I had never read anything by Laurie Notaro before picking up this book, but I just might have to read more. She is hilarious and the situations she finds herself in are laugh out loud funny. Highlights of the book include her feud with the local post office where she was banned for wanting too many two cent stamps, being banned from the neighborhood Christmas party because she dared to mouth the words to Jingle Bells, and the dog bark translator. Really all the chapters were hilarious so it is hard to pick favorites. Read it and I dare you not to laugh!

27. February 2015 · Write a comment · Categories: How To's, Informational Book, Noelle, NonFiction

Bright bazaar : embracing color for make-you-smile style by Will Taylor, photographs by Andrew Boyd, 191 pages, read by Noelle, on 02/19/2015

I love color and I love Will Taylor’s style.  Bright and beautiful!

Known for his bold and refreshing take on color, Will Taylor, the founder of Bright Bazaar, one of the world’s leading interior design blogs, shares his secrets to choosing colors that work for every room in your house. Structured around the different spaces within the home, the book breaks down the how, when, and where of using different shades and color combinations. Will’s fun and lighthearted approach shows the reader how to look around for color inspiration and how to start to incorporate colors into both the smaller and larger components of a room like walls, floors, furniture, fabrics, and accessories.Beautifully photographed inspirational examples will be accompanied by “Color Scrapbooks” which break each room down to the individual elements drawing the reader into the details that make each colorful space successful. With pearls of “Will’s Wisdom”, like top painting tips or how to add temporary color, and recipes for “Color Cocktails” in a range of palettes, Taylor’s vibrant and easy-to-follow guide to color and its ability to transform our homes and our lives offers readers the confidence they need to perfect their color choices.

content provided by Syndetics™, a Bowker service.

 

27. February 2015 · Write a comment · Categories: Fiction, Kira, Teen Books, Teen Books · Tags:

Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell, 438 pages, read by Kira, on 02/26/2015

fangirlTwin sisters, Cath and Wren (their mother had prepared only one name for one child – Cather-Wren) had been really tight after their mother abandoned her daughters and bipolar husband years ago.    Now that its time to head off to college, Wren the extrovert wants more space, wants her own roommate, and doesn’t want Cath around much.  Cath the awkward introvert feels abandoned by Wren, especially when Wren reconnects with their mother.  Cath has coped by writing fanfiction for a series called Simon Snow – a Harry-Potteresque fantasy series (Wren used to help her).  Simon Snow books were what got the sisters through the rough times, through their abandonment, through their father’s hospitalization, etc.  Cath continues to write Simon Snow stories – much to the annoyance of her tough-girl roommate Reagon.  Then there’s Reagon’s boyfriend Levi who hangs around their room all the time.  Rowell writes great love scenes – only light kissing is detailed, but she makes it seem so hot!

Not everything is explained, like the reason from Wren wanting distance, nor why their mother is so shallow.  Nonetheless a fabulous read!

I am loving Rainbow Rowell’s books.  Rainbow Rowell’s next book will be about Simon Snow – the story within the story – I can’t wait!

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18594358“Get Up” is a book that explores the detrimental health consequences of our chair-addicted society. Humans are not meant to sit all day, and doing so results in a wide array of issues from back pain to obesity. “Get Up” is a fascinating read, and it has inspired me to move more through my day and maybe even get a treadmill desk. The only problem with this book is that it didn’t give much practical day to day advice for people to be more active and less chair-addicted.

25. February 2015 · Write a comment · Categories: History, Kim B, NonFiction · Tags:

Hitler Youth by Michael H. Kater, 356 pages, read by Kim B, on 02/20/2015

hitler youthThis book gives a good history of how children and teenagers were raised and trained with National Socialist propaganda. The author uses case histories of real people who had grown up during that era in that situation. The book also tells us how these children came to grips with what they had been through long after they had grown into adulthood.

23. February 2015 · Write a comment · Categories: Children's Books, Informational Book, NonFiction, Sarah, Science

The World's Oddest Inventions by Nadia Higgins, 32 pages, read by Sarah, on 02/17/2015

  This book is full of entertaining inventions that came from a need or was just dreamed of and followed through.  Things like smittens, a toaster that will burn images in the side of your toast, or a baby cage that hangs out of your apartment window are just a few that are mentioned.  This book will definitely make you smile.

20. February 2015 · Comments Off · Categories: Autobiographies, NonFiction, Paula

Neil Patrick Harris: Choose Your Own Autobiography by Harris, Neil Patrick, 294 pages, read by Paula, on 02/19/2015

hw7.plTired of memoirs that only tell you what really happened?
Sick of deeply personal accounts written in the first person? Seeking an exciting, interactive read that puts the “u” back in “aUtobiography”? Then look no further than Neil Patrick Harris: Choose Your Own Autobiography! In this revolutionary, Joycean experiment in light celebrity narrative, actor/personality/carbon-based-life-form Neil Patrick Harris lets you, the reader, live his life. You will be born to New Mexico. You will get your big break at an acting camp. You will get into a bizarre confrontation outside a nightclub with actor Scott Caan. Even better, at each critical juncture of your life you will choose how to proceed. You will decide whether to try out for Doogie Howser, M.D. You will decide whether to spend years struggling with your sexuality. You will decide what kind of caviar you want to eat on board Elton John’s yacht.

Choose correctly and you’ll find fame, fortune, and true love. Choose incorrectly and you’ll find misery, heartbreak, and a hideous death by piranhas. All this, plus magic tricks, cocktail recipes, embarrassing pictures from your time as a child actor, and even a closing song. Yes, if you buy one book this year, congratulations on being above the American average, and make that book Neil Patrick Harris: Choose Your Own Autobiography!

 

19. February 2015 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Biographies, Children's Books, History, Informational Book, NonFiction

Choosing Courage: True Stories of Heroism from Soldiers and Civilians by Peter Collier, 240 pages, read by Angie, on 02/18/2015

Choosing Courage is a wonderful book filled with stories about Medal of Honor recipients. The book spans WWI through the present day. The story of how each recipient earned the Medal of Honor is told in detail. I was surprised at how many of the recipients received their Medal many years after the fact. Seems that even distinguished service and heroism could not overcome racism during our history. It was good to hear that Congress did extensive reviews and awarded the Medal of Honor to deserving minorities who were overlooked however. A common theme running through all the stories was the fact that the men and women believed they were just doing what they were supposed to do and what anyone else would have done. The fact that they were heroes and saved the lives of many of their comrades just made their selfless acts that much more heroic.

I received a copy of this book from Netgalley.com.

19. February 2015 · Comments Off · Categories: Children's Books, History, Lisa, NonFiction

Searching for Sarah Rector by Tonya Bolden, 80 pages, read by Lisa, on 02/18/2015

Sarah Rector was once famously hailed as “the richest black girl in America.” Set against the backdrop of American history, her tale encompasses the creation of Indian Territory, the making of Oklahoma, and the establishment of black towns and oil-rich boomtowns.
Rector acquired her fortune at the age of eleven. This is both her story and that of children just like her: one filled with ups and downs amid bizarre goings-on and crimes perpetrated by greedy and corrupt adults. From a trove of primary documents, including court and census records and interviews with family members, author Tonya Bolden painstakingly pieces together the events of Sarah’s life and the lives of those around her.
The book includes a glossary, a bibliography, and an index.

Description from Goodreads.com.

12. February 2015 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Children's Books, History, Informational Book, NonFiction

Sneaker Century: A History of Athletic Shoes by Amber J. Keyser, 64 pages, read by Angie, on 02/12/2015

The history of sneakers is an interesting one. It is kind of hard to believe that they have only been around a bit over 100 years since they are a constant part of our lives now. Sneaker Century takes the reader through the history of sneakers from the very first ones in the 1800s to modern celebrity-designed ones today. I found the history fascinating. I know almost nothing about sneaker brands other than their names so this was definitely an education for me. I learned that two brothers started a shoe company in pre-WWII Germany and outfitted some of the Olympic runners. After WWII they fought and broke up the company into Adidas and Puma. I also learned that Keds are one of the oldest sneaker brands. The history of Nike and Reebok are also covered. The one thing I wish the book had more of is pictures. It mentions specific shoes or styles of shoes but doesn’t show what those shoes looks like. I think it would have been stronger with more pictures of actual sneakers.

I received a copy of this book from Netgalley.

12. February 2015 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Children's Books, Informational Book, NonFiction

Running Dry: The Global Water Crisis by Stuart A. Kallen, 64 pages, read by Angie, on 02/12/2015

Running Dry is a very interesting look at the water problems facing the world. The book details the importance of water to the human population, where it comes from and how it is used. Then it deals with the issues facing us in regards to water: pollution, over-use, increasing demand, and climate change. There is a lot of good information in this highly readable book. I found the parts about how much water farms and industry are using especially interesting and was shocked by the attitudes of bottled water companies who do not think clean water is a human right but a commodity with a price. I also thought it was interesting how different countries are dealing with the water shortages they are facing. This is an excellent resource for students and those interested in the issue.

I received this book from Netgalley.

12. February 2015 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Children's Books, History, NonFiction

A Volcano Beneath the Snow: John Brown's War Against Slavery by Albert Marrin, 256 pages, read by Angie, on 02/11/2015

John Brown is an interesting historical figure. Was he a terrorist, a patriot, a martyr? Albert Marrin explores these ideas in this book. He details the life of John Brown, how he came to feel so strongly against slavery and why he began his campaign to free the slaves and dissolve the union. Brown is a fascinating character who had very strong political and religious beliefs in regards to slavery. He had no qualms about committing violence in the name of what he felt was right and just and he also sacrificed the lives of some of his children in the process. Marrin does a great job on John Brown and his life. What he also does is pad this book with a lot of information that makes it less readable. There are several chapters on the history of slavery and several more chapters on the history of the Civil War. Neither are necessary in detailing Brown’s life. In fact, the chapters on Brown really only take up about half the book. I think this is going to turn kids off a bit. I know I skimmed/barely read a lot of the extra chapters because it was all stuff I knew or I didn’t think pertained to the story I was trying to read. I think this book would have been better if it had just focused on John Brown and left the rest to other books.

12. February 2015 · Comments Off · Categories: Adult Books, Cats, Humor, Tammy · Tags: , , ,

The Grumpy Guide to Life: Observations from Grumpy Cat by Grumpy Cat, 112 pages, read by Tammy, on 02/10/2015

grumpy cat Grumpy Cat lends her grumpiness to every situation… even rainbows. Her she presents her de-motivational guide to life, love and friendship. With new photos of her famous Grumpy face and a couple of her in normal cute cat poses (Shhh! don’t tell Grumpy Cat). For anyone with an inner grouch, dark humor or sarcastic streak.

If you are a Grumpy Cat fan you may also want to check out the library’s copy of the Christmas movie, Grumpy Cat’s Worst Christmas Ever on DVD. The movie is actually a little sweeter than I expected but still had some grumpy moments as well as holiday cuteness.

11. February 2015 · Comments Off · Categories: Informational Book, Lisa, NonFiction

Skin Rules: Trade Secrets From a Top New York Dermatologist by Debra Jaliman, 208 pages, read by Lisa, on 02/04/2015

Skin Rules is a concise and practical instruction manual from a renowned Fifth Avenue dermatologist on how to attain beautiful skin, a taut and sculpted body, and a much younger appearance. Actors, models, and newscasters go to Dr. Jaliman for her cutting-edge technology and the latest in skin care, as well as for her reputation for being the “last stop” doctor, the one who fixes what others can’t.

Skin Rules has something for everyone, no matter where they live or how much money they have to spend. This small, invaluable guide supplies the same advice Dr. Jaliman gives to her celebrity patients, from lasers to remove sun damage and turn back the clock to suggestions for simple products and  habits anyone can adopt for a small outlay of time and money.

In Skin Rules readers will learn:
• about the one ingredient that should NEVER be in sunscreens, but often is
• how to use inexpensive Aquaphor to heal wounds and prevent scarring
• which drugstore products really work for acne and wrinkles

Description from Goodreads.com.

10. February 2015 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, History, Informational Book, NonFiction, Teen Books

Patient Zero: Solving the Mysteries of Deadly Epidemics by Marilee Peters, 166 pages, read by Angie, on 02/10/2015

Patient Zero is a look at epidemics of the past and how doctors and scientists found what or who was causing them. The epidemics covered were the plague, cholera, yellow fever, typhoid, Spanish flu, ebola and AIDS. Each chapter focused on the “patient zero” who was the first to get the disease and start spreading it. It is a pretty interesting read with lots of good historical information. However, it is not a book for research. The diseases are covered pretty thoroughly but in a more surface way than would be needed for reports or assignments. I think kids who are interested in this type of thing will really enjoy this more for pleasure reading.

My one gripe with the book is actually the illustrations. There are clip art type pictures throughout the book instead of actual photos or historical data. I thought the pictures didn’t fit with the text and actually distracted me from the seriousness of what I was reading.

I received this book from Netgalley.

10. February 2015 · Comments Off · Categories: Fiction, Sarah, Teen Books

Playlist for the Dead by Michelle Falkoff, 281 pages, read by Sarah, on 02/09/2015

Sam’s best friend, Hayden, commits suicide after a fight at a party.  He leaves a playlist of music for Sam to listen to and a note that says the playlist will explain everything.  Sam is hurt, confused, guilty, and wondering what he missed that night that could have changed the way things turned out.  A friend of Hayden’s, who Sam doesn’t know anything about, shows up and starts to shed some light on that last night’s events.

This was a sad mystery of sorts as I tried to figure out who was behind the “paying back” of the bullies that let this escalate so drastically.  It needed to come with a cd of the music referenced to help me understand it even better.  I was tempted to go to i-tunes more than once!  It was a good book.

09. February 2015 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Humor, NonFiction

My Planet: Finding Humor in the Oddest Places by Mary Roach, 160 pages, read by Angie, on 02/08/2015

My Planet is a collection of writings Mary Roach did for Reader’s Digest. They are short, humorous stories about her life and her experiences. While I found them funny and enjoyed listening to this book I don’t think it lives up to her other books. It is a worthwhile read (or listen) but if you are looking for the quality of Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers or Bonk: The Curious Coupling of Science and Sex you will be disappointed. The one thing I did enjoy was the husband Ed. He and Mary must be absolutely perfect for each other.

04. February 2015 · Comments Off · Categories: How To's, Informational Book, Kristy, NonFiction, Self Help · Tags:

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing by Marie Kondō, 213 pages, read by Kristy, on 01/20/2015

22318578In an attempt to de-clutter my home for the new year, I read The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up. Though there were some tips that I found unnecessary (fold you socks like a sushi roll!), I did take to heart a handful of Marie Kondo’s tricks. She advises that people clean by category (first clothes, then paperwork, then miscellaneous, etc) which is actually easier than room by room. She also advises to only keeping items that spark joy in you. Her process has led to me getting rid of about 1/3 of my possessions, and my house feels much more peaceful. It’s definitely worth a read if you wish to organize your closets and your life in general.

03. February 2015 · Comments Off · Categories: Kristy, NonFiction · Tags:

Haunted Air: Anonymous Halloween photographs from c. 1875–1955 by Ossian Brown, 216 pages, read by Kristy, on 01/14/2015

9462270Haunted Air is a book that displays a wide array of old Halloween photos from the late 1800’s to mid 1900’s. These photos are both creepy and entertaining! It’s fascinating to see how children (and impoverished adults) dressed up for Halloween all those years ago.

Down Size: 12 Truths for Turning Pants-Splitting Frustration into Pants-Fitting SuccessWritten by Ted Spiker, author of several health books, Down Size is a book about the “twelve truths about successful weight loss.” I did find some of these truths to be useful, but Ted’s constant self deprecating humor left me feeling uncomfortable. Down Size seemed geared more toward overweight men with a competitive streak. Since I am not a man and I’m not into competitive physical activities, I didn’t glean as much valuable information from this book as I had hoped.