31. March 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Children's Books, Fairy Tales and Folklore, Fantasy, Tammy · Tags:

Instructions by Neil Gamain, read by Tammy, on 03/29/2014

instructionsAn instruction book for any adventure you might want or need to take into fairyland or fantasy. Aimed at children and very brief with beautiful illustrations. I enjoyed the story though and think that adults will recognize fairy tales where the main characters didn’t follow the rules and bad things happened.

30. March 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Autobiographies, History, Inspirational, Memoirs, NonFiction, Rachel

The Hiding Place by Corrie ten Boom, read by Rachel, on 03/29/2014

This was a fantastic autobiography! Reminiscent of Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank, The Hiding Place provided the perspective of a Christian family in Holland hiding those who were fleeing Nazi persecution. I was amazed by the organization of the resistance and the positivity of Corrie ten Boom during one of the darkest times of history.

This is the true story of how Corrie ten Boom and her family became leaders in the Dutch underground when the Nazis invaded Holland, hiding Jewish people in their home in a specially built room.

24. March 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Adult Books, Fiction, Humor, Pamela, Romance · Tags:

Stop the Wedding! by Stephanie Bond, read by Pamela, on 03/23/2014

weddingDivorce attorney, Annabelle Coakley is quite upset that her mother is planning to remarry.  And, marrying washed up film star, Martin Castleberry, to boot.  She heads to Atlanta with one goal in mind – stop the wedding!

Clay Castleberry, the groom’s son, leaves unfinished business in Paris to hopefully buy off the new lady in his father’s life.

Even though Annabelle and Clay don’t get off on the right foot, they decide to join forces and work together to stop their parent’s wedding.  They soon discover they have feelings for one another, although neither will admit it.

This was a cute little romance; sort of predictable; and available only on book on CD in our library.  Enjoy!

17. March 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Humor, Kira, NonFiction

Dave Barry's Greatest Hits by Dave Barry, read by Kira, on 03/14/2014

Dave BarryMore Humor by Dave Barry.  You have to get into the storytelling mode, for Barry’s humor to work, and then it catches you!
I very much enjoyed this book!

 

 

17. March 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Fiction, Sarah, Science Fiction, Teen Books

Allegiant by Veronica Roth, read by Sarah, on 03/04/2014

Ok, so I read Divergent and Insurgent…wonderful…then I read Allegiant.  First, the idea behind it was great.  It starts off right where Insurgent left off and leads into Tris and Four joining a group to find out what is on the other side of the fence surrounding their city.  They discover they are part of an experimental group with genetic implications.  New allies and enemies are made in the compound where they are staying.  I have mixed feelings on this one.  The other two were told from the exclusive point of view of Tris while this one bounced back and forth between Tris and Four.  Sometimes, the continuity was not there to keep up with the story.  Although it was helpful to hear Four’s view, I enjoyed Tris’s storyline better.  Their relationship was tested, and they alternate between loving and fighting.  Overall, it did not live up to my expectations, but it was still pretty good.

14. March 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: How To's, Informational Book, NonFiction, Tammy · Tags: ,

Compact Houses by Gerald Rowan, read by Tammy, on 03/08/2014

compact homesGuide to making the most of smaller homes though several of these I didn’t consider small. The book gives floor plans, guides to what to consider when designing room layouts, ways to remodel small spaces to make them more energy efficient and a few general ideas to make the most of every inch in your smaller home.

I was hoping for more ideas on remodeling an existing small home.

 

05. March 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Courtney, Graphic Book, Informational Book, NonFiction

Hip Hop Family Tree, Vol. 1 by Ed Piskor, read by Courtney, on 03/03/2014

Ed Piskor has taken on an extremely ambitious undertaking in his on-going Hip Hop Family Tree comic strip. Originally serialized online at Boing Boing, the comic has now been collected and bound for our reading pleasure. Beginning with some of the earliest house parties and rap battles and moving up through rap’s mainstream breakthrough in Blondie’s single, “Rapture”, this first volume has a lot of ground to cover. The end of the book features an index and discographies, both of the artists and the beats/breaks frequently used by DJs.
I totally get why the format is used for this history of hip hop, but I still can’t help but feel like there’s something missing here. It gets difficult to keep track of all the names and alliances. There are definitely tons of noteworthy moments featured throughout, but more organization and contextual information would have been helpful.

03. March 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Informational Book, Madeline, NonFiction, Travel

My Venice and Other Essays by Donna Leon, read by Madeline, on 02/28/2014

Donna Leon has won a huge number of passionate fans and a tremendous amount of critical acclaim for her international bestselling mystery series featuring Venetian Commissario Guido Brunetti. These accolades have built up not just for her intricate plots and gripping narratives, but for her insight into the culture, politics, family-life, and history of Venice, one of the world’s most-treasured cities, and Leon’s home for over thirty years. Readers love how Leon opens the doors to a private Venice, beyond the reach of the millions of international tourists who delight in the city’s canals, food, and art every year.

My Venice and Other Essays will be a treat for Leon’s many fans, as well as for lovers of Italy and La Serenissima. For many years, Leon, who is a perennial #1 bestseller in Germany, has written essays for European publications. Collected here are the best of these: over fifty funny, charming, passionate, and insightful essays that range from battles over garbage in the canals to the troubles with rehabbing Venetian real estate. She shares episodes from her life in Venice, explores her love of opera, and recounts tales from in and around her country house in the mountains. With pointed observations and humor, she also explores her family history and former life in New Jersey, and the idea of the Italian man.

TV writer Hilary Winston offers up a witty collection of autobiographical tales about her misadventures in dating.

Just when Hilary feels like her life is finally in order, she gets a sucker-punch to the gut: Her ex has written a novel based on their relationship in which he refers to her throughout as the “fat-assed girlfriend.” Her response to this affront is just one of the many hilarious stories in My Boyfriend Wrote a Book About Me–a laugh-out-loud, tell-all in which Hilary sets the record straight on all her exes.

03. March 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Autobiographies, Madeline, NonFiction

An American Bride in Kabul: A Memoir by Phyllis Chesler, read by Madeline, on 02/02/2014

Few westerners will ever be able to understand Muslim or Afghan society unless they are part of a Muslim family. Twenty years old and in love, Phyllis Chesler, a Jewish-American girl from Brooklyn, embarked on an adventure that has lasted for more than a half-century. In 1961, when she arrived in Kabul with her Afghan bridegroom, authorities took away her American passport. Chesler was now the property of her husband’s family and had no rights of citizenship. Back in Afghanistan, her husband, a wealthy, westernized foreign college student with dreams of reforming his country, reverted to traditional and tribal customs. Chesler found herself unexpectedly trapped in a posh polygamous family, with no chance of escape. She fought against her seclusion and lack of freedom, her Afghan family’s attempts to convert her from Judaism to Islam, and her husband’s wish to permanently tie her to the country through childbirth. Drawing upon her personal diaries, Chesler recounts her ordeal, the nature of gender apartheid–and her longing to explore this beautiful, ancient, and exotic country and culture. Chesler nearly died there but she managed to get out, returned to her studies in America, and became an author and an ardent activist for women’s rights throughout the world. “An American Bride in Kabul “is the story of how a naive American girl learned to see the world through eastern as well as western eyes and came to appreciate Enlightenment values. This dramatic tale re-creates a time gone by, a place that is no more, and shares the way in which Chesler turned adversity into a passion for world-wide social, educational, and political reform.

late bloomer  Clarissa Pinkola Estes examines archetypal themes in fairy tales relevant to unleashing creativity and letting your unique talents blossom. Estes uses a combination of Jungian psychology together with family wisdom to explain the significance of various tales.  I learned that she had been held at gunpoint down in Guatemala, during a period of civil unrest, listening to her inner voice/angel, she eventually started singing to her kidnappers, who let her go, saying the singing was driving them nuts. She finishes each chapter with a blessing.  I really liked this title, As it was so deep & rich, I wouldn’t want to read several back to back.  I really clientImg_estesenjoyed this book, & feel cactslike I benefited from her wisdom.

28. February 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Adult Books, Courtney, Graphic Novel, Humor

How Are You Feeling? by David Shrigley, read by Courtney, on 02/15/2014

With advice like this….
“How to Become a Better Conversationalist:
Smile
Listen
Avoid talking about anything
interesting or worthwhile.
Helpful Acronym: FURRY
Feel
Uplifted
Really
Really
Yes
Other helpful acronyms:
GLUE
BEANS
FLACID [sic]
CLOGS
…how can you go wrong?
Seriously though, I laughed out loud throughout.

27. February 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: History, NonFiction, Tammy · Tags:

1776 by David McCullough, read by Tammy, on 02/07/2014

1776One of America’s most popular history writers gives us another beautifully written and exciting to read history. Reading more like a novel, 1776, pulls us into the year of our nation’s birth. He tells the story from both sides of the Atlantic and covers decisions on both sides that led to the American Revolution. Once war begins, McCullough relates the story of those who marched with George Washington, the farmers, schoolteachers, shoemakers and boys trying to be soldiers. As well as relating stories of some of the King’s men, under British commander, William Howe.

Based on extensive research in both American and British archives, 1776 is a powerful narrative and winner of the Pulitzer Prize.

27. February 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Contemporary Fiction, Fiction, Tammy, Teen Books

Reconstructing Amelia by Kimberly McCreight, read by Tammy, on 02/04/2014

ameliaA coming of age story, a mystery, a mother-daughter relationship story are all wound tightly together in this novel. After Amelia’s suicide her mother, Kate searches to find who her daughter really was and if she really committed suicide. Told from both Kate and Amelia’s perspectives and through text, email and Facebook posts the story shows how today’s teens smoothly communicate on all the numerous social media that exists today and how easy it is for a parent to fall behind. Kate has to come to terms with who Amelia really was and all the events that led up to her death. A moving, relate-able story that keeps you turning the page.

26. February 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Adult Books, Fairy Tales and Folklore, Fiction, Graphic Book, Kira

Fairest: In all the Land by Bill Willingham, read by Kira, on 02/24/2014

Someone is killing all the pretty heroines.  Cindy (Cinderella) takes up the investigation trying to figure out who and why, and can she save her sisters.  An odd story within a story, except at the end, you realize you should have paid attention to the main narrator.    9781401239008_p0_v2_s260x420STK619326120306035527-fairest-1-cover-story-top index

26. February 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Inspirational, NonFiction, Pamela

The Four Doors by Richard Paul Evans, read by Pamela, on 02/24/2014

4 doorsThe Four Doors is Evans’s message to those who seek inspiration in their lives. It began as a talk he gave on the spur of the moment, and over the course of ten years, it has evolved into a message he has shared with successful business people, students, and even addicts and prisoners. It includes stories his readers have told him, stories about great achievers who overcame hardships, and stories about his own struggle growing up in a large family with financial difficulties and a suicidal mother, and about his diagnosis of Tourette’s Syndrome later in life. These inspiring stories are woven through his identification and careful explanation of the four doors to a more fulfilling life:

BELIEVE THERE’ S A REASON YOU WERE BORN

FREE YOURSELF FROM LIMITATION

MAGNIF Y YOUR LIFE

DEVELOP A LOVE-CENTERED MAP

Evans believes that we all want to know the meaning of our lives. In The Four Doors, he shows how even the most quiet life can be full of purpose and joy, if we choose to take that first step over the threshold.

If you’re a Richard Paul Evans fan, I think you’ll like this book. It’s a quick read, short and concise.

25. February 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Children's Books, NonFiction, Pamela · Tags: ,

Raisel's Riddle by Erica Silverman, read by Pamela, on 02/22/2014

riddleThis is lovely Jewish version of the Cinderella story.  Raisel was raised by her grandfather, a poor scholar who studied day and night.  When Raisel’s grandfather dies she travels to the nearby city and comes to live in a rabbi’s home.  She is belittled by the cook (wicked stepmother) and made to work harder than she ever has in her life.  An old beggar woman (fairy godmother) visits her and gives her three wishes.  The one caveat is the wishes do not last past midnight.  Raisel attends the Purim ball where no one recognizes her.  She poses a riddle (lost slipper) to the rabbi’s son, then quickly leaves as it is getting close to midnight.  The rabbi’s son eventually finds the woman who shared the riddle and they live happily ever after.

15. February 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Biographies, Courtney, NonFiction, Teen Books

My Friend Dahmer by Derf Backderf, read by Courtney, on 07/19/2013

When it comes to serial killers, few are as well-known as Jeffrey Dahmer. To the author, “Jeff”, was much more than a face on the news. Backderf grew up in the same town and went to the same school as Dahmer. Long before the name “Dahmer” entered public consciousness, he was an awkward and troubled kid. Through the eyes of a friendly acquaintance (Backderf never genuinely appears to consider Dahmer a true “friend”, but more of kid on the periphery of his social circle), we meet a boy who was certainly unusual and somewhat anti-social. Readers will follow Dahmer from childhood to his teen years and, while it paints a slightly more sympathetic version of Dahmer, it never explains or excuses the actions he eventually takes. In hindsight, the signs were there, but it was clear that, at the time, Dahmer was simply regarded as the resident odd-ball and few thought little else about him.
What makes this graphic novel particularly interesting is the inclusion of both photos and documents from Backderf and Dahmer’s school years, as well as the detailed, page-by-page annotations provided by Backderf. This graphic novel is morbidly fascinating. Readers with any interest whatsoever on the topic will find themselves sucked in with no chance of escape until the end of the book. I was intrigued, horrified and even occasionally amused by Backderf’s story.

11. February 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Biographies, Helen, Memoirs, NonFiction

Most Talkative by Andy Cohen, read by Helen, on 09/30/2012

The man behind the Real Housewives writes about his lifelong love affair with pop culture that brought him from the suburbs of St. Louis to his own television show

From a young age, Andy Cohen knew one thing: He loved television. Not in the way that most kids do, but in an irrepressible, all-consuming, I-want-to-climb-inside-the-tube kind of way. And climb inside he did. Now presiding over Bravo’s reality TV empire, he started out as an overly talkative pop culture obsessive, devoted to Charlie’s Angels and All My Children and to his mother, who received daily letters from Andy at summer camp, usually reminding her to tape the soaps. In retrospect, it’s hard to believe that everyone didn’t know that Andy was gay; still, he remained in the closet until college. Finally out, he embarked on making a career out of his passion for television.

The journey begins with Andy interviewing his all-time idol Susan Lucci for his college newspaper and ends with him in a job where he has a hand in creating today’s celebrity icons. In the witty, no-holds-barred style of his show Watch What Happens Live, Andy tells tales of absurd mishaps during his ten years at CBS News, hilarious encounters with the heroes and heroines of his youth, and the real stories behind The Real Housewives. Dishy, funny, and full of heart, Most Talkative provides a one-of-a-kind glimpse into the world of television, from a fan who grew up watching the screen and is now inside it, both making shows and hosting his own.

11. February 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Helen, Informational Book, NonFiction

Doing Social Media so it Matters by Laura Solomon, read by Helen, on 09/30/2012

Facebook, Twitter, MySpace, LinkedIn: it’s difficult enough to keep abreast of social media Web sites, let alone understand how they fit into today’s library. This practical resource brings together current information on the topic in a concise format that’s easy to digest. Laura Solomon is a librarian with more than a decade of experience in Web development, design, and technology, and her timely guide Provides context on the social media phenomenonOffers practical advice on how libraries can choose, use, and monitor these tools effectivelyIdentifies additional resources and best practicesSolomon has written a unique, to-the-point guidebook for those ready to jump into the deep end of the pool and commence or improve their library’s tweeting, posting, and friending.