06. August 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Apocalyptic, Fiction, Leslie, Teen Books

Fragments by Dan Wells, 564 pages, read by Leslie, on 07/21/2014

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After discovering the cure for RM, Kira Walker sets off on a terrifying journey into the ruins of postapocalyptic America and the darkest desires of her heart in order to uncover the means—and a reason—for humanity’s survival.

While we have gotten a lot of gadgets from science fiction stories as life imitates art, I can only hope that we never see stories of post apocalyptic earth ever come true.  The series is definitely a story of perseverance and the human spirit never giving up.  A thrilling, can’t wait to see what happens next, kind of story, a good young adult series.

04. August 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Apocalyptic, Contemporary Fiction, Fiction, Teen Books, Thriller/Suspense

The Living by Matt de la Pena, 320 pages, read by Angie, on 08/04/2014

Shy is working on a Paradise Cruise ship when a man jumps overboard right in front of him. The story picks up on the next cruise and this time people are asking questions. A mysterious man in a suit starts asking about Shy and what the suicide victim might have said to him. Shy’s room is searched and the man keeps following him. We have no idea what this is about. Then a big storm approaches the cruise ship and we learn that “the Big One” has hit the west coast of America. A tsunami is headed towards the ship and in fact three waves hit and cause it to sink. Shy ends up on a broken lifeboat with no supplies. He rescues an older man and a young girl. The man has been bitten by a shark and eventually dies. The girl is a rich snob who picked on Shy on the ship. Addi and Shy have to come to terms with each other and fight to survive. Just when all hope is lost they are rescued and taken to a mysterious island where things just get even stranger. 

This book felt really disjointed like it wasn’t sure what kind of book it was going to be. The beginning was a realistic story about people from different backgrounds and socioeconomic status mingling on a ship and how they react to each other. The second part was pure apocalyptic with the earthquake and the tsunami and having to survive at sea. The end was a bit sci-fi mystery with the secret island and the weird scientists and the sickness infecting survivors. I think any of those books would have been interesting but together they were a bit of a mess. I wish the whole evil corporation bit would have been left off of the story because I think it would have been stronger with just the other two storylines. However, since this is the beginning of a series I guess you really needed somewhere to go. 

01. August 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Apocalyptic, Fantasy, Fiction, Teen Books

Love in the Time of Global Warming by Francesca Lia Block, 240 pages, read by Angie, on 07/31/2014

Weird, wonderful, confusing, lyrical, strange, magical, incomprehensible…how to describe this book. The language of the story is beautiful and lyrical. The journey of the book is magical and schizophrenic. The story is a bit of a mess mixed with the Odyssey. On one hand I liked it, but on the other I thought it was a disaster of a book. 

This is the story of Pen (Penelope) who lives in LA with her mom, dad and brother Venice in a pink house by the sea. The end comes in the form of an Earth Shaker which destroys the world. Pen is left alone in her pink house with the sea even closer. She hides out until she is forced to leave. Then she sets off on a journey that mirrors the journey of Odysseus in the Odyssey. She blinds an one-eyed giant, gets stuck in the lotus-eater hotel, meets sirens and witches and seers. She is joined on her journey by beautiful Hex (boy who used to be a girl with a lot of problems) and tragic Ez and Ash. She is searching for her family. Turns out their is also an evil genius who created and cloned these flesh-eating giants and has a vendetta against Pen’s family. There is all kinds of crazy going on which just forces Pen to toughen up. She loses an eye but that only makes her able to see even more. And of course her entire journey is based on the path of orange butterflies. 

If you are confused by the description, just imagine how confusing the book is! The writing is beautiful and Pen’s story is fleshed out through flashbacks to her life Then (before the Earth Shaker). This is not your typical post-apocalyptic novel. There are magical forces at work here that make the story just a bit incomprehensible. It is interesting and beautiful, but definitely confusing. I thought there was just a little too much reliance on The Odyssey. The characters quote from it constantly and are way more familiar with the story than your average teenagers; they also say things like “this is just like the Odyssey” which I thought was a little too obvious. I’ve finished the book and am still not 100% sure what I thought of it. I liked it and disliked it. 

22. July 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Apocalyptic, Fiction, Noelle, Science Fiction, Teen Books, Thriller/Suspense

The 5th Wave by Rick Yancy, 457 pages, read by Noelle, on 07/03/2014

After the 1st wave, only darkness remains. After the 2nd, only the lucky escape. And after the 3rd, only the unlucky survive. After the 4th wave, only one rule applies: trust no one.

Now, it’s the dawn of the 5th wave, and on a lonely stretch of highway, Cassie runs from Them. The beings who only look human, who roam the countryside killing anyone they see. Who have scattered Earth’s last survivors. To stay alone is to stay alive, Cassie believes, until she meets Evan Walker. Beguiling and mysterious, Evan Walker may be Cassie’s only hope for rescuing her brother–or even saving herself. But Cassie must choose: between trust and despair, between defiance and surrender, between life and death. To give up or to get up.

26. June 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Apocalyptic, Brian, Fiction, Graphic Novel

Lazarus, Vol. 1 Family by Greg Rucka, 96 pages, read by Brian, on 06/25/2014

lazarusIn the future, there is no government and no countries.  The families with the most win.  Each family has Lazarus a family member brought back from the dead to protect the family.

 

07. June 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Apocalyptic, Courtney, Fantasy, Fiction, Graphic Novel, Teen Books

Attack on Titan, Volume 01 by Hajime Isayama , 208 pages, read by Courtney, on 05/01/2014

I picked up this series because my teens are massive fans and our anime club has watched several episodes. The premise is interesting enough: a race of massive humanoid creatures known as Titans have destroyed enough of humanity that the entire remaining population lives within the concentric walls of a single city. One hundred years goes by without any attacks and humanity has developed a false sense of security. Eren Yeager joins the guardians of the wall and dreams of a life outside. Then the Titans return. Destruction and bloodshed ensue.

I didn’t really get into the manga and a lot of that might have been due to the translation. Unless the writing wasn’t very good to begin with. Sometimes it’s hard to tell. I kept stumbling across lines like “Your father, Dr. Yeager, said…” and unless there’s something seriously wrong with Eren, I’m guessing he knows that Dr. Yeager is his father. I might have forgiven it once, but it happened multiple times alongside other examples of clumsy translation. I’ll leave this one to my teens. 

30. April 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Apocalyptic, Fiction, Kira · Tags:

Legend by Marie Lu, 305 pages, read by Kira, on 04/27/2014

Legend_Marie_Lu_Book_coverIn post-apocalyptic Los Angeles, two highly intelligent teenagers alegendTess n Dayre working for opposing sides.  Rebel, Day was to have been killed when he supposedly failed his trials, but lives on the streets with, helping his family survive, as well as thumbing his nose at the Republic, by wreaking havoc.  He is the Republic’s Most Wanted Criminal, Not because his crimes are heinous, but because they make the Republic look bad.

On the other side is child prodigy June, assigned the task of hunting down Day, because he supposedly killed June’s brother Metias.

This is a fast-paced action book, with a romance that is at turns cute and then annoying.

I disliked the number of torture/terrorizing scenes and thus will NOT read the 2 sequels..

28. April 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Adult Books, Apocalyptic, Dystopia, Fiction, Mystery, Science Fiction, Tammy · Tags:

Ashes of the Earth: A Mystery of Post-Apocalyptic America by Eliot Pattison, 359 pages, read by Tammy, on 04/27/2014

ashes of the earth  Thirty years after a nuclear holocaust, survivors struggle to rebuild society in the few remaining areas not poisoned by radiation and germ warfare.

One of the founders of the colony of Carthage, Hadrian, joins forces with a police woman to solve mysterious murders that have started happening. The most painful for Hadrian is that of his close friend and the colony’s leading scientist, Jonah. Is it a government plot? Have some mobsters from the days before infiltrated and re-established a crime syndicate? Why would either of these groups encourage stories among the children of a better life in the afterlife that has lead to so many child suicides?

27. April 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Apocalyptic, Award Winner, Classics, Dystopia, Fiction, Literary Fiction, Rachel, Teen Books

Lord of the Flies by William Golding, 208 pages, read by Rachel, on 04/26/2014

Before The Hunger Games there was Lord of the Flies

Lord of the Flies remains as provocative today as when it was first published in 1954, igniting passionate debate with its startling, brutal portrait of human nature. Though critically acclaimed, it was largely ignored upon its initial publication. Yet soon it became a cult favorite among both students and literary critics who compared it to J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye in its influence on modern thought and literature.

Labeled a parable, an allegory, a myth, a morality tale, a parody, a political treatise, even a vision of the apocalypse, Lord of the Flies has established itself as a true classic.

12. April 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Apocalyptic, Classics, Dystopia, Fiction, Literary Fiction, Rachel, Science Fiction, Teen Books

1984 by George Orwell, 328 pages, read by Rachel, on 04/12/2014

Written in 1948, 1984 was George Orwell’s chilling prophecy about the future. And while 1984 has come and gone, Orwell’s narrative is timelier than ever. 1984 presents a startling and haunting vision of the world, so powerful that it is completely convincing from start to finish. No one can deny the power of this novel, its hold on the imaginations of multiple generations of readers, or the resiliency of its admonitions—a legacy that seems only to grow with the passage of time.

01. April 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Apocalyptic, Courtney, Teen Books

Grasshopper Jungle by Andrew Smith, 388 pages, read by Courtney, on 03/07/2014

Some say the world will end in fire, some say in ice. History will show that the world actually ends with 6-foot-tall carnivorous praying mantises that displace humanity from the top of the food chain. Austin Szerba is interested in the ways in which events, however small, coalesce into what we later call history. Through a fascinating intersection of circumstance and chance, Austin is in the prime position to present a detailed history of the end of the world.
Ealing, IA is your average dying Midwestern small town. The factory that once kept the town afloat shut down years ago. The local mall is nearly vacant. There’s really not a lot for teenaged boys to do. Austin and his best friend, Robby, hang out (skateboard, smoke) in the area behind the mall in the spot they’ve named “the Grasshopper Jungle”. Up until this point, the most challenging thing that Austin’s ever had to deal with is the possibility that he might just be in love with Robby, who came out of the closet in middle school. But Austin really loves his girlfriend, Shann, too. The three of them are best friends, but no matter what the situation, hanging out with them invariably leaves Austin both horny and confused.
One day, Robby and Austin are beaten up in the Grasshopper Jungle by a quartet of bullies. This is the beginning of a chain of events that put Robby and Austin in a prime position to witness the beginning of the end. It just takes them awhile to put all the pieces together and to understand their own role in them.
I’ve been struggling to figure out how to even describe this book. The plot is unusual, to say the least. On one level, it’s a darkly humorous apocalyptic tale. On another level, it’s story about teenagers figuring out who they are and how they fit into this world. On yet another, it’s about all the connections, seen and unseen, that turn seemingly isolated incidents into a greater understanding. Grasshopper Jungle is hilarious and heartfelt, apocalyptic and profane, realistic and completely outlandish. The writing is reminiscent of earlier Kurt Vonnegut works, which is a major bonus point for me. I can say with certainty that I’ve never read a book quite like this one. It’s honestly the kind of book you’ll just have to read and experience to see what I mean. I loved it.

05. March 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Apocalyptic, Children's Books, Eric, Fiction, Science Fiction

Rip Tide by Kat Falls, 314 pages, read by Eric, on 02/28/2014

The continuing adventures of Ty and Gemma, introduced in Dark Life. Someone has dragged under and chained a huge floating township, trapping the inhabitants inside to die. Ty and Gemma are swept into the mystery of the deaths, which soon involves Ty’s family, the infamous Seablite Gang, and those forced into a harsh existence on the ocean’s surface.

Nearly the entire book takes place above water this time, which partially is to blame for my lessened enthusiasm. Ty and Gemma face an array of characters and places straight from the set of Waterworld, or any other number of post-apocalyptic movies. There are to-the-death boxing matches, dirty dealings (and people), and a race against time which didn’t seem very hurried. A second novel can’t possibly capture the enjoyment of being introduced to a fantasy world, but even so, I can’t wait for these two to leave the surface behind, and swim down to where things are far more interesting.

26. February 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Apocalyptic, Dystopia, Fiction, Jane, Teen Books

Maze Runner by James Dashner, 374 pages, read by Jane, on 02/20/2014

When Thomas wakes up in the lift, the only thing he can remember is his first name. His memory is blank. But he’s not alone. When the lift’s doors open, Thomas finds himself surrounded by kids who welcome him to the Glade-a large, open expanse surrounded by stone walls.

Just like Thomas, the Gladers don’t know why or how they got to the Glade. All they know is that every morning the stone doors to the maze that surrounds them have opened. Every night they’ve closed tight. And every 30 days a new boy has been delivered in the lift.

Thomas was expected. But the next day, a girl is sent up-the first girl to ever arrive in the Glade. And more surprising yet is the message she delivers.

Thomas might be more important than he could ever guess. If only he could unlock the dark secrets buried within his mind.

11. February 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Adult Books, Apocalyptic, Fiction, Helen, Horror

The Stand by Stephen King, 1200 pages, read by Helen, on 12/31/2012

This is the way the world ends: with a nanosecond of computer error in a Defense Department laboratory and a million casual contacts that form the links in a chain letter of death.

And here is the bleak new world of the day after: a world stripped of its institutions and emptied of 99 percent of its people. A world in which a handful of panicky survivors choose sides — or are chosen. A world in which good rides on the frail shoulders of the 108-year-old Mother Abagail — and the worst nightmares of evil are embodied in a man with a lethal smile and unspeakable powers: Randall Flagg, the dark man.

In 1978 Stephen King published The Stand, the novel that is now considered to be one of his finest works. But as it was first published, The Stand was incomplete, since more than 150,000 words had been cut from the original manuscript.

Now Stephen King’s apocalyptic vision of a world blasted by plague and embroiled in an elemental struggle between good and evil has been restored to its entirety. The Stand : The Complete And Uncut Editionincludes more than five hundred pages of material previously deleted, along with new material that King added as he reworked the manuscript for a new generation. It gives us new characters and endows familiar ones with new depths. It has a new beginning and a new ending. What emerges is a gripping work with the scope and moral complexity of a true epic.

For hundreds of thousands of fans who read The Stand in its original version and wanted more, this new edition is Stephen King’s gift. And those who are reading The Stand for the first time will discover a triumphant and eerily plausible work of the imagination that takes on the issues that will determine our survival.

11. February 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Adult Books, Apocalyptic, Fiction, Helen, Science Fiction

The Long Tomorrow by Leigh Brackett, 222 pages, read by Helen, on 07/30/2012

Two generations after destruction rained down upon America’s cities, the population is scattered into small towns. Cities are forbidden by law, as is scientific research.

Rumors abound of a secret place known as “Bartorstown”, where science is untrammelled by interference or hatred. A youth named Len Colter, developing an unhealthy thirst for knowledge exacerbated by the discovery of a forbidden radio, sets out on a long road. During this journey, he will change his mind many times before determining the correct direction for himself, and the benighted America in which he lives.

11. February 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Adult Books, Apocalyptic, Fiction, Helen, Science Fiction

Zone One by Colson Whitehead, 259 pages, read by Helen, on 06/30/2012

In this wry take on the post-apocalyptic horror novel, a pandemic has devastated the planet. The plague has sorted humanity into two types: the uninfected and the infected, the living and the living dead.

Now the plague is receding, and Americans are busy rebuild­ing civilization under orders from the provisional govern­ment based in Buffalo. Their top mission: the resettlement of Manhattan. Armed forces have successfully reclaimed the island south of Canal Street—aka Zone One—but pockets of plague-ridden squatters remain. While the army has eliminated the most dangerous of the infected, teams of civilian volunteers are tasked with clearing out a more innocuous variety—the “malfunctioning” stragglers, who exist in a catatonic state, transfixed by their former lives.

Mark Spitz is a member of one of the civilian teams work­ing in lower Manhattan. Alternating between flashbacks of Spitz’s desperate fight for survival during the worst of the outbreak and his present narrative, the novel unfolds over three surreal days, as it depicts the mundane mission of straggler removal, the rigors of Post-Apocalyptic Stress Disorder, and the impossible job of coming to grips with the fallen world.

And then things start to go wrong.

Both spine chilling and playfully cerebral, Zone One bril­liantly subverts the genre’s conventions and deconstructs the zombie myth for the twenty-first century.

10. February 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Angie, Apocalyptic, Dystopia, Fiction, Teen Books

Hollowland by Amanda Hocking, 312 pages, read by Angie, on 03/17/2012

The world has come to and end and zombies are run amok. This is the world of Amanda Hocking’s Hollowland. This is a fast paced zombie adventure novel. It reads almost more like a movie than a book and I could definitely see it unfolding on screen. There are things I like about this book. I like the heroine; I think she kicks ass and has come to grips with the world as it now is; she isn’t sentimental except about her brother. She sees things as they are and she is realistic. So often the characters in these post-apocalyptic books don’t seem to be in touch with the reality of their world and she is. I like that. I also love Ripley the zombie eating lion. I know…not very realistic, but for some reason it worked for me and I liked it. I didn’t really like the boy in this one. Didn’t get the romance angle didn’t see the point and not sure why it was in there. Didn’t make sense to me why she was attracted to him or why they got together in the first place. My quibble since all these teen books seem to have to have a romance angle. This was a fun zombie book and I am glad I finally got to read it.

08. January 2014 · Comments Off · Categories: Apocalyptic, Dystopia, Fiction, Kristy, Teen Books

Allegiant by Veronica Roth, 526 pages, read by Kristy, on 12/15/2013

The faction-based society that Tris Prior once believed in is shattered—fractured by violence and power struggles and scarred by loss and betrayal. So when offered a chance to explore the world past the limits she’s known, Tris is ready. Perhaps beyond the fence, she and Tobias will find a simple new life together, free from complicated lies, tangled loyalties, and painful memories.

But Tris’s new reality is even more alarming than the one she left behind. Old discoveries are quickly rendered meaningless. Explosive new truths change the hearts of those she loves. And once again, Tris must battle to comprehend the complexities of human nature—and of herself—while facing impossible choices about courage, allegiance, sacrifice, and love.

Told from a riveting dual perspective, Allegiant, by #1 New York Times best-selling author Veronica Roth, brings the Divergent series to a powerful conclusion while revealing the secrets of the dystopian world that has captivated millions of readers in Divergent and Insurgent.

11. December 2013 · Comments Off · Categories: Apocalyptic, Dystopia, Fiction, Kira, Romance, Science Fiction · Tags:

Allegiant by Veronica Roth, 526 pages, read by Kira, on 12/06/2013

This title unlike the previous 2, is narrated by both Tris and Tobias. I’m Not sure this adds that much (unlike hearing Beans narrative in contrast to Ender’s version of the same story). I’m always suspicious that the author is trying to pad their work to add more pages.  Maybe Roth is pulling a Hobbit Movie extension trick, trying to get as much out of the story as she can.  Overall, I liked this book, no it wasn’t as fast-paced as the other two, but you gained a lot of explanation.  I wonder if Roth knew where the series was headed when she published the first book.

 

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If a song was playing during the opening scenes, it could be the Who’s “Don’t Get Fooled Again” new boss, same as the old boss…

30. November 2013 · Comments Off · Categories: Apocalyptic, Dystopia, Fiction, Leslie, Teen Books

Ashes, Ashes by Jo Treggiari, 344 pages, read by Leslie, on 11/06/2013

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In a future Manhattan devastated by environmental catastrophes and epidemics, sixteen-year-old Lucy survives alone until vicious hounds target her and force her to join Aidan and his band, but soon they learn that she is the target of Sweepers, who kidnap and infect people with plague.

This wasn’t too bad, as far as dystopian novels go.  I thought it was good, but fairly predictable to me.  Teens will enjoy it and want to read the rest of the series to see how the characters turn out.  I think I may pass on the rest of them.  Very interesting to wonder if we would turn out the past as quickly in order to get our survival skills fine tuned.