11. February 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Business, Helen, NonFiction

Good Boss, Bad Boss: How to Be the Best... and Learn from the Worst by Robert I. Sutton, read by Helen, on 02/28/2012

Now with a new chapter that focuses on what great bosses really do. Dr. Sutton reveals new insights that he’s learned since the writing of Good Boss, Bad Boss. Sutton adds revelatory thoughts about such legendary bosses as Ed Catmull, Steve Jobs, A.G. Lafley, and many more, and how you can implement their techniques.
If you are a boss who wants to do great work, what can you do about it?Good Boss, Bad Boss is devoted to answering that question. Stanford Professor Robert Sutton weaves together the best psychological and management research with compelling stories and cases to reveal the mindset and moves of the best (and worst) bosses. This book was inspired by the deluge of emails, research, phone calls, and conversations that Dr. Sutton experienced after publishing his blockbuster bestseller The No Asshole Rule. He realized that most of these stories and studies swirled around a central figure in every workplace: THE BOSS. These heart-breaking, inspiring, and sometimes funny stories taught Sutton that most bosses – and their followers – wanted a lot more than just a jerk-free workplace. They aspired to become (or work for) an all-around great boss, somebody with the skill and grit to inspire superior work, commitment, and dignity among their charges.
As Dr. Sutton digs into the nitty-gritty of what the best (and worst) bosses do, a theme runs throughout Good Boss, Bad Boss - which brings together the diverse lessons and is a hallmark of great bosses: They work doggedly to “stay in tune” with how their followers (and superiors, peers, and customers too) react to what they say and do. The best bosses are acutely aware that their success depends on having the self-awareness to control their moods and moves, to accurately interpret their impact on others, and to make adjustments on the fly that continuously spark effort, dignity, and pride among their people.

Now-You-See-It-Davidson-Cathy-Davidson’s book is about a mismatch of our education system and what people need in order to succeed in today’s world.  She argues that the 4th great Information Technology Revolution requires us to change our educational institutions as well as our workplaces.  One example she tackles is the use of multi-choice questions on tests, do they really make sense anymore, given the ease with which so much information is available at our finger-tips on the internet.

Our schools and educational system were designed for the last century, reflecting the values and needs of the Industrial Age in which they were created not for a world in which technology has reshaped the way we think and learn.  Therefore the emphasis on standardized tests of reading, writing, and arithmetic is a sentimental reaction a longing for the past.

She points to a magnet school in Durham NC, that is on the failing list, everyone is trying really hard, but with 30% of the students being non-native English speakers those standardized tests may flunk a school out of existence.

She makes the point that we ought to see people as differently abled, instead of disabled.  For example, there’s this company SonyaLista who trains certain people to check for computer-code mistakes, “Normals” are bad at this task, however, people with Autism-Spectrum, make superb checkers of computer-code mistakes.

One problem I had with her book is that she stretched her evidence to make her points.  For example, she points to the fact that computer games can help seniors with visual-spatial field perception.  While this is true, the very best thing you can do to help brain functioning at any age, bnow you see itut particularly at older ages, is to perform physical exercise.  She fails to mention this fact.

21. June 2012 · Comments Off · Categories: Business, NonFiction, Tammy · Tags:

Purple Cow: Transform Your Business by Being Remarkable by Seth Godin, read by Tammy, on 06/02/2012

I’ll admit it I picked this book up because of the purple Holstein pattern on the book and then checked it out for the title.

It’s an interesting read for those concerned with business, marketing and reaching new customers. I think it could give you some good ideas for a business or for a non-profit and even a library. I think it’s main message is we can’t just keep doing everything the same and still stay vital and important to our community and customer base. We need to keep striving to improve, be memorable and provide excellent service.