06. October 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Apocalyptic, Fiction, Science Fiction, Teen Books

The 5th Wave by Rick Yancey, 480 pages, read by Angie, on 10/05/2014

So aliens have invaded the earth. First they set off an emp that took out everything electrical, then there were the tsunamis that took out the coasts, then came the red death that killed billions, and then there were the silencers (aliens who look like humans). Now the survivors are just trying to survive and prepare for whatever comes next. Cassie has survived with most of her family. Cassie, her dad and her brother are at a refugee camp when military vehicles arrive and take the children away (adults are supposedly leaving later). Of course the military lies and kills everyone else at the camp except Cassie. She is determined to keep her promise to her little brother Sammy though and find him. But in a world where anyone can be the enemy who can you trust? Ben has recovered from the red death and has been recruited into the new military at Camp Haven. All the recruits are kids, some as young as five, and are all being trained to kill. Ben takes young Sammy under his wing and promises to protect him. Meanwhile Cassie has been shot by a silencer but rescued by hotty Evan Walker. She isn’t sure she can trust him but he sure is dreamy with his beautiful eyes and soft hands. She is still determined to rescue Sammy and decides she might need Evan’s help.

There were times when I really wanted to quit reading this book. I think it started about the time Evan appeared and Cassie lost all sense. It is the end of the world and she has seen so much death and destruction. I liked her when she was the crazy person in the woods, but once she started thinking about how dreamy Evan was I was pretty much done. He is basically a stalker and a killer who had no real redeeming qualities other than the fact that he saved her life. I hate when a romance element is forced into a story and this one was more egregious then most. It just really didn’t make any sense in the plot of the book. The plot itself, while not original, was at least a bit entertaining. I am not sure why teen books always have to use the child soldiers theme but whatever. The aliens are out to get us all and make us do all the work ok sure. The end of the book where everything comes together and Cassie and Ben meet up in their quests to save Sammy made the book at least a bit worth the read.

06. October 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Children's Books, Dystopia, Fiction, Science Fiction

The 8th Continent by Matt London, 224 pages, read by Angie, on 10/04/2014

The earth in the future is being taken over by garbage and bureaucracy. Rick and Evie and their dad get in trouble with Winterpole after saving a bird whose habitat has become a landfill. Because of previous infractions dad is placed under house arrest, but not before he tells the kids about a secret formula he created years ago that would turn garbage into organic material. Winterpole found out about it and wanted to use it to make weapons (not sure how that would work) so dad and his partner split the formula and the partner disappeared. The kids are determined to find the partner and create an 8th continent out of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. Then they would be out from under Winterpole’s control. They are pursued by by Evie’s nemesis Vesuvia who is the secret CEO of her dad’s corporation and determined to turn everything in the world into pink plastic.

I’m not sure how believable this book is supposed to be, but I hope not very is the answer. Everything about it seems so far-fetched and unbelievable that it was difficult to get through at times. I liked the premise however and the writing was fun and entertaining. The characters were a bit one-dimensional especially Vesuvia and the Winterpole people. This book is the first in a planned series and the ending sets up the next book nicely. Even though much of the book makes no sense whatsoever I can see kids picking it up and enjoying the ride.

29. September 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Children's Books, Eric, Fiction, Mystery, Science Fiction

Found by Margaret Peterson Haddix, 314 pages, read by Eric, on 09/07/2014

An unscheduled, pilot-less passenger jet arrives at an airport gate. In each seat is an unattended baby. Thirteen years later, cryptic messages are being sent to these children, many of which don’t realize they were adopted, let alone that they are connected to the mysterious plane. Jonah and Chip have received messages, and are determined to find out why.

The search for answers to the children’s mysterious beginnings makes for a decent mystery adventure. The payoff isn’t quite what I had hoped for, but it certainly sets the stage for many sequels, and adventures through time. I’m interested in continuing, but not with much enthusiasm.

22. September 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Children's Books, Fiction, Science Fiction

My Zombie Hamster by Havelock McCreely, 208 pages, read by Angie, on 09/20/2014

All Matt wants for Christmas is a Runesword so he can play the game with his friends online. What he gets is a hamster named Snuffles. Then Snuffles dies and turns into a zombie hamster. Snuffles escapes outside and starts building his zombie pet army, turning all the pets and animals in town into zombies. Of course there are people who are zombies also, but they are all outside of the town walls. Matt and his friends Charlie, Calvin and Aren devise several plans to stop Snuffles before he is discovered and Matt and his family get in trouble. All of these fail miserably. Then Charlie dies and becomes a zombie, but she isn’t like the others. She still has her personality and doesn’t want to eat brains. She is a new breed of zombie. Of course not everyone wants to find that out.

I am sure young boys will love this book. It is funny and gross and has zombies. I didn’t think it was that great, but then I am not a young boy. The story was engaging and entertaining and at least kept my interest. It was a little light on the whys though. Why did Snuffles build a zombie pet army? Why was the mayor so obnoxious yet was still the mayor? Why were there zombies in the first place?

22. September 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Children's Books, Fiction, Science Fiction

Game of Clones: The Clone Chronicles #3 by M.E. Castle, 256 pages, read by Angie, on 09/20/2014

Third book in the Clone Chronicles series; I haven’t read the first two. Fisher and his clone Two are living at his house and Two is in hiding. The evil clone Three is out there in the world somewhere and bound to wreck havoc. Fisher and Two get into trouble at school and Fisher finally fesses up about Two to his parents. Shortly after that Three launches his evil attack turning everyone grouchy and mean. Fisher and Two (now named Alex) must come up with a plan to stop Three before he takes over the world, or destroys it. Can’t say I was that impressed with this book. It is very light on the plausibility scale and the story was just too far-fetched for me. I am sure this series has fans but I am not one of them. I would probably give it to boys who like comic books and superheroes and stories that don’t rely to heavily on reality.

04. September 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Children's Books, Fantasy, Fiction, Mystery, Science Fiction

The Time of the Fireflies by Kimberley Griffiths Little, 368 pages, read by Angie, on 09/03/2014

Larissa is bitter about the scar on her face. The scar that was caused when she was pushed through the old Bayou Bridge by Alyson Granger and her friends. Larissa and her family have a long history in Bayou Bridge but her mamma doesn’t like being back in town. She is bitter about Larissa’s accident and the fact that her own sister drowned in the bayou when the bridge was hit by lightning. Larissa gets a mysterious phone call from someone telling her to trust the fireflies. Only problem is the phone isn’t connected to anything. The fireflies keep trying to lead her across the bridge to the island where her family used to live. When she makes it to the island she discovers she has been transported to 1912 and witnesses events in the life of her ancestor Anna. She also witnesses events in the life of each subsequent generation. In each generation there is some kind of tragedy and the creepy doll Anna Marie is always present. Larissa has to figure out what it all means before the doll strikes again and hurts her mamma who is pregnant with her baby sister. 

This was a pretty captivating mystery if you suspend your disbelief a bit. There is no explanation given for the magic of the fireflies or how Larissa receives the phone call from the future. The doll also doesn’t really get a very good explanation, but I did enjoy the journey Larissa went on to figure everything out. I think more important than the mystery of the doll and the family tragedies was Larissa coming to terms with her scar. She was so fixated on the scar and her hatred for Alyson that it blinded her to actual events. Once she came to terms with everything things started to become clearer. It was a nice added part of the story. 

I received this book from Netgalley.

03. September 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Adult Books, Fiction, Science Fiction, Tammy · Tags: , ,

William Shakespeare's The Empire Striketh Back by Ian Doescher, 172 pages, read by Tammy, on 09/01/2014

emperor strikethFor all those fans of Star Wars who are also fans of the bard… comes this new trilogy of plays. This is the second book in the series that picks up the Elizabethan space adventure of young Luke and his trusty droids, C3-P0 and R2-D2. Told in beautiful verse and iambic pentameter experience the story of Star Wars as you never have before.

03. September 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Adult Books, Fiction, Science Fiction, Tammy · Tags: ,

William Shakespeare's The Jedi Doth Return by Ian Doescher, 165 pages, read by Tammy, on 09/02/2014

jedi doth returnThe final play in this trilogy of Elizabethan space adventure. Complete with rebels, droids, a power mad emperor and a dashing young hero. All in iambic pentameter of course and
illustrated with beautiful black-and-white Elizabethan-style artwork.

01. September 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Children's Books, Eric, Fiction, Science Fiction

The Battle for WondLa by Tony DiTerlizzi, 480 pages, read by Eric, on 08/30/2014

This final book in the WondLa trilogy puts Eva Nine amidst the war between humans and alien species, to decide the fate of Orbona. It also illustrates how much she has matured, and how powerful she has become, since The Search for WondLa. She has gained abilities which put her on par with most anyone on the planet, and she will need all of them in order to do her part in stopping the machinations of advisor-turned-usurper, Loroc.

This isn’t my favorite story of the trilogy, but even so, it is far from disappointing. Former antagonists become allies, treachery is revealed, and in the middle of it all is Eva. She is a great character, and her companions just as strong. Their effectiveness is enhanced by DiTerlizzi’s artwork, which is consistently excellent throughout the trilogy. His character and world designs are wonderful, and the perfect guide in case someone wishes to put all this on the big screen. Please?

01. September 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Fantasy, Fiction, Kira, Science Fiction · Tags:

Crucible of Gold by Naomi Novik, 323 pages, read by Kira, on 08/31/2014

Dragon, Temeraire and Capt Lawrence are asked to return to the British Air Force (where dragons serve as airships), after having been dishonorably discharged.  Temeraire is delighted, Capt Lawrence is less thrilled.   Iskierka and her Capt Granby and Kulingile with his Capt Demane.  After several day and nights of storming, the drunken sailors catch the transport ship on fire, and sink the transport ship. More mishaps occur, but eventually they persevere.  I love these characters, and the way they play off each other, though there are so many of them, that it can get confusing.  Here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Temeraire_characters is a list of characters in case you need some refreshing, though it seems to be slanted toward the middle of the series.  I also really enjoyed the humor, arising from the clash of duty/protocol and doing the right thing; the humor arising from the clash between Temeraire and Izkierka.  Novik has developed these wonderful characters.  There are also some realistic losses experienced by these military engagements.
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28. August 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Adult Books, Fantasy, Fiction, Judy, Science Fiction · Tags:

Anansi Boys by Neil Gaiman, 336 pages, read by Judy, on 08/27/2014

When Fat Charlie’s dad named something, it stuck.  Like calling Fat Charlie “Fat Charlie”.  Even now, twenty years later, Charlie Nancy can’t shake that name, one of the many embarrassing “gifts” his father bestowed–before he dropped dead on a karaoke stage and ruined Fat Charlie’s life.

Mr. Nancy left Fat Charlie things.  Things like the tall, good-looking stranger who appears on Charlie’s doorstep, who appears to be the brother he never knew.   A brother as different from Charlie as night is from day, a brother who’s going to show Charlie how to lighten up and have a little fun . . . just like Dear Old Dad.   And all of a sudden, life starts getting very interesting for Fat Charlie.

Because, you see, Charlie’s dad wasn’t just any dad.  He was Anansi, a trickster god, the spider-god.   Anansi is the spirit of rebellion, able to overturn the social order, create wealth out of thin air, and baffle the devil.    Some said he could cheat even Death himself.

 

27. August 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Dystopia, Fiction, Jane, Science Fiction, Teen Books

In The After by Demitria Lunetta, 455 pages, read by Jane, on 08/21/2014

They hear the most silent of footsteps.
They are faster than anything you’ve ever seen.
And They won’t stop chasing you…until you are dead.

Amy is watching TV when it happens, when the world is attacked by Them. These vile creatures are rapidly devouring mankind. Most of the population is overtaken, but Amy manages to escape—and even rescue “Baby,” a toddler left behind in the chaos. Marooned in Amy’s house, the girls do everything they can to survive—and avoid Them at all costs.

After years of hiding, they are miraculously rescued and taken to New Hope, a colony of survivors living in a former government research compound. While at first the colony seems like a dream with plenty of food, safety, and shelter, New Hope slowly reveals that it is far from ideal. And Amy soon realizes that unless things change, she’ll lose Baby—and much more.

Rebellious, courageous, and tender, this unforgettable duo will have you on the edge of your seat as you tear through the pulse-pounding narrow escapes and horrifying twists of fate in this thrilling debut from author Demitria Lunetta.

27. August 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Apocalyptic, Fiction, Science Fiction, Teen Books · Tags:

Fire & Ash by Jonathan Maberry, 537 pages, read by Angie, on 08/26/2014

I am not sure why it took me so long to get around to reading this final book in Jonathan Maberry’s Rot & Ruin series. I love this series and I loved this book. It was the perfect ending to the series. 

Benny and the gang have made it across the desert and to the safe haven of Sanctuary. Of course nothing is quite what it seems. The military staff at Sanctuary is very secretive and won’t tell them anything about what is happening. The Reapers led by Saint John are still out there and headed to the Nine Towns. Chong was bitten in the last book and is becoming more and more like a zombie. This is the first time Benny, Nix, Lilah and Riot have a chance to take a moment and take stock of themselves and what they have discovered in the Rot & Ruin. They are not the same people they were when they started this trip to find the mysterious plane. They thought they would find all the answers and all they found were more questions. There is also the case of the missing Dr. McReady. She was supposed to be on the plane they found in the desert and she supposedly has a cure for the reaper plague. The teens set off with Captain Joe Ledger to find her and the cure and bring an end to the zombie nightmare. 

What I love about this series is the fact that even though it is about zombies it really isn’t about zombies. It is about the inhumanity of man and how without society’s strictures man becomes the monster. Zombies are just mindless disease carriers. They have no thought or rationale, but man chooses to do evil or good. This theme is more explicitly stated in this book than in some of the others, but it is an important theme. Benny has to find the person who can fight and win against Saint John. He has to do decide if doing what has to be done to win will make him cross that line in becoming a monster himself. In some ways this book is about redemption; the redemption of Benny, Chong, Nix, Lilah, Riot and even Joe and the redemption of mankind. Is mankind worthy of saving? Or should they allow everyone to be released to the darkness. I really loved how this series ended; it was perfect and felt natural. Humanity is worth saving and there is hope in the world.

24. August 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Fairy Tales and Folklore, Fiction, Science Fiction, Tammy, Teen Books · Tags:

Cress by Marissa Meyer, 552 pages, read by Tammy, on 08/07/2014

cressThe continuing story of the cyborg Cinder and her ragamuffin group of friends trying to save the people of the Earth and Luna (the moon) from the evil queen of Luna, Levana. Cinder, Captain Thorne, Scarlet and Wolf discover a girl imprisoned on a satellite. Believing she has information and skills that can help them overthrow Levana they set out to rescue Cress.

When the daring rescue goes awry the group ends up separated. Meanwhile Queen Levana moves along the wedding plans to Emperor Kai. Can Cinder rescue her friends before it’s too late. What will Cinder decide about her own future. Can she give up her freedom to save all the rest of inhabitants of Earth?

 

22. August 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Dystopia, Fiction, Science Fiction, Teen Books · Tags:

Expiration Day by William Campbell Powell, 336 pages, read by Angie, on 08/22/2014

The year is 2049 and humanity is becoming infertile. Very few babies are being born which has led to “the troubles”. In order to end the troubles, a company called Oxted started manufacturing robot babies. Parents can adopt the babies and pretend everything is normal. The children go back to Oxted periodically for upgrades so they can seem to grow. No one is supposed to know who is a robot and who is a human kid even the kids themselves. However, during the teen years the robot kids sometimes do something that breaks the veneer of humanity and the parents can’t deal so they send them back to Oxted. Doesn’t really matter anyway because all the kids have to be returned at 18 to be recycled. What a lovely future!

Tania is 11 when the book starts. She thinks she is human until she falls into the Thames and doesn’t drown. Once she realizes she is a robot she embraces her robothood (after a few days of cranky). She has made friends with John and Sian and together they form a band; later they are joined by Kieran to round out the sound. Tania starts exploring the TelNet (internet) to see what she can find out about Oxted and what is going on with humanity; however, this plot point doesn’t last very long. The novel is told through Tania’s diary entries in which she writes to a future alien Mr. Zog. Of course Mr. Zog answers her posts from the future where he is reading about earth in some kind of archive. 

The story is pretty slow and drags a lot as we are just hearing Tania’s side of the story and she is mostly talking about her day-to-day life. The idea of the book was an intriguing one but the execution was pretty terrible. None of the characters actually seemed like real people to me; they didn’t talk like real people or act like real people. Maybe it was because most of them were robots but I think it was more poor writing. The world building was atrocious. This is set only 35 years in the future, which isn’t really that long, and yet the world has fallen apart. There is no explanation as to why fertility has disappeared or how the robot babies were accepted so quickly. Other than the robots, technology doesn’t seem to have advanced very much either. Other than the fact that there doesn’t appear to be any real book or music or movies anymore because everything is digital. I also thought it was really interesting (kind of dumb) that everyone seemed to only listen to 70s rock bands???? Lots of music was mentioned throughout the book but very little of it was post-1980. Why? The end did not make reading the whole book worth it at all. I wanted more from this story and was really disappointed that I didn’t get it.

19. August 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Fantasy, Fiction, Kira, Science Fiction, Teen Books, Teen Books · Tags: ,

Interworld by Neil Gaiman and Michael Reaves., 239 pages, read by Kira, on 08/19/2014

interworld-by-neil-gaiman-and-michael-reaves Inter_World917 itrs 8dd7103b2bb3074baa5d7ad59f963f3a Interworld-neil-gaiman-1548448-258-410 interwrld Interworld_by_Neil_Gaiman_and_Michael_Reaves_200_312 50130_interworldThe setting is the Multiverse or all the different possible versions of realities our world could have taken. Two factions at opposite ends of the multiverse continuum are fighting for supremacy, destroying worlds with impunity.

In our world Joey Harker takes a wrong turn, and first winds up in a world very similar to our own, except that his mother has a fake arm, and her offspring is a girl Josephine, who looks very much like him, just a female version.  In the next world, it turns out he drowned in the river a couple years ago, instead of having a close brush with death, and getting a huge lecture from his father on water safety.  Another look-alike Joe Harker look-alike J is sent to rescue Joey Harker before the warring factions can use his soul for energy in their never-ending war.  The Joe Harker look-alikes vary widely from girls with wings, to cyborgs with implants.  This was a quick and enjoyable read.  It leaves room for a sequel.  Lastly, I liked the mudluff sidekick.

18. August 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Fiction, Science Fiction, Teen Books · Tags:

Homeland by Cory Doctorow, 396 pages, read by Angie, on 08/17/2014

This is the second Cory Doctorow book I have read and it scared me and made me paranoid just like the first one. Homeland is a followup to Little Brother and follows the same character of Marcus. Marcus and his girlfriend Ange are at Burning Man when they are given a USB stick with confidential information on it and later watch the couple who gave them the info taken away by paramilitary thugs. Back in San Francisco Marcus has to figure out what to do with the thousands of documents full of incriminating information. He is also starting a new job and trying to deal with the fact that his parents have both lost their jobs. There is a lot going on in this book and I will admit that I didn’t understand the majority of the techno jargon. What I did understand was enough to make me paranoid and leary of everything I have ever done online. The scariest part is that this is not fiction; stuff like this is happening around the world as we speak. Cory Doctorow is truly terrifying and I wouldn’t be a bit surprised if someone was hacking him and watching his every move. 

11. August 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Apocalyptic, Fiction, Science Fiction, Teen Books · Tags:

The Rule of Three by Eric Walters, 405 pages, read by Angie, on 08/10/2014

Adam is helping his friend Todd with a paper in their high school computer lab when all the sudden the power goes out. And it is not just out in the school, but all over town and the world. Turns out everything with a computer chip is fried. Fortunately, Adam has a pre-computer car and is able to get home. His mom is a police captain and his dad is an airline pilot stuck in Chicago. His neighbor Herb is an ex-CIA operative (never stated but assumed) who is ready for the apocalypse and quickly takes charge. Soon their neighborhood has checkpoints and a census of people’s skills and walls to protect them. The world has ended but these people can still be good people and help each other out. Of course there are bad people out there. People are fleeing the cities and turning on each other. 

This book reminded me so much of the TV show Revolution. Of course this covers the beginning of the power failure not several years in and there are no supernatural elements. I thought it was frighteningly realistic in its portrayal of what would happen if everything went dark. People would not be prepared and there would be panic. I liked all the details of how the neighborhood came together and how they organized themselves. However, I did think there were a few things that were just too good to be true. Herb for one is a fabulous character but so over the top prepared and knowledgeable that it seemed almost unrealistic. I also thought it was interesting that their neighborhood never really suffered. They had plenty of doctors and security and weaponry and know-how to make everything almost normal. It was like the best possible group of people lived in the same neighborhood so they could survive the apocalypse together. I was also a little disappointed in the conflict with the “bad” group. I was expecting to read about an actual conflict but again it was the best possible outcome for our intrepid group. I really enjoyed the book and thought it was fairly realistic for an apocalypse story; however, I wanted the realism to extend into the characters and their circumstance which didn’t happen. 

07. August 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Fiction, Science Fiction, Teen Books · Tags:

Don't Even Think About It by Sarah Mlynowski, 336 pages, read by Angie, on 08/07/2014

Homeroom 10B got there flu shots one day. By the next day they could hear other people’s thoughts. They were confused, afraid and more than a little thrilled with their new super powers. It turns out hearing other people’s thoughts has its good and bad points. We find out that Mackenzie cheated on Cooper, Cooper’s parents are getting a divorce, that Teddy doesn’t really like Tess like she likes him. There are no secrets safe from the espies (as they call themselves). Some want to continue with their secret, others want to tell someone and get help. Do they all have to stick together?

This book was a lot of fun. Sure the kids are your typical high school kids: a bit whiny, a bit selfish, a bit horny, but they are highly entertaining. I liked the mix of personalities and reactions to getting ESP. I didn’t realize this was the start of a series when I picked it up but it could be a very entertaining one. Not a lot of substance to the story, but a lot of fun. 

06. August 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Adult Books, Courtney, Graphic Novel, Science Fiction

FBP: Federal Bureau of Physics, Vol. 1: The Paradigm Shift by Simon Oliver, 160 pages, read by Courtney, on 07/08/2014

For all your physics-related emergencies, there’s only one entity to call: the FBP. Whether it’s just a localized loss of gravity or a full-blown bubble universe threatening to consume an entire city block, the FBP is there. Or they were until a mission goes horribly wrong and the political forces pushing for privatization get the perfect opportunity to discredit the FBP. Now, there are only a handful of dedicated agents left and the private industry is taking over. Adam Hardy has been dutifully serving FBP for years, but when he and his partner get caught up in a collapsing “bubbleverse”, Adam begins to realize that a conspiracy is at play and has been for years. Adam’s father died in a similar situation and the dots are now starting to connect for Adam.
This new comic series has a fantastic premise that is, by and large, well executed. The artwork is lovely and has a very organic feel to it, in spite of its somewhat unusual color palette. I didn’t really feel like I got to know Adam as a character very well, but there’s plenty of time for his character to develop. Adam’s new partner, Rosa, is a welcome addition to the otherwise predominantly male cast. FBP also gets bonus points for having not just one, but two POC main characters.