29. August 2013 · Comments Off · Categories: History, Informational Book, Janet, NonFiction

Haunted Ozarks by Janice Tremeear, read by Janet, on 08/28/2013

Haunted Ozarks     We live in an area of the Ozarks that has a very interesting history.  Some people who lived here before are not content to be forgotten.  The lay of the land is so varied that many types of living arrangements have developed through the years. From the earliest man living here, about 10,000 BC, to the present, many groups of people have had experiences that have left a busy history in this region – the Mound Builders, the Baldknobbers, and the Jessie James gang, to name a few.  There have also been happenings that involved many people, such as the Civil War and the Trail of Tears.  It seems that when some people die untimely, their spirit remains in that area.  Many stories are Indian legends.    Every county has at least one place where the restless bodies are known to be seen or heard, things are moved, or one feels the presence of another body.  Many homes are named in this story: Ha Ha Tonka, Leeper Mansion near Chillicothe, Houston House at Newburg, the Iberia Academy, the Kendrick House at Carthage, and Ozark Avalon were a few.  There are also many castle-like homes which have haunted legends.  Along with the stories are old sayings and superstitions listed.  This is a very interesting book with lots of historic information.

01. August 2013 · Comments Off · Categories: Informational Book, Madeline, NonFiction

Steal the Menu: A Memoir of Forty Years in Food by Raymond Sokolov, read by Madeline, on 07/31/2013

Four decades of memories from a gastronome who witnessed the food revolution from the (well-provisioned) trenches–a delicious tour through contemporary food history. When Raymond Sokolov became food editor of The New York Times in 1971, he began a long, memorable career as restaurant critic, food historian, and author. Here he traces the food scene he reported on in America and abroad, from his pathbreaking dispatches on nouvelle cuisine chefs like Paul Bocuse and Michel Guérard in France to the rise of contemporary American food stars like Thomas Keller and Grant Achatz, and the fruitful collision of science and cooking in the kitchens of El Bulli in Spain, the Fat Duck outside London, and Copenhagen’s gnarly Noma. Sokolov invites readers to join him as a privileged observer of the most transformative period in the history of cuisine with this personal narrative of the sensual education of an accidental gourmet. We dine out with him at temples of haute cuisine like New York’s Lutèce but also at a pioneering outpost of Sichuan food in a gas station in New Jersey, at a raunchy Texas chili cookoff, and at a backwoods barbecue shack in Alabama, as well as at three-star restaurants from Paris to Las Vegas. Steal the Menu is, above all, an entertaining and engaging account of a tumultuous period of globalizing food ideas and frontier-crossing ingredients that produced the unprecedentedly rich and diverse way of eating we enjoy today.

01. August 2013 · Comments Off · Categories: Informational Book, Madeline, NonFiction

Gun Guys: A Road Trip by Dan Baum, read by Madeline, on 07/05/2013

Here is armed America, land of machine-gun gatherings in the desert, lederhosened German shooting societies, feral-hog hunts in Texas, and Hollywood gun armories. Whether they are collecting antique weapons, practicing concealed carry, or firing an AR-15 or a Glock at their local range, many Americans love guns, which horrifies and fascinates many other Americans, and much of the rest of the world. This book explores from the inside the American love affair with firearms. The author is both a lifelong gun guy and a Jewish Democrat who grew up in suburban New Jersey feeling like a “child of a bitter divorce with allegiance to both parents.” In this book he grabs his licensed concealed handgun and hits the road to meet some of the 40 percent of Americans who own guns. We meet Rick Ector, a black Detroit autoworker who buys a Smith & Wesson after suffering an armed robbery, then quits his job to preach the gospel of armed self-defense, especially to the resistant black community; Jeremy and Marcey Parker, a young, successful Kentucky couple whose idea of a romantic getaway is the Blue Ridge Mountain 3-Gun Championship in Bowling Green; and Aaron Zelman, head of Jews for the Preservation of Firearms Ownership. The author also travels to New Orleans, where he enters the world of a man disabled by a bullet, and to Chicago to interview a killer. Along the way, he takes us to gun shows, gun stores, and shooting ranges trying to figure out why so many of us love these things and why they inspire such passions. In the tradition of the books Confederates in the Attic and Among the Thugs, he brings an entire world to life. Written equally for avid shooters and those who would never touch a firearm, this book is more than a travelogue. It gives a fresh assessment of the heated politics surrounding guns, one that will challenge and inform people on all sides of the issue. This book goes beyond gun politics to illuminate the visceral appeal of guns; it is a journey through American gun culture, in search of Americans who love their guns.

30. July 2013 · Comments Off · Categories: Children's Books, Informational Book, Lisa, NonFiction

Wolves and Other Wild Dogs by Mary E. Reid, read by Lisa, on 07/29/2013

Questions and answers explore the world of wild dogs, with an emphasis on wolves.

30. July 2013 · Comments Off · Categories: Informational Book, Lisa, NonFiction

From diapers to dating : a parent's guide to raising sexually healthy children by Debra W. Haffner, read by Lisa, on 07/26/2013

A leading educator offers a practical, step-by-step program to help parents provide accurate information about sexuality and communicate their own values to their children.

30. July 2013 · Comments Off · Categories: Informational Book, Lisa, NonFiction

Peaceful parent, happy kids : how to stop yelling and start connecting by Laura Markham, read by Lisa, on 07/23/2013

A groundbreaking guide to raising responsible, capable, happy kids.Based on the latest research on brain development and clinical experience with parents, Dr. Laura Markham’s approach is as simple as it is effective. Her message: Fostering emotional connection with your child creates real and lasting change. When you have that vital connection, you don’t need to threaten, nag, plead, bribe—or even punish.This remarkable guide will help parents better understand their own emotions—and get them in check—so they can parent with healthy limits, empathy, and clear communication to raise a self-disciplined child. Step-by-step examples give solutions and kid-tested phrasing for parents of toddlers right through the elementary years.If you’re tired of power struggles, tantrums, and searching for the right ‘consequence,’ look no further. You’re about to discover the practical tools you need to transform your parenting in a positive, proven way.’Dr. Laura shows parents how their empathy can wire their child’s brain for emotional regulation and happiness-and a brighter future for humanity. A simple yet revolutionary message of love.’ Nancy Samalin, MS, bestselling author of four books including Loving Without Spoiling’If you want to feel more confindent and peaceful as a parent, this is the book. Dr Laura helps you understand what drives your child’s behavior, and gives you the practical tools to change it.’ Elizabeth Pantley, bestselling author of twelve books including The No Cry Sleep Solution

worldle breene

Brene Brown’s latest work debunks the myth that showing vulnerability is weakness, rather it takes courage to be vulnerable.  At the end she provides guideposts to living wholeheartedly.

Brene Brown has a couple of fabulous talks on TED.  I recomend starting with this one http://www.ted.com/talks/brene_brown_on_vulnerability.html  its been viewed over 10 million times!  I think she is profound.

Some of her quotes:

Want to be happy? Stop trying to be perfect.

You either walk inside your story and own it, or you stand outside, your story & hustle for your worthiness.

power of vulnerability

brenee

Then there’s a Teddy Roosevelt quote that she likes.

It is not the critic who counts; not the one who points out how the strong person stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the one who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, and comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if zhe fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that their place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat.

vulnerab  Brene

Teaching children ethics, values, and morals has become a real challenge for parents today. These topics aren’t usually covered in school curriculums, and many families no longer attend religious services, so most modern moms and dads are clamoring for a helping hand.

Ian James Corlett, an award-winning children’s TV writer, was inspired to write this book as his own family grappled with this issue. When Ian’s two kids were very young, he and his wife started a weekly discussion period he dubbed “Family Fun Time.” Every Monday after dinner, they all sat down and Ian would tell his two kids tales about two young children, Elliott and Lucy, who were much like them.

- They hated going to the dentist.

- They were disappointed when a favorite aunt couldn’t visit.

- They dreaded raking the leaves in their backyard.

Ian’s kids really looked forward to these talks and they hardly even realized that the stories were serving a deeper purpose — to teach tact, understanding, and responsibility. So he decided to write these stories down to help other parents — like you. The result is in your hands: twenty-six simple, clear, original, and entertaining stories for you to read aloud with your child.

Teaching your children values, life skills, and ethics has never been so much fun!

24. June 2013 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Children's Books, Informational Book, NonFiction

The Great Katie Kate Tackles Questions about Cancer by M. Maitland DeLand, read by Angie, on 06/23/2013

In this book a young girl learns she may have cancer and she has a lot of questions. So the Great Katie Kate answers all her questions and shows her that she doesn’t need to worry. I really liked the idea of a Worry Wombat so she had something to focus on. The explanations of what you go through with cancer treatments were also spot on and appropriate for very young children; didn’t go into a lot of detail, but just enough to alleviate fears. My only concern with this book was the doctor telling the little girl she might have cancer before even running tests. It set up the book, but I think it might have been better for the girl to have been diagnosed first so she wouldn’t worry needlessly.

I received a copy of this book from the publishers on Netgalley.com.

18. June 2013 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, History, Informational Book, NonFiction

Bonk: The Curious Coupling of Science and Sex by Mary Roach, read by Angie, on 06/16/2013

Did you know that congestion is basically an erection in your nose? I didn’t, but it is making me think of colds in a whole new way. Mary Roach tackles sex in all its glory in Bonk. Like Stiff and Packing for Mars (the other two Roach books I have read so far), she focuses on the absurd, the lurid, and the hilarity of the subject. She delves into the history of sex research from Kinsey to Masters and Johnson to modern day researchers. Through Roach’s research we also learn all about penile implants, non-sexual orgasms, who has the best sex* and more. The book was fun to listen to if slightly embarrassing when caught at a light while driving. Other drivers tend to take notice when the words masturbation and clitoris are blaring out of your speakers. This is my third Mary Roach book and I highly recommend them.

*In case you are wondering…it is gay and lesbian couples who have the best sex. They seem to take their time and enjoy the ride whereas heterosexual couples race to the finish line and don’t always take the time for their partners.

indexCA6OFCENIn this book, Timothy Caulfield takes on the ginormous task of sifting through all of the health information out there in order to present his audience with genuine, unbiased facts on how to improve health. He debunks common weight loss misconceptions like “exercising helps you lose weight.” According to his research, exercise stimulates appetite, causing people to eat as much or more calories than they burn exercising. Exercising alone rarely results in weight loss. He also bashes workout methods such as yoga and Pilates, saying that they provide little in the way of exercise. In order for your workout to be beneficial, it needs to involve intense interval training. As for diet, he states what many have stated before him: dieters must eat smaller portion sizes and avoid poison-foods (junk food). While I liked the humor sprinkled throughout this book, I didn’t find it particularly revolutionary. But perhaps that’s because I’m a bit of a health-freak and I try to stay on top of health-related information. To someone relatively unacquainted with the health world, this book could be pretty informative.

31. May 2013 · Comments Off · Categories: Children's Books, Informational Book, Lisa, NonFiction

Wombats by Barbara Triggs., read by Lisa, on 05/14/2013

Presents, in text and photographs, the habits, life cycle, and natural environment of the Australian wombat, one of the world’s largest burrowing animals.

21. May 2013 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, History, Humor, Informational Book, NonFiction

Packing for Mars: The Curious Science of Life in the Void by Mary Roach, read by Angie, on 05/21/2013

I was first introduced to Mary Roach with Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadaversand I quickly fell in love. Roach has the ability to make nonfiction fun and informative. In Packing for Mars: The Curious Science of Life in the Void, Roach tackles life in space. This book is chock full of everything you ever wanted to know about the history of space exploration and a bunch of stuff you never thought about and will never forget. Roach spends a big portion of the book dealing with human digestion and how to deal with it in space. Our bodies don’t work quiet the same in zero gravity as they do on Earth. So eating and everything that comes after have to be dealt with in special ways. Roach details everything from different sized condom-type urine collection bags, to fecal popcorning, to space toilets, to recycling waste into food (highly unpalatable). There are also the problems of how to eat in space and how your clothes break down after going unwashed for weeks. I was not aware that underwear would disintegrate after a couple weeks of constant wear/definitely not something I have had to experience! Roach doesn’t just focus on the absurd and the gross, she is truly fascinated by space travel and has a deep appreciation for those who work in the industry.

11. May 2013 · Comments Off · Categories: Informational Book, Kristy, NonFiction, Self Help

The Normal Bar by Chrisanna Northrup, read by Kristy, on 05/14/2013

The Normal Bar is an insightful book that gives readers the chance to peek into the relationships of thousands of couples in America and across the globe. the normal barCombining statistics and participant comments, this book presents the reader with what is “normal” in relationships today. Highly recommended.

30. April 2013 · Comments Off · Categories: Courtney, Graphic Book, Informational Book

Economix: How and Why the Economy Works (and Doesn't Work) in Words and Pictures by Michael Goodwin, read by Courtney, on 04/20/2013

With the financial world in more turmoil than it’s ever been, this graphic novel economics primer seems especially timely. Michael Goodwin is out to show readers that the economy can be understood, even by non-economists. He goes back in time to show how our current economic structure evolved and the theories it was built upon. While there’s a lot to take in, Goodwin does an excellent job of simplifying the seemingly obtuse mechanisms that make our economy work (or not). We can easily see where our theoretical foundations lie and where they have deviated from what was originally envisioned. We can also see just how inextricably linked money is with our history and future. It’s simultaneously educational and chilling, but ultimately, knowledge is power (though honestly, money is still likely more powerful) and this knowledge is not nearly as inaccessible as the powers that be would have us believe.
Goodwin makes attempts to keep politics out of the picture, but admits that, when it comes to our current economic climate, it is nearly impossible to be apolitical. Fiscal conservatives will likely feel that Goodwin is being too liberal with in his estimation of the these power structures, but I personally felt that this was an excellent introduction to a very hotly debated topic.

29. April 2013 · Comments Off · Categories: Informational Book, Madeline, NonFiction

Pandora's Lunchbox: How Processed Food Took Over the American Meal by Melanie Warner, read by Madeline, on 04/14/2013

From breakfast cereal to frozen pizza to nutrition bars, processed foods are a fundamental part of our diet, accounting for 65% of our nation’s yearly calories. Over the past century, technology has transformed the American meal into a chemical-laden smorgasbord of manipulated food products that bear little resemblence to what our grandparents ate. Despite the growing presence of farmers’ markets and organic offerings, food additives and chemical preservatives are nearly impossible to avoid, and even the most ostensibly healthy foods contain multisyllabic ingredients with nearly untraceable origins. The far-reaching implications of the industrialization of the food supply that privleges cheap, plentiful, and fast food have been well documented. They are dire. But how did we ever reach the point where ‘pink slime’ is an acceptable food product? Is anybody regulating what makes it into our food? What, after all, is actually safe to eat? Former York Times health columnist Melanie Warner combines deep investigatory reporting, culinary history, and cultural analysis, to find out how we got here and what it is we’re really eating. Vividly written and meticulously researched, Pandora’s Lunchbox blows the lid off the largely undocumented world of processed foods and food manipulation. From the vitamin “enrichments” to our fortified cereals and bread, to the soy mixtures that bolster chicken (and often outweigh the actual chicken included), Warner lays bare the dubious nutritional value and misleading labels of chemically-treated foods, as well as the potential price we–and our children–may pay.

29. April 2013 · Comments Off · Categories: Informational Book, Madeline, NonFiction

Behind the Kitchen Door by Saru Jayaraman, read by Madeline, on 04/11/2013

How do restaurant workers live on some of the lowest wages in America? And how do poor working conditions-discriminatory labor practices, exploitation, and unsanitary kitchens-affect the meals that arrive at our restaurant tables? Saru Jayaraman, who launched the national restaurant workers’ organization Restaurant Opportunities Centers United, sets out to answer these questions by following the lives of restaurant workers in New York City, Washington, D.C., Philadelphia, Los Angeles, Chicago, Houston, Miami, Detroit, and New Orleans.

Blending personal narrative and investigative journalism, Jayaraman shows us that the quality of the food that arrives at our restaurant tables depends not only on the sourcing of the ingredients. Our meals benefit from the attention and skill of the people who chop, grill, sauté, and serve. Behind the Kitchen Door is a groundbreaking exploration of the political, economic, and moral implications of dining out. Jayaraman focuses on the stories of individuals, like Daniel, who grew up on a farm in Ecuador and sought to improve the conditions for employees at Del Posto; the treatment of workers behind the scenes belied the high-toned Slow Food ethic on display in the front of the house.

Increasingly, Americans are choosing to dine at restaurants that offer organic, fair-trade, and free-range ingredients for reasons of both health and ethics. Yet few of these diners are aware of the working conditions at the restaurants themselves. But whether you eat haute cuisine or fast food, the well-being of restaurant workers is a pressing concern, affecting our health and safety, local economies, and the life of our communities. Highlighting the roles of the 10 million people, many immigrants, many people of color, who bring their passion, tenacity, and vision to the American dining experience, Jayaraman sets out a bold agenda to raise the living standards of the nation’s second-largest private sector workforce-and ensure that dining out is a positive experience on both sides of the kitchen door.

02. April 2013 · Comments Off · Categories: Informational Book, Madeline, NonFiction · Tags:

The Truth About Style by Stacy London, read by Madeline, on 03/17/2013

The author, the style savant cohost of TLC’s What Not to Wear examines the universal obstacles all women, including herself, put in their way. With her unique talent for seeing past disastrous wardrobes to the core emotional issues that caused these sartorial crises, she has transformed not only the looks but also the lives of hundreds of guests who have appeared on What Not to Wear. Now for the first time in print, she not only shares the principles of how to dress well, and why you should, but also examines the reasons why so many women don’t. She moves beyond the often intimidating seasonal trends of fashion, which so often leave women feeling inadequate and judgmental about their own bodies, to the more valuable and enduring concept of style: a way to dress that enhances and celebrates who they really are. And she turns that expert X-ray insight on herself. Like the women she’s transformed, she has plenty of emotional baggage. At eleven, she suffered from severe psoriasis that left her with permanent physical and mental scars. During college, she became anorexic on a misguided quest for perfection. By the time she joined the staff at Vogue, her weight had doubled from binge eating. Although self-esteem and self-consciousness nearly sabotaged a promising career, she learned the hard way that we wear our insecurities every day. It wasn’t until she found the self-confidence to develop a strong personal style that she finally became comfortable in her skin. In this book she shares her own often painful history and her philosophy of the healing power of personal style, illustrating it with a series of detailed “start-overs” with eight real women, demonstrating how personal style helps them overcome the emotional obstacles we all face. For anyone who has ever despaired of finding the right clothes, or even taking an objective assessment in a full-length mirror, this book is a guide to finding the expression of your truest self.

If you spend a lot of time at flea markets and antique malls this book might interest you. Maureen followed an expert on antiques and how to make money buying and reselling. You also learn a lot about
the people who are hooked and those who go to auctions. It’s a hobby for me but a life style for many. Every object has a use and a history. It may not mean a lot to you but it did to the previous owner. A lot of people are experts in certain areas like china or tools. Before you head out to a swap meet read this book and it might help your buying skills.

24. March 2013 · Comments Off · Categories: History, Informational Book, NonFiction, Tracy · Tags:

Play Me Something Quick and Devilish by Howard Wight Marshall, read by Tracy, on 02/21/2013

Since I live in Missouri and enjoy bluegrass and old-time music this book was very interesting. Also nice that it has a cd with samples of different styles of fiddling. I also found a cd on Spotify with Howard Marshall playing. Lots of photos. Missouri is full of talented fiddlers.