is Juilliard’s rising star and Adam is LA tabloid fodder, thanks to his new rock star status and celebrity girlfriend. When Adam gets stuck in New York by himself, chance brings the couple together again, for one last night. As they explore the city that has become Mia’s home, Adam and Mia revisit the past and open their hearts to the future – and each other.

Told from Adam’s point of view in the spare, lyrical prose that defined If I Stay, Where She Went explores the devastation of grief, the promise of new hope, and the flame of rekindled romance.

From www.goodreads.com. 

03. January 2015 · Comments Off · Categories: Autobiographies, NonFiction, Sarah, Teen Books

Positive by Paige Rawl, 272 pages, read by Sarah, on 12/28/2015

Paige Rawl is a courageous young lady who is positive for HIV.  She was born with HIV and took meds everyday since she was three, but didn’t know of her diagnosis until she was in the 6th grade.  This memoir is deeply moving about how ignorance can breed hatred and bullying situations that are completely uncalled for.  Many of her “friends” turned on her after finding out about her HIV status, and this sent her on a roller coaster of despair as she tried to cope emotionally while acting like everything was ok.  This goes to show you that even a positive, optimistic person can be devastated by bullies and overcome the worst.  This is a must read.

31. December 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Humor, Kristy, NonFiction

I work at a public library: a collection of crazy stories from the stacks by Gina Sheridan, 157 pages, read by Kristy, on 12/31/2014

From a patron’s missing wetsuit to the scent of crab cakes wafting through the stacks, Sheridan showcases the oddities that have come across her circulation desk: encounters with local eccentrics; bizarre reference requests; and heart-warming stories of patrons who roam the stacks every day.

(goodreads.com)

51Pd1TfIeIL._AA160_Interviews with some of today’s greatest authors–that is what you will find inside these pages.  Ever wonder what authors read?  Now is your chance!  This book not only discusses what they read, but also answers questions about their writing life and guilty pleasures.  They are also asked questions about favorite books from their childhoods and which books are next on their reading lists.  Take some time and learn more about some of your favorite authors or just read the whole book from beginning to end.  You won’t regret the time you spend with By the Book!

 

31. December 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Judy, NonFiction, True Crime

Murder in the Heartland by M. William Phelps, 447 pages, read by Judy, on 12/30/2014

On a December night in 2004, a 911 operator in Nodaway County, Missouri, received a frantic call from a woman who’d found her pregnant 23-year-old daughter in a pool of blood on the living room floor.    Most shocking of all, the dying woman’s unborn baby had been viciously ripped from her womb.

Across the border in Melvern, Kansas, Lisa Montgomery showed off a beautiful newborn she proudly claimed as her own.   While some shared her excitement, others harbored suspicions. Meanwhile televisions across the nation broadcast the first Amber Alert for an unborn child.

Newly updated with the latest surprising developments, Murder in the Heartland, goes behind the scenes of two picture-perfect American towns forever changed by one horrifying act of violence.    With exclusive access to key witnesses, family members, and potential victims who narrowly escaped a similar gruesome fate, M. William Phelps tells a classic American tale of unthinkable murder and the quest for justice.