14. May 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Adult Books, Fantasy, Fiction, Graphic Novel, Kira · Tags:

The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern, read by Kira, on 05/13/2014

 

The book starts out slow.  It is the story of 2 youngsters trained in the magical arts as opponents in a challenge.  The venue for competition is the Night Circus.  Their respective masters omit informing them of important rules of the game, like how a winner is determined.

night_circus___celia_and_marco_by_acbunny-d60u8rythe_night_circus___celia__s_library_by_sombrewood-d5e00xk01a624d91a48461261ac67cdfc3c6a88AlemanhaI found timeline a night_circus__the_clock_by_thesearchingeyes-d5laf5vbit cos-NIGHT-CIRCUS-large640Night_Circus_Hero_groupnfusing.NightCircus_AFthe_night_circus___widget_and_poppet_by_eizurin-d4i1ce0Night Circus 0911  But once I got into the book, I found it magical, very atmospheric and a bit mysterious.  I like the way the different story-lines blend together.

14. May 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Adult Books, Fiction, Graphic Novel, Humor, Kira · Tags:

Agent Gates and the Secret Adventures of Devonton Abbey: (a parody) by Camaren Subhiyah, read by Kira, on 05/12/2014

Agent GatesAh – my Downton Abbey addiction can be revived!  This month’s challenge is Graphic Novels, and I was lucky that my coworker recommended this title to magent batese.  It is a parody, poking fun at a variety of aspects of the show, particularly, the aristocracy’s treatment of their servants.  The illustrator does an excellent job of drawing characters with distinctly recognizable physical characteristics of the TV characters.  Even the names are clever.  Bates is Gates, Thomas Barrow is Thompson Sparrow, Anna is Joanna, Daisy is Poppy.  Funny stuff!

10. May 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Fantasy, Fiction, Graphic Novel, Teen Books

The Books of Magic by Neil Gaiman, read by Angie, on 05/10/2014

Timothy Hunter is approached by four strange men. These men talk of magic and offer to show Tim the magical world. He is sent to the past with the Phantom Stranger. He learns about magic in the present day with John Constantine. He travels to other realms with Dr. Occult. And he is taken to the end of the universe with Mister E. Along the way he is pursued, tempted, tricked and educated. All of this is to give him the choice of a life of magic or a life of science. But does he really have a choice? I enjoyed this book and its look into the world of magic; however, I do think I would have gotten more of the references if I had been reading other comics related to this one. It seems like many of the characters are drawn from other stories, which I haven’t read, so I didn’t get as excited by their appearances as I would have if I knew who they were.

10. May 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Contemporary Fiction, Fiction, Graphic Novel, Teen Books

Yummy: The Last Days of a Southside Shorty by G. Neri (Author), Randy DuBurke (Illustrator), read by Angie, on 05/09/2014

During the summer of 1994, Chicago and the nation were glued to the news stories of eleven-year-old Yummy. Yummy was a shorty member of the Black Disciples trying to prove his worth to the gang leaders. He shot into a crowd of his rivals, but missed them all and instead hit 14-year-old Shavon. The murder of a young girl by an even younger boy shocked the nation and brought the harsh realities of inner-city Chicago to light. Yummy went on the run, but was eventually gunned down by his own gang members when they got tired of all the media coverage. This story is narrated by a fictional classmate of Yummy’s who wants to find out what happened to Yummy and why he turned out the way he did. It is a fast read and one you will not want to put down.

07. May 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Fiction, Graphic Novel, Kristy, Teen Books

American Born Chinese by Gene Luen Yang, read by Kristy, on 04/10/2014

All Jin Wang wants is to fit in. When his family moves to a new neighborhood, he suddenly finds that he’s the only Chinese American student at his school. Jocks and bullies pick on him constantly, and he has hardly any friends. Then, to make matters worse, he falls in love with an all-American girl…

Born to rule over all the monkeys in the world, the story of the Monkey King is one of the oldest and greatest Chinese fables. Adored by his subjects, master of the arts of kung-fu, he is the most powerful monkey on earth. But the Monkey King doesn’t want to be a monkey. He wants to be hailed as a god…

Chin-Kee is the ultimate negative Chinese stereotype, and he’s ruining his cousin Danny’s life. Danny’s a popular kid at school, but every year Chin-Kee comes to visit, and every year Danny has to transfer to a new school to escape the shame. This year, though, things quickly go from bad to worse…

These three apparently unrelated tales come together with an unexpected twist, in a modern fable that is hilarious, poignant and action-packed. American Born Chinese is an amazing rise, all the way up to the astonishing climax–and confirms what a growing number of readers already know: Gene Yang is a major talent.

07. May 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Fiction, Graphic Novel, Historical Fiction, Kristy, Teen Books

Boxers by Gene Luen Yang, read by Kristy, on 04/15/2014

China, 1898. Bands of foreign missionaries and soldiers roam the countryside, bullying and robbing Chinese peasants.

Little Bao has had enough. Harnessing the powers of ancient Chinese gods, he recruits an army of Boxers–commoners trained in kung fu–who fight to free China from “foreign devils.”

Against all odds, this grass-roots rebellion is violently successful. But nothing is simple. Little Bao is fighting for the glory of China, but at what cost? So many are dying, including thousands of “secondary devils”–Chinese citizens who have converted to Christianity.

07. May 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Fiction, Graphic Novel, Historical Fiction, Kristy, Teen Books

Saints by Gene Luen Yang, read by Kristy, on 04/20/2014

China, 1898. An unwanted and unwelcome fourth daughter, Four-Girl isn’t even given a proper name by her family when she’s born. She finds friendship–and a name, Vibiana–in the most unlikely of places: Christianity. 

But China is a dangerous place for Christians. The Boxer Rebellion is in full swing, and bands of young men roam the countryside, murdering Westerners and Chinese Christians alike. Torn between her nation and her Christian friends, Vibiana will have to decide where her true loyalties lie…and whether she is willing to die for her faith.

06. May 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Children's Books, Fiction, Graphic Novel

Explorer: The Lost Islands by Kazu Kibuishi, read by Angie, on 05/05/2014

This is a collection of seven short graphic stories. They all center around tales on islands. There is Rabbit Island where the rabbits become to reliant on a robot. The Mask Dance is a scary story about a girl who sails to another island and dances all night with ghostly masked figures. Carapace tells the story of a young man lost on an island and his ghostly companion. Desert Island Playlist is an unusual story about a young girl who washes up on a beach and meets a baby and an old woman. Loah is a tale of fish who escape their exploding island. Radio Adrift is about a young mage-in-training who enlists the help of a DJ to hatch her pixie. The Fisherman tells the story of a group of fisherman who discover a mysterious island. I enjoyed the variety of these stories and the wonderful illustrations.

06. May 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Fiction, Graphic Novel, Teen Books

Unforgotten by Tohby Riddle, read by Angie, on 05/05/2014

Unforgotten is an illustrated poem. It shows angels looking over us until one of them falls to earth. The angel becomes frozen until someone notices it and brings it back to life. I found the illustrations really interesting as all the people are either photographs or works of art. The angels are simple black and white line drawings that really stand out against the colorful backgrounds. This is a different kind of book, but one that was worth the read.

06. May 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Children's Books, Fiction, Graphic Novel, Historical Fiction, Lisa

Hidden: A Child's Story of the Holocaust by Loïc Dauvillier, Marc Lizano (Illustrations), Greg Salsedo (Ink), Alexis Siegel (Translator), read by Lisa, on 04/07/2014

In this gentle, poetic young graphic novel, Dounia, a grandmother, tells her granddaughter the story even her son has never heard: how, as a young Jewish girl in Paris, she was hidden away from the Nazis by a series of neighbors and friends who risked their lives to keep her alive when her parents had been taken to concentration camps.

Hidden ends on a tender note, with Dounia and her mother rediscovering each other as World War II ends . . . and a young girl in present-day France becoming closer to her grandmother, who can finally, after all those years, tell her story. With words by Loïc Dauvillier and art by Marc Lizano and Greg Salsedo, this picture book-style comic for young readers is a touching read.

01. May 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Brian, Fiction, Graphic Novel, Horror · Tags:

American Vampire Volume 2 by Scott Snyder, read by Brian, on 05/01/2014

vampireScott Snyder & Stephen King, have created an alternative history based on the vampire, The American Vampire.  Volume one focused on the Hollywood vampires.  Volume two we meet a stronger more vicious vampire in the Las Vegas territory.  Read the series, you will get SUCKED into it.

 

30. April 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Adult Books, Courtney, Fantasy, Graphic Novel

Lucifer, Vol. 2 by Mike Carey, read by Courtney, on 04/27/2014

Book Two of the Lucifer series begins with Lucifer creating an entire universe outside of our own, complete with his own Adam and Eve. Universe building is cool and all, but there are parties in our universe that seek control over the new one. Mazikeen raises an army, which actually comes in handy. The Angel Michael’s daughter has a score to settle. Another angel takes out a contract on Lucifer.
A lot happens in this volume, but various story lines from the first book are starting to come together.

30. April 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Adult Books, Courtney, Dystopia, Graphic Novel, Science Fiction

Transmetropolitan, Vol. 2: Lust for Life by Warren Ellis, read by Courtney, on 04/26/2014

Volume two kicks off with Spider’s partner, Channon, moping over her boyfriend’s decision to download his consciousness into a sentient gaseous cloud. And it just gets weirder from there. Spider has some catching up to do after his self-imposed exile. He takes an extended tour of reservations, where ancient cultures are preserved (for better or worse). Volume two ends with Spider on the run from a variety of parties who want to see him come to harm (including a talking police dog with a serious bone to settle) and who somehow believe that he would actually care that they’re holding the cryogenically-frozen head of his ex-wife for ransom. They clearly don’t know Spider Jerusalem very well at all.
Darkly funny and full of surprises, volume two of Transmetropolitan doesn’t disappoint.

30. April 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Adult Books, Courtney, Graphic Novel, Science Fiction

Transmetropolitan Vol. 1: Back on the Street by Warren Ellis, read by Courtney, on 04/13/2014

Journalist Spider Jerusalem has been off the grid for years. He’s got everything he needs to avoid humanity. Everything except for a completed contract, the remainder of which is now being called in by Jerusalem’s editor. Spider reluctantly moves back to the city, a futuristic hellscape of depravity and corruption. In other words, Spider’s back in his element.
I’ve read this volume before, but it was so long ago that I decided to reread it now that the library has the whole series. Transmetropolitan is hilarious, filthy, sacrilegious and all-around entertaining. Spider is a bit of a Hunter S. Thompson for the future, drugs, smokes and all. A great choice for cynics everywhere.

28. April 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Adult Books, Fiction, Graphic Novel, Humor, Science Fiction, Tammy, Teen Books · Tags: , ,

Vader's Little Princess by Jeffrey Brown, read by Tammy, on 04/08/2014

vaders little princessJeffrey Brown’s second book. Here he imagines the challenges Darth Vader would have faced raising a girl while still a Sith Lord. Parents of girls will recognize some of these scenarios as Leia moves from sweet little girl having a tea party to rebellious teen. I think teens will enjoy the humor in this book too. Small amount of adult humor in this book but it is suggestive rather than blatant so it would go over most younger kids heads. As an adult Star Wars fan, I thought this book was funnier than Darth Vader and Son. I recognized more lines straight out of the movies and more situations slightly changed. A fun, quick read with fun illustrations.

 

28. April 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Adult Books, Children's Books, Fiction, Graphic Novel, Humor, Science Fiction, Tammy, Teen Books · Tags: , ,

Darth Vader and Son by Jeffrey Brown, read by Tammy, on 04/18/2014

darth vader and sonJeffrey Brown imagines what it might have been like for Darth Vader if he had taken an active role in raising Luke. In this sweet snapshots of Luke’s childhood, Vader is a dad like any other dad, except all of his staff are afraid of him. Luke appears oblivious to all the adult goings on. This was a fun and humorous book. Kid-friendly humor and illustrations. It could be book for a child, teen or adult, but adults and teens that are ardent fans of Star Wars will get references to the movies and quotes straight from the movies rewritten to fit a parenting scenario.

28. April 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Children's Books, Fiction, Graphic Novel, Science Fiction, Tammy · Tags: , ,

Star Wars: Jedi Academy by Jeffrey Brown, read by Tammy, on 04/20/2014

star wars jedi academyAuthor and illustrator Jeff Brown brings us the story of Roan and his first year at the Jedi Academy as a late-starter. He brings both the middle school experience and Jedi training to life. Told through drawings, comics, letters and diary entries we see Roan progress through his being the new kid at school to being proud to be a Jedi. Fun for the whole family and kid-friendly. Though some words throughout will be challenging for younger readers and will require a parent’s assistance. As an adult Star Wars fan I enjoyed the story as well.

07. April 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Adult Books, Courtney, Fiction, Graphic Novel

The Sandman: Overture Special Edition, #1 by Neil Gaiman, read by Courtney, on 03/09/2014

Each of the six issues of THE SANDMAN: OVERTURE will be followed the next month by its own Special Edition which will include an interview with a member of the creative team, plus rare artwork and more. This issue starts things off with an interview with J.H. Williams.

This issue will include the entire first issue of the new miniseries, including the gatefold in its original form before coloring, giving readers a behind-the-scenes at J.H. Williams’ unique process. Williams’ original coloring will be shown in addition to the black, white and gray tones of the original work. In addition, the lettering will be translucent, allowing the reader to see the exquisite artwork behind the word balloons.

07. April 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Adult Books, Courtney, Fairy Tales and Folklore, Fiction, Graphic Novel

Delphine by Richard Sala, read by Courtney, on 03/21/2014

Delphine tells the tale of an unnamed man searching for his estranged girlfriend. The girl, Delphine, had gone back to her hometown to help with her ailing father, but never returned. The protagonist has managed to track down the town, but is immediately beset by a string of bizarre and creepy occurrences that seem to conspire to frustrate his efforts. He encounters witches, monsters, secret passages, mysterious woods and other stuff of fairy tales. This is, ostensibly, a spin on Snow White (told from the perspective of the prince), though I failed to see the connection until it was pointed out to me. The fairy tale allusions are clearly intentional and Sala’s dark and haunting artwork lends itself well to the atmosphere of the story. It takes awhile to get a grip on the process of events, but that appears to be part of the journey.

07. April 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Courtney, Fiction, Graphic Novel, Teen Books

In Real Life by Cory Doctorow, Jen Wang, read by Courtney, on 03/26/2014

Anda spends the vast majority of her free time playing the MMORPG, Coursegold. She is thrilled when she is invited to join a girls-only guild. Her life feels complete. One of Anda’s guild members encourages Anda to do some side work killing off gold farmers in exchange for some quick cash (the gold farmers just collect gold and rare prizes to sell on the online marketplace for real money). Believing the fundamental idea of gold farming to be wrong, Anda is at first happy to kill off these low-level players. Then she realizes that they’re not fighting back. She lingers behind to chat with one of the gold farmers and discovers that he is actually employed by a company in China. The farmer calls himself Raymond and explains to her that he spends extremely long hours working to help pay his family’s bills. The pay is low and the conditions are grim, but no one dares to complain for fear of losing their jobs. Anda is appalled and encourages Raymond to organize against his employers, only to find that her worldview is distinctly privileged and that her encouragement may have done more harm than good.
In Real Life has a lot going for it. The protagonist is a smart, plus-sized gamer girl and the artwork depicting the game world and the real world is both charming and nuanced. The subject matter is important for those in the gaming world to know about and is rarely discussed in popular culture. I wish, however, more time had been spent on the lives of the Chinese teens who work in these internet cafes/sweatshops and how the process itself works. The concept of gold farming is more comprehensively addressed in Doctorow’s novel, For the Win, so those wanting to know more will want to read that next.