07. November 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Brian, Informational Book, NonFiction · Tags:

Making the Most of the Cloud by Robin Hastings, 95 pages, read by Brian, on 11/06/2014

cloudWhen mention “The Cloud”, many people will give you a blank stare and look up to the sky.  MS. Hastings has brought to cover an easy to understand book about the cloud and how to use it effectively in a library setting.

 

05. November 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Fantasy, Fiction, Sarah, Teen Books

Complete Nothing by Kieran Scott, 310 pages, read by Sarah, on 11/03/2014

  What happens when a goddess is banished to earth by Zeus?  Does she still have her powers?  Or will she be on her own to complete her tasks at hand?  True (Eros) was banished to earth and has to match 3 couples before she can be restored to the heavens.  This wouldn’t be so bad, except, the love of her life has been sent down, too.  And Orion has no recollection of who she is.  This fantasy book was pretty good.  I enjoyed the references to the different gods and goddesses and how they could effect True’s mission.

05. November 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Fiction, Kira, Memoirs · Tags: , ,

Haatchi & Little B: the Inspiring True Story of one Boy and his Dog by Wendy Holden, 224 pages, read by Kira, on 11/01/2014

So I was looking for a the animal’s point of view story preferably a cat story.  What I found on our ebook listing was this dog story and Not from the dog’s point of view.  It is a story about lives who deal with disability and how the dog helps the little boy.  Owen the young boy was born with a rare genetic abnormality called Schwartz-Jampel Syndrome.  This syndrome shortens and tightens all his muscles limiting his mobility in the extreme.

Haatchi the dog, had been tied to train tracks and run over, consequently missing his tail and one of his rear legs.81LTSYB7-zL._SL1500_ haatchi-640x360 owen-haatchi Both need lots of special attention, physical therapy.  Owen had been withdrawing into himself, as he noticed his difference from fellow kids.  Haatchi brought him out of his shell, and 571151-24ab88ee-982c-11e3-ae2a-c06439f32ae2allowed him to blossom.  Haatchi won all sorts of awards it seemed almost improbably, but I guess, the grand prize has to go to someone.

Haatchi’s presence helped the fundraising effort for Owen’s new wheelchair.  It ends with a short glossary of special words used by Owen with Haatchi.

Rude Dude speaks in a language that I think kids will find appealing. He doesn’t talk like an adult or a kid but more of a mix of the two. He has lots of interesting history and facts about foods that kids like eating. He starts with chocolate and moves on to hamburgers and egg rolls and pizza. There are some really interesting facts about how these foods came to be favorites and how they came together. He also intersperses his historical facts with healthy eating facts that will hopefully motivate kids. Entertaining and just enough fun stuff to attract young readers.

03. November 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Eric, Humor, Memoirs, NonFiction · Tags:

A Slip of the Keyboard by Terry Pratchett, 307 pages, read by Eric, on 10/16/2014

Fans of Terry Pratchett’s Discworld novels are no strangers to his unique form of satiric humor. In this collection of Pratchett’s non-fiction writing, we are introduced to Sir Terry’s real world, filled with speeches, articles, and never-ending promotional tours. In particular, the tours provide fodder for the most wry, grumpy, and amusing anecdotes. As Neil Gaiman brilliantly observes in the introduction, Terry Pratchett is not a jolly old elf. He does, however, produce some of the best satirical writing on the planet. He also doesn’t come across as mean spirited. This is a wonderful collection!

30. October 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Children's Books, History, Lisa, NonFiction

He Has Shot the President by Don Brown, 64 pages, read by Lisa, on 10/29/2014

The headline that shocked the nation: President Lincoln Shot by Assassin John Wilkes Booth! One of the most exciting stories in American history told with full color illustrations.
The fifth installment in Don Brown’s Actual Times series featuring significant days in American history covers the Lincoln assassination and the ensuing manhunt. In He Has Shot the President! both Lincoln and Booth emerge as vivid characters, defined by the long and brutal Civil War, and set on a collision course toward tragedy. With his characteristic straightforward storytelling voice and dynamic water color illustration, Don Brown gives readers a chronological account of the events and also captures the emotion of the death of America’s greatest president.

29. October 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Cats, Fiction, Humor, Tracy

Downton Tabby by Chris Kelly , 80 pages, read by Tracy, on 10/16/2014

Welcome to Downton Tabby

Here, the aristocrats of the animal kingdom dwell in stately splendor, sleeping, grooming, sleeping some more, and being fed by their downstairs cats, unaware that their way of life; providing work for others; is about to be swept away by the tides of history . . . and runaway cars.

The fur will fly.

This humorous parody provides essential information for preserving their Golden Age, including How to Keep a Secret at Downton Tabby, How to Argue with Lord Grimalkin About His Most Deeply Held Beliefs, and some Uninvited but Necessary Words from the Dowager.

29. October 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Autobiographies, Memoirs, NonFiction, Tracy

An Open Book: Coming of Age in the Heartland by Michael Dirda, 335 pages, read by Tracy, on 10/09/2014

The acclaimed literary journalist Michael Dirda recreates his boyhood in rust-belt Ohio. The result is an affectionate homage to small-town America, as well as a paean to what could be called the last great age of reading.

28. October 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Biographies, NonFiction, Paula

Natalie Wood: A Life by Lambert, Gavin, 370 pages, read by Paula, on 10/27/2014

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She spent her life in the movies. Her childhood is still there to see in Miracle on 34th Street.Her adolescence in Rebel Without a Cause.Her coming of age? Still playing in Splendor in the Grass and West Side Story and countless other hit movies. From the moment Natalie Wood made her debut in 1946, playing Claudette Colbert and Orson Welles’s ward inTomorrow Is Foreverat the age of seven, to her shocking, untimely death in 1981, the decades of her life are marked by movies that–for their moments–summed up America’s dreams. Now the acclaimed novelist, biographer, critic and screenwriter Gavin Lambert, whose twenty-year friendship with Natalie Wood began when she wanted to star in the movie adaptation of his novel Inside Daisy Clover,tells her extraordinary story. He writes about her parents, uncovering secrets that Natalie either didn’t know or kept hidden from those closest to her. Here is the young Natalie, from her years as a child actress at the mercy of a driven, controlling stage mother (“Make Mr. Pichel love you,” she whispered to the five-year-old Natalie before depositing her unexpectedly on the director’s lap), to her awkward adolescence when, suddenly too old for kiddie roles, she was shunted aside, just another freshman at Van Nuys High. Lambert shows us the glamorous movie star in her twenties—All the Fine Young Cannibals, Gypsy and Love with the Proper Stranger. He writes about her marriages, her divorces, her love affairs, her suicide attempt at twenty-six, the birth of her children, her friendships, her struggles as an actress and her tragic death by drowning (she was always terrified of water) at forty-three. For the first time, everyone who knew Natalie Wood speaks freely–including her husbands Robert Wagner and Richard Gregson, famously private people like Warren Beatty, intimate friends such as playwright Mart Crowley, directors Robert Mulligan and Paul Mazursky, and Leslie Caron, each of whom told the author stories about this remarkable woman who was both life-loving and filled with despair. What we couldn’t know–have never been told before–Lambert perceptively uncovers. His book provides the richest portrait we have had of Natalie Wood.

 

28. October 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Brian, Inspirational, NonFiction

I am a Church Member by Thom S. Rainer, 79 pages, read by Brian, on 10/27/2014

churchThis book is about attitude.  How a new member to a church can help the church grow as well themselves.  In reality I found this book applies to almost every organization.  A good & quick read.

 

 

26. October 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Graphic Book, Humor, Inspirational, Katy, NonFiction

The Terrible and Wonderful Reasons Why I Run Long Distances by Matthew Inman and The Oatmeal, 145 pages, read by Katy, on 10/25/2014

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From the New York Times best-selling author Matthew Inman, aka “The Oatmeal”, comes this collection of comics and stories about running, eating, napping, and one cartoonist’s reasons for running across mountains until his toenails fall off.

25. October 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Autobiographies, Humor, Informational Book, Inspirational, Noelle, NonFiction

Bossypants by Tina Fey, 277 pages, read by Noelle, on 10/04/2014

LOVED THIS BOOK!

Before Liz Lemon, before “Weekend Update,” before “Sarah Palin,” Tina Fey was just a young girl with a dream: a recurring stress dream that she was being chased through a local airport by her middle-school gym teacher. She also had a dream that one day she would be a comedian on TV.

She has seen both these dreams come true.

At last, Tina Fey’s story can be told. From her youthful days as a vicious nerd to her tour of duty on Saturday Night Live; from her passionately halfhearted pursuit of physical beauty to her life as a mother eating things off the floor; from her one-sided college romance to her nearly fatal honeymoon — from the beginning of this paragraph to this final sentence.

Tina Fey reveals all, and proves what we’ve all suspected: you’re no one until someone calls you bossy.

23. October 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Humor, NonFiction, Tammy · Tags: , ,

I Work at a Public Library: A Collection of Crazy Stories from the Stacks by Gina Sheridan , 157 pages, read by Tammy, on 10/12/2014

i work at a public libraryStrange but true stories from a librarian who worked in public libraries in Missouri and California. Contrary to what many of our patrons believe libraries are not always quiet, calm places where nothing unusual happens. As a mentoring staff member said to me when I first started, remember this is a public library that means we will see all of the public, people from every walk of life and in every kind of situation.

No two days are exactly the same at a public library. There are the  sweet moments, sad moments, the times when you’ve just made someone’s day simply by having the book or movie they were looking for, or telling a patron they have a late fee is the last straw on an already bad day. But sometimes you get those moments where you might have just made a major difference in someone’s life today.

A  lot of the stories in the book are the more amusing and unusual happenings that Gina Sheridan encountered at the libraries where she has worked but some are touching too.

23. October 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Adult Books, NonFiction, Tammy · Tags: , ,

What the Dog Saw and Other Adventures by Malcolm Gladwell, 410 pages, read by Tammy, on 10/15/2014

what the dog sawGladwell’s fourth book brings together the best of his writing from the New Yorker in the past decade. He discusses not just interesting and unique people but tries to discover what they are thinking that led them to these theories or to be the unique individual they are.

Here you’ll find the bittersweet tale of the inventor of the birth control pill, and the dazzling creations of pasta sauce pioneer Howard Moscowitz. Gladwell sits with Ron Popeil, the king of the American kitchen, as he sells rotisserie ovens, and divines the secrets of Cesar Millan, the “dog whisperer” who can calm savage animals with the touch of his hand. He explores intelligence tests and ethnic profiling and why it was that employers in Silicon Valley once tripped over themselves to hire the same college graduate.

Even though I picked up this book because I was expecting a story collection with animals I found these essays thought-provoking and challenging yet enjoyable. This is how this book is similar to his previous three titles, Blink, The Outliers and the Tipping Point.

23. October 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Adult Books, Cats, Fiction, Humor, Tammy · Tags:

Diary of a Cat: True Confessions and Lifelong Observations of a Well-Adjusted House Cat by Leigh W. Rutledge , 176 pages, read by Tammy, on 10/12/2014

diary of a catWritten as the daily diary of an unnamed house cat, Diary of a Cat shows you the world through a feline perspective. Cat shares what he sees in his own neighborhood and not just the birds but what his human neighbors are up to as well. You will discover what Cat is thinking while he stays at a single speck on the wall, how it feels about a new kitten moving into his house and why sleeping is such a vital all-day activity and much more.
A funny, sweet read.

jennifer's wayThe National Foundation for Celiac Awareness estimates that as many as one in 133 Americans has celiac disease. This includes my 7-year-old niece who was recently diagnosed after almost a year of unexplained severe stomach pains. People with celiac disease are unable to process gluten which is found in wheat, rye and barley and many everyday items you wouldn’t think of such as some brands of toothpastes. The gluten triggers there body to mount an immune response that attacks the small intestine causing pain and preventing the body from receiving nutrients and being able to process some other foods often dairy.

Unfortunately, 83 percent of people who have this disease are undiagnosed or misdiagnosed—suffering through years of pain and misunderstanding.Actress Jennifer Esposito received an accurate diagnosis only after decades of mysterious illnesses and myriad misdiagnoses.

Now Jennifer shares her personal journey—from her childhood in Brooklyn to her years as a young actress, all the while suffering from unexplained ailments. Jennifer’s struggle to finally receive an accurate diagnosis is one that anyone who has a chronic disease will share.

Not only will you learn Jennifer’s personal story through her diagnosis to healing, but you’ll find recipes she uses at home, along with recipes for some of the delicious treats she offers at her own gluten-free bakery, Jennifer’s Way, in New York.

For anyone with a chronic illness or friend or family member with a chronic illness this is an encouraging and uplifting read about getting through the daily struggles.

23. October 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Cats, Fiction, Humor, Kira · Tags:

Grumpy cat : a grumpy book / by Grumpy Cat. by Grumpy Cat: a Grumpy Book., 96 pages, read by Kira, on 10/21/2014

gcbook-225x300 Here we learn where Grumpy Cat lives (in Arizona), what his first words were “No”, “Good”, and how he likes the desert.  Full of the humor you’ve come to know and love, Grumpy Cat spreads his warm fuzzies around.

23. October 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Autobiographies, Brian, NonFiction · Tags:

Bill Self: At Home In the Phog by Bill Self, 240 pages, read by Brian, on 10/22/2014

billUniversity of Kansas coach, Bill Self is one of the greatest college basketball coaches of all times.  His book details his early playing days, an assistant to Larry Brown and coaching days at four universities.  He talks about all the memorable moments as a coach.  Highly recommended.

 

download (1)Let the hilarity ensue!  This humorous look at one person’s life is as funny as it is interesting.  I am not a dog owner, but I could still relate to the chapters about life with her dogs simply from knowing other people who live with dogs.  The chapters on depression, while also funny, are very poignant and hit close to home for anyone who suffers from or knows someone who suffers from depression.  I would recommend this book just for those chapters alone.  At times, I felt like the author had stepped out of her life and into my own when she was describing the “flawed coping mechanisms” part of the book.  It will definitely make readers giggle even if they don’t see themselves in the events the author is describing.  I couldn’t get enough of this one.  Hope she publishes a second!

22. October 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Informational Book, Marsha, NonFiction

What We See When We Read by Peter Mendelsund, 419 pages, read by Marsha, on 10/13/2014

downloadThis delightful book makes the reader examine more closely what we visualize as we read.  When reading a character description, this book suggests that we don’t see an image as fully as our imagination allows us to think we do.  Mendelsund uses several examples of character descriptions from literature to demonstrate this.  The author also tells us that some of what we visualize is as much from behaviors or nonphysical characteristics of the characters as it is from descriptions of physical traits.  I found this book to be an absorbing read, difficult to put down.  The graphics and illustrations included in the book fit the text nicely.  Readers will never see their characters the same way again!