26. February 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Apocalyptic, Dystopia, Fiction, Jane, Teen Books

Maze Runner by James Dashner, read by Jane, on 02/20/2014

When Thomas wakes up in the lift, the only thing he can remember is his first name. His memory is blank. But he’s not alone. When the lift’s doors open, Thomas finds himself surrounded by kids who welcome him to the Glade-a large, open expanse surrounded by stone walls.

Just like Thomas, the Gladers don’t know why or how they got to the Glade. All they know is that every morning the stone doors to the maze that surrounds them have opened. Every night they’ve closed tight. And every 30 days a new boy has been delivered in the lift.

Thomas was expected. But the next day, a girl is sent up-the first girl to ever arrive in the Glade. And more surprising yet is the message she delivers.

Thomas might be more important than he could ever guess. If only he could unlock the dark secrets buried within his mind.

26. February 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Dystopia, Fiction, Jane, Teen Books

Prodigy by Marie Lu, read by Jane, on 02/13/2014

Injured and on the run, it has been seven days since June and Day barely escaped Los Angeles and the Republic with their lives. Day is believed dead having lost his own brother to an execution squad who thought they were assassinating him. June is now the Republic’s most wanted traitor. Desperate for help, they turn to the Patriots – a vigilante rebel group sworn to bring down the Republic. But can they trust them or have they unwittingly become pawns in the most terrifying of political games?

26. February 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Dystopia, Fiction, Jane, Teen Books

Legend by Marie Lu, read by Jane, on 02/06/2014

What was once the western United States is now home to the Republic, a nation perpetually at war with its neighbors. Born into an elite family in one of the Republic’s wealthiest districts, fifteen-year-old June is a prodigy being groomed for success in the Republic’s highest military circles. Born into the slums, fifteen-year-old Day is the country’s most wanted criminal. But his motives may not be as malicious as they seem.

From very different worlds, June and Day have no reason to cross paths – until the day June’s brother, Metias, is murdered and Day becomes the prime suspect. Caught in the ultimate game of cat and mouse, Day is in a race for his family’s survival, while June seeks to avenge Metias’s death. But in a shocking turn of events, the two uncover the truth of what has really brought them together, and the sinister lengths their country will go to keep its secrets.

Full of nonstop action, suspense, and romance, this novel is sure to move readers as much as it thrills.

11. February 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Adult Books, Dystopia, Fiction, Helen, Science Fiction

When She Woke by Hillary Jordan, read by Helen, on 01/31/2012

I am red now. It was her first thought of the day, every day, surfacing after a few seconds of fogged, blessed ignorance and sweeping through her like a wave, breaking in her breast with a soundless roar. Hard on its heels came the second wave, crashing into the wreckage left by the first: he is gone.

Hannah Payne’s life has been devoted to church and family. But after she’s convicted of murder, she awakens to a nightmarish new life. She finds herself lying on a table in a bare room, covered only by a paper gown, with cameras broadcasting her every move to millions at home, for whom observing new Chromes—criminals whose skin color has been genetically altered to match the class of their crime—is a sinister form of entertainment. Hannah is a Red for the crime of murder. The victim, says the State of Texas, was her unborn child, and Hannah is determined to protect the identity of the father, a public figure with whom she shared a fierce and forbidden love.

A powerful reimagining of The Scarlet LetterWhen She Woke is a timely fable about a stigmatized woman struggling to navigate an America of the not-too-distant future, where the line between church and state has been eradicated, and convicted felons are no longer imprisoned but chromed and released back into the population to survive as best they can. In seeking a path to safety in an alien and hostile world, Hannah unknowingly embarks on a journey of self-discovery that forces her to question the values she once held true and the righteousness of a country that politicizes faith and love.

10. February 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Dystopia, Fiction, Teen Books · Tags:

Article 5 by Kristen Simmons , read by Angie, on 03/18/2012

Imagine a world ravaged by war and taken over by the religious right. This is the dystopic future of Kristen Simmons Article 5. Sometime in the not so distant future the United States has lost a war with foes unknown. The outcome of that war is that the moral majority takes over and takes away the civil liberties of the population. Sounds scary and just a little bit possible doesn’t it? This is the world of Ember. She is a regular 17-year old worried about mom, school, friends. Then she comes home one day and the Moral Militia are arresting her and her mom for article violations. Why? Because her mom became pregnant without being married. Ember is a bastard. Doesn’t matter that it happened long before the MM took over. They are still arrested and taken away. Ember has no idea what happens to her mom; she is taken to a reform school with a bunch of other girls like her. Then her childhood love, Chase, who now belongs to the MM comes and rescues her. They embark on a race to find a safe place in a world that is hunting them.

We don’t learn a whole lot about the war or the group that brought about this dystopian power. Now most of the time I would rage about the lack of world building and how it makes the book weaker, but in this case it is ok. The present time of the world is developed enough that I don’t think you need the whole back story of the world. It makes it scarier in my opinion to leave parts up to your own imagination. The articles themselves are pretty interesting and don’t seem that out of the realm of possibility: you have to worship the one religion; family is defined as man, woman, children; you can only read appropriate materials; you have to behave morally; etc. Seems like things you hear about in present day. Of course the military isn’t killing you if you violate any of these right now. I thought the MM coming in and cleansing towns and people was also a really interesting idea and well thought out. I can just see this systematic taking over of the country. I also liked the rebellion because of course there will be a rebellion. Not everyone is going to fall in line.

I think my biggest issue with this book was the main character. Ember is a really hard character to like or root for. She is whiny and stupid for most of the book. She is 17 so you would think she would be a little smarter and she is about some things but then she is really stupid and naive. Her relationship with Chase is one example. They were in love, he joins the military (because he is drafted and has no choice), he is there when she and her mom are arrested, he rescues her, but then she runs away from him and doesn’t trust him several times even though he has shown no reason for this. I didn’t get her motivation for most of the book and she really didn’t grow into a decent character until about the last 50 pages or so. If I was Chase I probably would have left her on the side of the road. Chase was a great character. You could see his conflict and his determination to do what is right. He was a character I could root for.

Of course there were things about the book that were very predictable as well. The storyline with the mom was so predictable I couldn’t believe it. I was waiting for the twist throughout the whole book because I couldn’t believe it would be so obvious, but it was. I couldn’t believe Ember didn’t ask more questions or pick up on the signs or that situation. The MM was also very one dimensional. I wish we could have seen a little bit more from the bad guys. However, I like where this world is going and I will probably read the next book in the series.

10. February 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Apocalyptic, Dystopia, Fiction, Teen Books

Hollowland by Amanda Hocking, read by Angie, on 03/17/2012

The world has come to and end and zombies are run amok. This is the world of Amanda Hocking’s Hollowland. This is a fast paced zombie adventure novel. It reads almost more like a movie than a book and I could definitely see it unfolding on screen. There are things I like about this book. I like the heroine; I think she kicks ass and has come to grips with the world as it now is; she isn’t sentimental except about her brother. She sees things as they are and she is realistic. So often the characters in these post-apocalyptic books don’t seem to be in touch with the reality of their world and she is. I like that. I also love Ripley the zombie eating lion. I know…not very realistic, but for some reason it worked for me and I liked it. I didn’t really like the boy in this one. Didn’t get the romance angle didn’t see the point and not sure why it was in there. Didn’t make sense to me why she was attracted to him or why they got together in the first place. My quibble since all these teen books seem to have to have a romance angle. This was a fun zombie book and I am glad I finally got to read it.

07. February 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Dystopia, Fiction, Kristy, Science Fiction, Teen Books

Feed by M.T. Anderson, read by Kristy, on 01/25/2014

Identity crises, consumerism, and star-crossed teenage love in a futuristic society where people connect to the Internet via feeds implanted in their brains.

For Titus and his friends, it started out like any ordinary trip to the moon – a chance to party during spring break and play with some stupid low-grav at the Ricochet Lounge. But that was before the crazy hacker caused all their feeds to malfunction, sending them to the hospital to lie around with nothing inside their heads for days. And it was before Titus met Violet, a beautiful, brainy teenage girl who has decided to fight the feed and its omnipresent ability to categorize human thoughts and desires. Following in the footsteps of George Orwell, Anthony Burgess, and Kurt Vonnegut Jr., M. T. Anderson has created a not-so-brave new world — and a smart, savage satire that has captivated readers with its view of an imagined future that veers unnervingly close to the here and now.

06. February 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Dystopia, Fiction, Tammy, Teen Books

Allegiant: Divergent series book 3 by Veronica Roth, read by Tammy, on 01/27/2014

allegiantTold from both Tobias’ and Tris’ perspective this story ends the Divergent trilogy. Tris and Tobias must discover the secrets that lay outside their city’s walls. Tris tries to understand the decisions others have made and faces the truth about their city and about her and Tobias’ family history. They both learn what courage, allegiance, sacrifice and love really mean.

 

13. January 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Dystopia, Fiction, Sarah, Teen Books

Insurgent by Veronica Roth, read by Sarah, on 01/09/2014

  Beatrice Prior (“Tris”) was a divergent who chose to join the Dauntless faction when she turned 16.  This book continues exactly where Divergent left off with death and destruction fresh in Tris and her boyfriend, Tobias’ minds.  They have to figure out what is happening and how to stop the simulations.  This book explains a lot more of what is happening between the factions and makes you realize that each faction needs the other to survive.  This book was fast-paced and full of twists and turns that leave you breathless.  You have to read it to believe it.

13. January 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Dystopia, Fiction, Sarah, Teen Books

Divergent by Veronica Roth, read by Sarah, on 01/03/2014

  Divergent is an awesome, thrill-ride full of an attempt at a utopian society, romance, death-defying experiences, and life choices that will change the world.  Society is divided into five different factions with each focusing on a different personality characteristic that is believed to be the best.  Courage, pursuit of knowledge, selflessness, and peacefulness are a few of the ideal traits.  When a person reaches 16, he or she can choose which faction to join for the rest of their lives.  This decision can make all the difference in how your life unravels afterward.  I highly recommend this book.

08. January 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Apocalyptic, Dystopia, Fiction, Kristy, Teen Books

Allegiant by Veronica Roth, read by Kristy, on 12/15/2013

The faction-based society that Tris Prior once believed in is shattered—fractured by violence and power struggles and scarred by loss and betrayal. So when offered a chance to explore the world past the limits she’s known, Tris is ready. Perhaps beyond the fence, she and Tobias will find a simple new life together, free from complicated lies, tangled loyalties, and painful memories.

But Tris’s new reality is even more alarming than the one she left behind. Old discoveries are quickly rendered meaningless. Explosive new truths change the hearts of those she loves. And once again, Tris must battle to comprehend the complexities of human nature—and of herself—while facing impossible choices about courage, allegiance, sacrifice, and love.

Told from a riveting dual perspective, Allegiant, by #1 New York Times best-selling author Veronica Roth, brings the Divergent series to a powerful conclusion while revealing the secrets of the dystopian world that has captivated millions of readers in Divergent and Insurgent.

08. January 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Dystopia, Fairy Tales and Folklore, Fiction, Kristy, Romance, Science Fiction, Teen Books

Scarlet by Marissa Meyer, read by Kristy, on 12/08/2013

Feisty Scarlet is young the star of the second book in the Lunar Chronicles series. When her grandmother, a former military pilot, goes missing, Scarlet does everything she can to find her. This quest to find her grandmother leads Scarlet on a dangerous journey with the street fighter, Wolf. Her quest also leads her to cross paths and develop and unexpected friendship with Cinder.

This book subtly deviates away from the retelling of Cinderella and instead displays innovative retelling of Little Red Riding Hood. Fans of the first book will be sure to enjoy the second book in this series. My only complaint is that Cinder’s storyline fades too far into the background of Scarlet.

08. January 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Dystopia, Fairy Tales and Folklore, Fiction, Kristy, Romance, Science Fiction, Teen Books

Cinder by Marissa Meyer, read by Kristy, on 12/05/2013

Cinder, the first book in the Lunar Chronicles series, is a must-read for teens or adults who enjoy retellings of classic fairy tales. This book features a teen named Cinder: a talented cyborg mechanic who has a miserable home life and a mysterious past. Despite her second class status and occupation, Cinder manages to catch the eye of the local prince. But with a plague destroying the earth’s population, a war being threatened by a ruthless lunar queen, and Cinder concealing the fact that she’s a cyborg, will the romance between these two blossom or burn?

This retelling of the Cinderella fairy tale is fresh and original. But be warned: once you pick this book up, it will be hard to put down!

11. December 2013 · Comments Off · Categories: Apocalyptic, Dystopia, Fiction, Kira, Romance, Science Fiction · Tags:

Allegiant by Veronica Roth, read by Kira, on 12/06/2013

This title unlike the previous 2, is narrated by both Tris and Tobias. I’m Not sure this adds that much (unlike hearing Beans narrative in contrast to Ender’s version of the same story). I’m always suspicious that the author is trying to pad their work to add more pages.  Maybe Roth is pulling a Hobbit Movie extension trick, trying to get as much out of the story as she can.  Overall, I liked this book, no it wasn’t as fast-paced as the other two, but you gained a lot of explanation.  I wonder if Roth knew where the series was headed when she published the first book.

 

allegiant  DIVERGENT-ALLEGIANTalegntimagesallegns

If a song was playing during the opening scenes, it could be the Who’s “Don’t Get Fooled Again” new boss, same as the old boss…

04. December 2013 · Comments Off · Categories: Courtney, Dystopia, Teen Books

Unsouled (Unwind #3) by Neal Shusterman, read by Courtney, on 11/24/2013

Book three of the Unwind Dystology picks up where book two left off. Pretty much everyone is on the run or in hiding. Connor and Lev are in search of asylum from the Juvenile Authority and a particularly determined parts-pirate. Risa is on her own, also seeking save haven. Cam is busy compiling damning evidence against the Juvenile Authority while living the life of a celebrity. Connor and Lev head to the Arapache reservation where they must come to terms with the tragedies inflicted by the Juvenile Authority the last time Lev was in their care. Risa changes her appearance and mostly travels alone. Cam plays up his public image until he is informed that he is now effectively owned by the military, a fact that doesn’t sit well with his already-fragmented mind. The love triangle is still more or less in effect, although the characters aren’t really around each other enough in this installment for any real progress to be made one way or another. Eventually, all the major players will reunite and starling revelations regarding the history of unwinding and the role of Proactive Citizenry will come to pass.
A lot of this volume consists of traveling or hiding. All of the major players are nationally famous and must keep to the shadows if they are to survive. The Juvenile Authority and Proactive Citizenry continue to the embodiment of government-sponsored evil. While this book will not work as a stand-alone, it definitely expands the world that Shusterman has created. I didn’t love this one as much as the first two, mostly because it’s super-long and relatively low-action. There’s a lot of reminders about the outcomes from the first couple of books, presumably for readers like me who may have forgotten exactly how everything played out earlier. New characters are introduced, which is always fun and interesting. Things are complicated, but the horrifying premise gains a lot more traction with the extra world-building supplied by this installment. I’m interested to see where this series ultimately ends up. Evidently, there’s one more book to go, but I’m still not so sure Connor and co. are going to be able to take down such an insidious system.

03. December 2013 · Comments Off · Categories: Bryan, Dystopia, Fiction, Science Fiction, Teen Books

Allegiant by Veronica Roth, read by Bryan, on 11/20/2013

allegiantThe final part of the trilogy, Tris and Tobias’s lives continue to be jumbled as they are selected to leave Chicago and visit the outside world.  Once there, they find that their entire world-view is false and they have to decide to live in this reality or face that all they know will be erased.  This book is a good conclusion to the trilogy, although the wrap-up chapters take way too long, in my opinion.  The book is also written differently than the others — it alternates between Tris and Tobias as first-person POV.  It becomes clear why Roth did this as the story unfolds, but I found it a bit distracting.

02. December 2013 · Comments Off · Categories: Bryan, Dystopia, Fiction, Science Fiction, Teen Books

Insurgent by Veronica Roth, read by Bryan, on 11/07/2013

36zxyqpbInsurgentTris Prior continues on her adventures in factioned Chicago.  This book is the typical second act of a three-act play — darker and basically a “how much worse can it get” plot.  Tris’s life continues to unravel with losses of family and friends.  Politically things erode to a point that she is faced with joining the Factionless.  However, there are agendas at play there as well…

This book continues the pace of the previous and does a good job building to the climax.  Not a bad read.

02. December 2013 · Comments Off · Categories: Bryan, Dystopia, Science Fiction, Teen Books

Divergent by Veronica Roth, read by Bryan, on 11/03/2013

divergentTris Prior lives in a future Chicago that is recovering from war.  Society is broken into groups of like people, and at the age of 16, each person gets to choose their group.  Tris makes a difficult decision to choose against her family’s group and the adventure begins.  Plots are uncovered and all of society (as they know it) is at stake.  Much like the Hunger Games, this book is a good read and would be appealing to teens who do not feel in control of their lives.  It is fast paced but still has some substance.

30. November 2013 · Comments Off · Categories: Apocalyptic, Dystopia, Fiction, Leslie, Teen Books

Ashes, Ashes by Jo Treggiari, read by Leslie, on 11/06/2013

7671562

In a future Manhattan devastated by environmental catastrophes and epidemics, sixteen-year-old Lucy survives alone until vicious hounds target her and force her to join Aidan and his band, but soon they learn that she is the target of Sweepers, who kidnap and infect people with plague.

This wasn’t too bad, as far as dystopian novels go.  I thought it was good, but fairly predictable to me.  Teens will enjoy it and want to read the rest of the series to see how the characters turn out.  I think I may pass on the rest of them.  Very interesting to wonder if we would turn out the past as quickly in order to get our survival skills fine tuned.

26. November 2013 · Comments Off · Categories: Apocalyptic, Dystopia, Fantasy, Fiction, Tammy, Teen Books

The Death Cure (The Maze Runner Series book 3) by James Dashner, read by Tammy, on 11/09/2013

death cureThe conclusion of the Maze Runner trilogy. Our hero Thomas does not trust anyone at Wicked even though now they say the time for lies has ended. Wicked claims that it is up to the Gladers to complete the final blueprint for the cure for the flare and that they need to have their memories restored to complete the process and agree to a final voluntary test. Thomas already remembers more than anyone at Wicked knows and he doesn’t trust that the memories that would be restored would be real. But the truth is more dangerous than Thomas can imagine. Will he survive the cure?